Crossbow Mishaps and Mistakes

Discussion in 'Recent Articles' started by urban legend, Jan 2, 2016.

  1. urban legend

    urban legend Administrator Staff Member

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  2. Gunnar

    Gunnar Member

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    I am new to all things archery and crossbows. Thanks for the safety tips. I didn't know checking your nock was so I portant.

    Sent from my SM-T713 using Tapatalk
     
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  3. Tim50

    Tim50 Well-Known Member

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    If your nock is cracked it could cause a misfire. I like metal nocks for that reason. Hunt safe!
     
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  4. Old Summit

    Old Summit Senior Member

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    x2,I also like aluminum nocks, they are the best, hands down.
     
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  5. Old Vet

    Old Vet Active Member

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    Thanks for sharing this Urban. Understanding and remembering these important points is critical for folks new to crossbows and an excellent reminder even for those with years of experience. A crossbow releases a tremendous amount of stored energy rapidly. A failure is an up close and personal experience that can kill or maim the shooter or bystanders. Understanding your bow and performing routine inspections of both the bow, arrows, and accessories is essential to both safety and enjoyment.

    Develop a pattern in practice sessions that will lead to a habit of repition in the loading/firing sequence that includes subconscious double checks. Never load or fire a crossbow while distracted or under the influence of anything that will dull your thought process. Double check your double checks when reloading in a hunting situation.

    The "shoots like field points" reminder can't be said enough. Broadheads may shoot just like your field points, but chances are they won't impact in the same place! We owe it to the animals we hunt to be able to shoot dimes at the range we will be shooting, with the arrow/broadhead combination we will be using. Successful bowhunting is a one shot sport of precise accuracy. Close enough only counts in hand grenades, horseshoes, and nuclear weapons.
     
  6. Educator

    Educator Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Urban, great tips for all.
     
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  7. glassman_48

    glassman_48 Active Member

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    Thank you urban for this article, my kodabow I just purchased has metal flat nocks. I always wondered if an arrow once seated like my set up can slide down away from the string? If so does this happen often or with some brands of crossbows over another brand? When I walk with the compound pointing down at all, I check by pushing the arrow down on the string before I shoot. If I am target shooting off a rest, I don't.
     
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  8. JohnRoland

    JohnRoland Member

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    Thanks for sharing for some of us did not have any outdoor mentors and are learning as we go so all information is very helpful.
     
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  9. CraigVM

    CraigVM Member

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    I know I am knocking the dust off of an older thread, but it was an eye opener being such an important subject.
    I like Old Vet's suggestion about making the firing process a systematic regiment so that your mentally going through a check list each time.
    Girlfriend is an ER nurse so anytime I get involved with a hobby, she uses "once at work" stories to persuade me to be careful. She told me of a patient that came in with a multi fractured jaw / shattered teeth from a crossbow.
    :eek:o_O:(
    Apparently it happened when in the process of cocking while wearing flip flops and the stirrup slipped off of their foot. I played a mental video of myself cocking a crossbow with a cocking device, and the stirrup letting go right before the string clicks in the trigger assembly. I imagine it would make a Mike Tyson uppercut feel like a love tap. With both of my compound crossbows having the same simple "insert stirrup into the holes and lock it in with 2 set screws" design. I am going to put checking that the stirup / set screws are secure on my check list before every shooting session.
     
    Last edited: May 29, 2017
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