Crossbow Hunting.........Why We Miss

Discussion in 'Recent Articles' started by urban legend, Jan 2, 2016.

  1. urban legend

    urban legend Administrator Staff Member

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  2. ridgehunter

    ridgehunter Active Member

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    I missed this year. Why is certainly the question. My response up to this point has been that I misjudged the downhill angle and distance. That is true but only to a point. The real reason is that I got excited and I then allowed these things to factor in to the shot. This would have been the largest buck with a crossbow. The day that I no longer get excited when a buck is in front of me when I am hunting is the day when I hang my bow up. However I need to remind myself every time that I take a shot to control my breathing, settle down, and focus on the kill spot. Thanks for the reminder. Even an old dog needs to remember the basics.
     
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  3. jon.henry755

    jon.henry755 Well-Known Member

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    Good thread and while agree with the statement that we all need to be reminded occasionally about focusing on the basics, I've spent over 40 years mentally training myself that every shot I'm about to take is just another target.

    You see as a professional target archer we spend countless months, daily perfecting our form and shooting execution sequence. We usually never focus on an overall target, due to the fact that the X-ring in the center is all we're focused on. All else about the target is mentally blocked out. During the shot release we're trained to follow the path of the arrow into the target, so our bow is not lowered until after the arrow contacts the target.

    So what does this have to do with hunting or crossbows you're probably asking?

    Simple, I've always carried the exact same routine into the woods with me.

    I don't shoot at animals. I shoot at a target! I mentally don't see an animal. I learned to convince myself it's just another target. I don't need to focus on anything other than making sure my form and shot sequence is being executed flawlessly at any and every distance. I'm only concerned about burying my arrow into the exact spot I've selected before raising my bow or crossbow.

    After all has been completed, I'll then begin to access the other factors that most people are focused on prior to and during the shot.

    Getting exited is best left to either your walk-up approach or laymen. I'll guaranty anybody that my heart rate and pulse do not go up even a single beat during the shot sequence, weather it be in my yard during weekly practice shooting or in the woods execution and shot sequence is paramount to avoiding mistakes.

    Golfers spend years grooving a swing for good consistent performance. Shooters need to learn first to develop perfect form and master their shooting sequence. Then develop the control to ensure it's never broken or disrupted.


    Xbow755
     
  4. Educator

    Educator Well-Known Member

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    You are dead on Xbow755. It's all about practice both physically and mentally.

    Ed
     
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  5. 1eyedbob

    1eyedbob Active Member

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    Good thread!
     
  6. eric waldron

    eric waldron Well-Known Member

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    Have been a bow hunter many years, have taken some great trophy animals, but when I take MY shot I pay zero attention to the animal only the spot where I intend my arrow to go through. Visualizing the arrows path through the animal. This same experience has taught me to stay down in the shot, face welded to the stock and watch the arrow from the flight rail, through the animal, to the ground with locked and concentration on the little tiny spot where the arrow will pass.

    After the arrows impact I'm looking at the arrow fletch in the ground, paying no concern to the animals damage, his reaction to the arrow strike, or which way he goes after impact, I know a well struck animal in most cases plows straight ahead and the sound of the arrows impact alone tells the tale. In far too many cases the hunter jerks his head off the stock (sneaking a peek) this often occurs before the arrow ckears the flight rail. In nearly every case this results in a miss or poor impact aiming small, staying down through the arrows impact and pass through, gets it done every time. Self discipline and shot mechanics gets it done every time. JMO
     
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