aluminum flat nocks for stryker bolts...

Discussion in 'Stryker Crossbows' started by kennisondan, Jul 17, 2008.

  1. kennisondan

    kennisondan Senior Member

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    I am reading about flat nocks.. where can I get replacement flat aluminum nocks for the stryker bolts ... how are they changed out ? I have replaced nocks on regular traditional archery aluminum arrows and used both glue in broadhead inserts and others..
    thanks in advance...
    I need to know everything so that I am ready when and if the stryker arrives..
    dk
     
  2. SPECIALIZED

    SPECIALIZED Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Heads up

    Hi and welcome.Best to call what we shoot in our Crossbows, Arrows:D
     
  3. Mike

    Mike Senior Member

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    Why the big deal about "flat" nocks.

    Bowtech recommends the moon style...!

    Changing them (out?), seems to be a waste of effort. If you want flat nocks, just buy "arrows", WITH flat nocks to begin with!

    I shoot moon in my Stryker...shoots great.
    I shoot moon in my Darton Impact, works great.
    I shoot both moon or flat in my Fireforce and Stinger (Darton) "both" work great.
    I shoot both on an old Barnett, works great.
    I shoot both in a newer Barnett, works great.
    And...I shoot flat only on my Wyvern Medieval bow, works great.

    I see no difference in accuracy.

    Mike
     
  4. Moon

    Moon Senior Member

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    I do,

    although not a practical amount for hunting. Plastic moon nocks are..............just that....platic:) It only took one to be driven up into the shaft, cutting my bowstring. Either will give you satisfactory performance but I like the precision and stability of aluminum nocks. The factory Stryker and Desert Stryker arrows can be retro-fitted simply by twisting and pulling the plastic nocks out and installing aluminum flat nocks with a little cement just as you do with your compound bow arrows. If you are concerned about your warranty do not use flat nocks. If I ever do get a dry fire that causes bow damage, I'll gladly pay for it but I don't expect that to happen. Thousands of shots out of virtually all top brands of crossbows without a glitch is good enough for me. Let your conscience be your guide:)
     
  5. kennisondan

    kennisondan Senior Member

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    thanks..
    dk
     
  6. Moon

    Moon Senior Member

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    I'm thinking of offering this nock

    It's aluminum, shaped right with no sharp edges and is much more stable and precision than a molded plastic nock. I call it "Moon's Mini Moon nock" :)
     

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  7. urban legend

    urban legend Administrator Staff Member

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    Nice moon, Moon.:)
     
  8. Moon

    Moon Senior Member

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    Still working on this

    Maybe we'll have something to offer soon.
     
  9. Iron Duke

    Iron Duke Senior Member

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    Plastic nocks

    This is an old thread, but I just joined the ranks of those who have had a plastic moon nock fail. There is a chunk out of the back of the arrow, no damage to the vanes, no marks down the side of the arrow; which leads me to believe I had the arrow seated correctly. While a relative new comer to crossbows; I have begun to develope a shot sequence during loading perhaps 300 times; which includes a slight test, I rotate each loaded arrow a little to be sure it's seated. Found the nock debris ... split in half. The results being a cut through serving and one string strand; looks like it hurt at least one more strand. Obviously it could have been worse.

    NOW ... what to do with my remaining 22 plastic moon nocked arrows?

    Question ... the nocks appear to be super glued in so am I correct in saying the only way to salvage the arrows is to cut the nocks off thereby shortening the back of the arrow 3/8" or so?
     
  10. urban legend

    urban legend Administrator Staff Member

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    Are you sure you did not break the nock while shooting a group. Most problems with nocks result from one arrow hitting another in the target. Almost like a "robin hood". It's when you don't catch it, the next shot with the arrow that has been damaged can cause some trouble.
     
  11. Moon

    Moon Senior Member

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    It's a plastic nock

    and IMHO, they shouldn't be used at all in high performance crossbows. I don't use them period. It only took one similar incedent for me to stop using them 4 years ago. I've always shot flat aluminum nocks out of the DS and SF and never a problem (thousands of shots).
     
  12. Hunter2

    Hunter2 Senior Member

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    Saftey first

    sounds good, Im sure not a big deal but what is the cost comparison? Hunter2
     
  13. Iron Duke

    Iron Duke Senior Member

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    After about nine Robin Hoods and a bushel of ruined arrows with my verticals at my standard practicing distance of 30 yards; I'm reluctant to even shoot more than two arrows at a spot with my vertical. In the beginning it's exciting to see one arrow sticking into another ... after a few you just start to see dollar signs growing wings. After that ... you just get a sick feeling in your stomach when you hear one arrow slap another.

    So ... I'm 100% sure it's not a semi-Robin Hood or injured arrow. I have never shot two crossbow arrows at the same spot. I've had high expectations for accuracy right from the beginning; and Im shooting 18 yards indoors ... so I knew "groups" would amount to destroying all two dozen of my arrows within a few weeks. I rotate shooting 9 arrows off sand bags at the 9 spots around my 450fps Spyder target; then go record the distance from POA of each numbered arrow; then pull them and shoot the next 9. I'm looking to become acquainted with, and accustomed to the weapon before I entertain outdoors and longer ranges. I have also incorporated a quest to find the best arrows out of the batch I have. Theoretically, that makes about 12 shots on that arrow before the nock split. Of course it could have been my error; but as I said, I seat each arrow firmly and give it a slight twist to make sure its in the bottom of the nock; and I dont see what I could have done wrong to split the nock in half. I did a fair amount of research before purchasing the Strykeforce and was well aware off the hazards and causes of a dry fire. Being a rookie to the crossbow, Ive been focused & vigilant in the arrow loading area to avoid this issue.

    Anyway ... Im learning lessons fast. LOL My reluctance to slow down my arrow with the oft recommended heavy aluminum nocks just cost me a string, an unknown amount of downtime until I find someone to press this contraption here in NJ where crossbows were legalized about 15 minutes ago, and down time to get these plastic nocks off this brutally fast and powerful Strykeforce. Funny when youre new to something you read reams of information and so much is lost to you because you have no reference points to gage importance.

    A question ... it appears that the string rides extremely close to the rails and at 185lbs DW that string can't be going too far from a dead straight line during the shot. I can see no way for it to slip OVER a flat nock. On the other hand ... this moon nock deal requires a test to "FEEL" if it's seated correctly on each loading. It's not like a vertical where you can see that everything is right and proper. Taking this one step further; why use moon nocks at all? Where's the logic? Indexing for arrow spine would make some sense but that's way beyond anything the factory would be concerned with.
     
  14. Cadet Jack

    Cadet Jack Member

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    Any kind of plastic insert on either end of an arrow is subject to damage, either from impact or structural failure. I have never understood the need for a "moon" nock on any type of tracked crossbow. Flat plugs work just fine and do not lift the arrow out of the track or subject the arrow to string oscillation because the flat plug merely allows the arrow to be pushed down the track with as little interaction as possible.

    Many carbon arrow manufacturers have flat plugs (albiet, plastic) to replace moon nocks and many of them will also fit other brands/models.

    An enterprising shop with CNC lathes could crank plugs out by the thousands to remedy this engineering deficit!

    Don't give up on removing the old moon nock... some of them are push-fit and not glued!
     
  15. Moon

    Moon Senior Member

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    Cingold just asked me about the aluminum

    moon nocks I was planning on making. The one pictured above is my design which has very soft rounded edges and was hand made. I still have a few for testing purposes but after thinking about it quite a bit, manufacturing or selling nocks is not something I want get into, nor do I have time, you know, playing with crossbows and related equipment, etc:p Anyone that simply must have some, pm me.
     
  16. Iron Duke

    Iron Duke Senior Member

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    UPDATE

    I pulled all the plastic nocks from my 22 remaining GT Laser II's in preparation for the arrival of the new aluminum ones. (I threw one out because it shot so far away from the others) I found 7 more nocks with cracks in various states and/or stages of failure. The cracks were INSIDE the arrow at the base of the visible exterior part starting about 3/16" down and running diagonally up UNDER the "V" saddle where the string seats in the nock. Absolutely nothing visible by a normal inspection of the arrow. Funny thing is I remember visually inspecting all the nocks a while ago; strictly because they're plastic and I've read about them. Thank goodness I spoke with my guru and he/we didn't just assume it was a freak plastic nock failure.

    Now ... I had one speed nock loosen and move on my string and there's some speculation that it might have caused space alien like harmonic waves that knocked the snot out of da plastic nocks. I don't know harmonics, from ebonics but I caught the loose speed nock after about 30 shots and used my nock crimper to tighten it back on. So if that IS the case it means those arrows were likely beaten up after less than 3 shots each. Worst case scenario, even if my crimp job had the nocks misaligned or out of synchronization or "whatever" the damage took only 12 shots each arrow. While this tiny speed nock's demonism is beyond my capability to comprehend and extrapolate into chaos & mayhem on my arrows ... it might be a good idea to keep an eye on the Speed Nocks on your Strykeforce string just in case you embrace that theyre at the base of this case.

    On another front ... I had purchased an extra string with my bow so I was ready after the incident. A few calls to local bow shops to press the bow was met with We dont work on those things. Soooo ... I built a home made press out of some scrap tubing I butchered out of an old lifting jig I had laying around. While the simple model took hours to build, it functioned flawlessly and had the string changed in 60 seconds. Now Im ready for my next adventure in Strykeforce maintenance.

    THANK YOU to those who were generous enough to share your ideas with photos for home made presses! :eek:
     
  17. Xtreme cripple

    Xtreme cripple New Member

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    All I did was use a 1/8 drill bit and drill a hole in the middle. The heat from drilling will loosen the nock. Then take pliers and twist it out it's easy. I figured it out after the guys at gander mtn. said there's no way to remove them .
     

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