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Making Crossbow Bolts


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#1 Patriot

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Posted 29 April 2011 - 12:01 PM

Good Afternoon Everyone,

I think I'm in the right spot now ... so Excuse any mistakes(Posted same sugject but not in the right section).I'm New to this forum ... Not that an be used as an excuse.

I'm new to Horizontal Bow Shooting ... Hopefully you don't mind a little Humor . I use to make arrows for my compound and have a couple of questions:
1. Carbon Arrow Vs Aluminum
2. Taking a "Regular Length" arrow and cutting it to crossbow length with inserts & moon nocks. I have a whole bunch of Easton XX75 2219's... Just so the total weight is @ 425 Gr Minimum.

Take Care & God Bless

#2 Jack Pine

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Posted 29 April 2011 - 01:32 PM

Good Afternoon Everyone,

I think I'm in the right spot now ... so Excuse any mistakes(Posted same sugject but not in the right section).I'm New to this forum ... Not that an be used as an excuse.

I'm new to Horizontal Bow Shooting ... Hopefully you don't mind a little Humor . I use to make arrows for my compound and have a couple of questions:
1. Carbon Arrow Vs Aluminum
2. Taking a "Regular Length" arrow and cutting it to crossbow length with inserts & moon nocks. I have a whole bunch of Easton XX75 2219's... Just so the total weight is @ 425 Gr Minimum.

Take Care & God Bless


Patriot, welcome to the forum. Alum V Carbon is a matter of choice, they do the same thing, but carbon may be a little more efficient at it, but to me the difference in the price isn't worth it IMO. I was like you, had a bunch of aluminum, so made my own bolts. Use them up and then if you want to try carbon, go ahead. Carbon doesn't bend but it's expensive, makes me cringe every time I lose or damage one, but if you're new, go with the aluminum first till you get your feet wet. It's a matter of choice to me, some think it's more than that. The deer certainly don't care.

Jack ><>

#3 Guest_vixenmaster_*

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Posted 30 April 2011 - 09:59 AM

Yup you can cut down yer alum. 2219-2117-2216-2114 & fix them up to shoot just fine. Carbon to me is just abit easier to set up but thats just my oinion. Cost seem to be about the same over all & i am slowly going over to carbons. I still have 2dz 2216 that i have set up as heavy weight logs fer smashing shoulders when needed. I dislike an arrow not fully having a pass-through if'en i mess up & hit the scaupla. I want my arrow completely out on the ground on the far side of my shot!

#4 Yeti2008

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Posted 03 May 2011 - 09:52 AM

I am not trying to thread jack here but I have a similar question about actually buying the components for the arrows. I am very new to crossbows in fact I just got my first one last weekend. Now when it comes to putting together arrows I know that the weight is important. My question is how do you know how much the arrow actually weighs and if it will work for you? I have been having trouble tracking down the grain weight of different arrows.

#5 briarpatch

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Posted 03 May 2011 - 10:52 AM

Manufacturers should post the GPI (Grains per inch) on their website....what ones were you looking to get info on?

#6 Mike

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Posted 03 May 2011 - 11:49 AM

I use both carbon fiber and aluminum arrows with no problems.
I have slower bows (290's fps) and faster bows (400's fps), and shoot both arrows from each of my bows.
My short range shows little to no difference in alum. or C.F. arrows.
But...I have not shot out to or past 40 yards.

Mike

#7 Yeti2008

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Posted 03 May 2011 - 01:27 PM

I have been looking at the Pro Elite Carbon Crossbow Arrows but I can't seem to find the grain weight for them on the ten point site, am I just looking in the wrong place? Is there any lower limit grain weight that all crossbow arrows are at least x grains?

#8 briarpatch

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Posted 03 May 2011 - 01:52 PM

I'm no expert...but I'd guess that each manufacturer sets their onw minimum.....the TenPoint Pro Elite carbon arrows are made by Easton, I think.....there's a TenPoint rep on this site that should be able to help you on these....

#9 Sporty87

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Posted 03 May 2011 - 02:41 PM

Easton carbon power bolts weigh 10.5 gpi and the realtree power bolts weigh 11.3 gpi according to their catalog you can download off their site.

#10 larryschooley

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Posted 03 May 2011 - 02:56 PM

The Pro-Elite arrows I have are 323 grain's.

#11 mechmark

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Posted 04 May 2011 - 05:46 AM

i fill my arrows with alterna to increase the weight for my heavyweights that way i can use lighter heads and they fly real sweet also use 4 inch vanes and spitfires or shockwaves
if you have access to microballons they will probably work pretty well too.

#12 NHmsj

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Posted 04 May 2011 - 05:51 AM

Good Afternoon Everyone,

I think I'm in the right spot now ... so Excuse any mistakes(Posted same sugject but not in the right section).I'm New to this forum ... Not that an be used as an excuse.

I'm new to Horizontal Bow Shooting ... Hopefully you don't mind a little Humor . I use to make arrows for my compound and have a couple of questions:
1. Carbon Arrow Vs Aluminum
2. Taking a "Regular Length" arrow and cutting it to crossbow length with inserts & moon nocks. I have a whole bunch of Easton XX75 2219's... Just so the total weight is @ 425 Gr Minimum.

Take Care & God Bless


Here's a link that will give you Easton Aluminum shaft weights per inch. (Click on the "more" button for a weight chart.)

http://www.eastonarc...ucts/product/10

My opinion is that carbon arrows are just way over rated - and over priced. Aluminum does the job more than just well enough. I shoot 2219s and 2216s and they hit where I aim. To be honest I have bow hunted since shooting barebow with recurves and cedar arrows was the norm. We killed deer then with equipment that was well up to the task of doing so. Since that time equipment has advanced far beyond what is necessary to get the job of killing game done. But bowhunting is a sport, a hobby; and playing around with equipment is part of the fun. So, once again in my opinion, carbon is way over-kill as a hunting tool. In fact, the bows we use now are way over-kill for the task at hand. But again, it's all for fun. So if having the newest, most techno, fastest, shiniest, most whatever gear makes the sport of hunting even more fun for the user, then all that much the better. On the other hand, however, most of the gear we use is, by far, simply not necessary. A hunter can accomplish the same thing, bag game, with equipment a lot less "advanced" than what the industry generally offers today. My two cents worth is to cut those aluminum shafts down and have have at it!

Edited by NHmsj, 04 May 2011 - 08:05 AM.


#13 Gary Kehne

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Posted 04 May 2011 - 08:39 AM

I would suggest that if you are going to make your own arrows that you purchase an "grains scale". This way you will know excatly what your different conpoments will weigh,plus the total weight of your end product. They are inexpensive, and can be purchased from dealers such as, "Lost Nation Archery, Kustom King Archery, Three Rivers Archery", and at some of your local archery and gun shops.