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#1 NotaVegetarian

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Posted 27 May 2011 - 10:56 AM

What is the fastest crossbow today? How long are the arrows, and what is the weight?

#2 ben911

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Posted 27 May 2011 - 04:59 PM

the fastest is scorpyd rdt 165
165 pounds ,bolts 22'' and powered of 20'' stroke= 425 ftsec.
and it's very balance for shooting !

#3 NotaVegetarian

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Posted 28 May 2011 - 04:56 PM

If I were a rich man.

Edited by NotaVegetarian, 31 May 2011 - 09:35 PM.


#4 Raleigh Archer

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Posted 29 May 2011 - 11:04 AM

Anything over 300fps will seem fast to most archers. I love my RDT165, but I wouldn't feel handicapped with any of the more affordable options out there. I absolutely loved the Parker Tornado I had a chance to shoot, for example, but there are many other proven performers for much less than the price of a Scorpyd.

#5 ben911

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Posted 29 May 2011 - 05:38 PM

you request is speed or price??
do you have choice to by cheap one to entry incrossbow and change in some month,or year ago.
or buy the best and fastest in first....is your choice.
if you are addict hunter you change for best weapon in some delay or buy the best in first.
this is the same choice of crossbow.
the max yiu paid for quality crossbow the max you have when you change the weapon.

#6 NotaVegetarian

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Posted 30 May 2011 - 08:27 PM

Been using the same PSE Fox Fire since 1986, it still pushes my arrows @ 285. The reason I purchased this one, it was the most advance technology at the time, a compound cross bow, it was the fastest at that time with a price tag of $300. In 1986, so 25 years later the most advanced would carry a hefty price tag. Will the Scorpyd RDT 165 give 25 years or more of service?

#7 ben911

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Posted 30 May 2011 - 08:59 PM

i'm sure of more quality and tech developement in new scopyr than your 1986 model.
except every model kill!

#8 Raleigh Archer

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Posted 31 May 2011 - 09:28 AM

Been using the same PSE Fox Fire since 1986, it still pushes my arrows @ 285. The reason I purchased this one, it was the most advance technology at the time, a compound cross bow, it was the fastest at that time with a price tag of $300. In 1986, so 25 years later the most advanced would carry a hefty price tag. Will the Scorpyd RDT 165 give 25 years or more of service?

Who knows? The RDT165 is a niche bow from a small manufacturer. It is overbuilt in many ways, but nobody knows what the cumulative stress of its power may have on the limbs over the course of 25 years. Actually, that might be said for most of the faster crossbows currently in production.

However, my current RDT165 has nearly 1000 shots on it trouble free. I changed the string and cables once, and the ones on there now are still going strong.

If you need a bow to last the rest of your life, get an Excalibur or just keep your Fox Fire. If you want to step up into the 350fps+ range, you are at the mercy of the intersection of cutting edge design and high levels of stress, regardless of manufacturer.

#9 NotaVegetarian

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Posted 31 May 2011 - 01:58 PM

Raleigh Archer,

Very well stated. What is the carry weight of the RDT 165?

Maintenance has been a small issue with my PSE, the Cable has been replaced once, I have a spare on hand, the limbs have been replaced once, spares I don’t have this time. I try to shoot 3 arrows 2 times a week to stay prepped for the season, and will hog hunt with it during the off season. The arrow rest on this crossbow takes a pounding, and I am looking at other options there. But for an initial investment of $300, not including the maintenance stated above, and additional arrows, broadheads, fletching, and other miscellaneous expenses, it has been an exceptional value. I know this bow won’t last forever, and will eventually have to be mothballed. In comparison of 1986 dollars vs. today’s, $1,000 for a quality product is not really that bad. Now if only I were a rich man, not one looking at retirement!

#10 Guest_vixenmaster_*

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Posted 31 May 2011 - 05:04 PM

Darton & Bowtech strikezone have some speed fer a fair price

#11 NotaVegetarian

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Posted 31 May 2011 - 09:38 PM

Now tell me of some of the issues you folks have with them, what you would like changed, or improved.

#12 AndyC

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Posted 01 June 2011 - 02:34 AM

25 years out of any pre 90's crossbow is amazing in my books, well done!

I remember when the Foxfire and Crossfire were first introduced, state of the art at the time, though I always thought accurate string alignment on cocking, and arrow retension on the arrow rest may have been a problem. Yours has obviously served you well over the years.

Excalibur, as mentioned, are built to last a life time, and have a warranty to match. As far as a balanced combination of speed, but more importantly, accuracy, and ease of use/maintainance go, they can't be beat.

#13 deerboy

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Posted 01 June 2011 - 03:23 AM

Who knows? The RDT165 is a niche bow from a small manufacturer. It is overbuilt in many ways, but nobody knows what the cumulative stress of its power may have on the limbs over the course of 25 years. Actually, that might be said for most of the faster crossbows currently in production.

However, my current RDT165 has nearly 1000 shots on it trouble free. I changed the string and cables once, and the ones on there now are still going strong.

If you need a bow to last the rest of your life, get an Excalibur or just keep your Fox Fire. If you want to step up into the 350fps+ range, you are at the mercy of the intersection of cutting edge design and high levels of stress, regardless of manufacturer.


Agree with RA on many points... just want to add a plug for the other fine bows that Scorpyd produces such as the 'Telson' line. I have the 130 pound version and chose it strategically b/c of the reduced strain on bolts, targets and strings AND still I've clocked my bow at 390.2 fps and on cam at 386 (both on cam but at different times). The bow to me sounds quieter than my Diamond Black Ice and at 390fps avg my Crossbow Block stops the 22in bolts just fine...that's an impt advantage over the fine Scorpyd RDT 165 that scorches even my bow at 425! ... my bow also has Anti-Dry Fire which was dropped from the 165. I point out in my Video Review of the Telson (on this forum under Gear Reviews) that the Scorpyds are definetly 'Overbuilt' (the riser is a thing of beauty IMHO) as RA has said - that's good and bad. Good b/c it will last and makes the bow quieter but makes the bow quite a bit heavier as well lugging it around the deer woods. Having recently hunted with the Telson it is a bit of a toad to haul around the woods ----> BUT this is the case for just about ANY Xbow compared to a firearm or even a vertical bow. my 2 cents.

#14 Raleigh Archer

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Posted 01 June 2011 - 07:32 AM

Honestly, I'd probably pick the Telson 130 over the Scorpyd RDT165 for reasons mentioned by deerboy. NC still has a 150# minimum draw weight reg, which is why I went with the RDT165 in the first place.

I wouldn't worry about shooting "only" 390fps with a bow as quiet and well-balanced as the Scorpyd platform. However, it is STILL a niche bow from a small manufacturer, so those with no patience for what this can mean should not get a Scorpyd (or a SwissBow, or a Kodabow, or a Hickory Inline...).

#15 Cossack

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Posted 01 June 2011 - 07:49 AM

Speed is great fun and one of the first things first time buyers consider when buying a gun or bow, but, it comes at a price in both. In guns it's reflected in shorter barrel life and bullet failure-although modern monolythic bullets have largely cured the latter. In bows it's weight, string and component failure, as well as being more difficult to attain accuracy with. It seems the faster the bow, the more stress on the arrow upon release, the more stress on the arrow the more erratic flight becomes. (The stress is mostly due to current arrows not having enough spine to accommodate the rapid acceleration.) Having been up and down the scale with 5 bows, and having my first 'speed bow' blow up in my face, I've settled on bows that shoot a 400 gr arrow around 300-320 fps for most of my hunting. Plus a recurve design that's basically bullet proof, easy to maintain, can be discharged without having to shoot it and whose string can be changed without a press; not to mention (can) use a Flemish string, which is much stronger . On the plus side: no cables, cams, or slides. On the negative: recurves are wider, but not so that it has affected my ability to shoot at live targets.
I still enjoy shooting the speed bow, but hunt with a recurve to make things easier on myself. Lastly, I'd only consider a bow, esp a speed bow, that has a full lifetime warrenty and is mnufactured by a company know for great customer support. Likely you will need it, esp if your bow shop isn't local or not into serviceing crossbows..

#16 NotaVegetarian

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Posted 01 June 2011 - 03:31 PM

Drawbacks of my FoxFire, its heavy. About 9 lbs, its loud, it uses a cable, the arrows use knocks, the arrow rest is a plastic finger the arrow will fall off easily, its heavy, and did I mention its loud. However it has served me well over the years and I hope to complete this season with it as well. I do need to start looking for a suitable replacement, which is why I am asking these questions. Thanks for all of the input, and please keep it coming…..I am old I may have forgotten to ask something…

#17 Kodabow HQ

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Posted 01 June 2011 - 04:17 PM

Speed is great fun and one of the first things first time buyers consider when buying a gun or bow, but, it comes at a price in both. In guns it's reflected in shorter barrel life and bullet failure-although modern monolythic bullets have largely cured the latter. In bows it's weight, string and component failure, as well as being more difficult to attain accuracy with. It seems the faster the bow, the more stress on the arrow upon release, the more stress on the arrow the more erratic flight becomes. (The stress is mostly due to current arrows not having enough spine to accommodate the rapid acceleration.) Having been up and down the scale with 5 bows, and having my first 'speed bow' blow up in my face, I've settled on bows that shoot a 400 gr arrow around 300-320 fps for most of my hunting. Plus a recurve design that's basically bullet proof, easy to maintain, can be discharged without having to shoot it and whose string can be changed without a press; not to mention (can) use a Flemish string, which is much stronger . On the plus side: no cables, cams, or slides. On the negative: recurves are wider, but not so that it has affected my ability to shoot at live targets.
I still enjoy shooting the speed bow, but hunt with a recurve to make things easier on myself. Lastly, I'd only consider a bow, esp a speed bow, that has a full lifetime warrenty and is mnufactured by a company know for great customer support. Likely you will need it, esp if your bow shop isn't local or not into serviceing crossbows..

Note from Kodabow: Yes .... this manufacturer looks at the message boards periodically. We found this thread interesting and much of what Cossack describes is consistent with our Kodabow philosophy of making crossbows. That is keep design simple, avoid moving parts, have easy field maintenance, deliver hunting friendly speeds and high accuracy and absolutely avoid component failure.
The view expressed earlier in the thread about how some smaller companies can challenge customer patience isn't a reality for Kodabow. In some circumstances, we might be temporarily out of a particular SKU (225 Big Rhino in Black Night Weave Limbs) but that is short lived and I would hope we are viewed as highly responsive. With our AR-15 style platform style, we do a few custom configurations in our Custom area and deliveries there can be extended but those are non-typical orders. We simply don't spend much time dealing with performance problems ---- part of the reason is that our crossbows are very straightforward and 'work' ----another element is that our ADF system and automatic safety engagement trigger group are consumer friendly though we still recommend discharging an arrow into a discharge target or the ground after a hunt because of all the differing arm and body strengths among users. There are simply very few things that can go wrong. We shot a single bow for 9 days straight (all day long) at the Eastern Outdoor Show this year which is nothing ususual for us. Some observers were impressed. We are working hard and hopefully establishing a solid reputation .... yes, we are underexposed to a degree but we really don't think of ourselves as a niche player or having an operation that would test customer's patience. Maybe the oppposite would be more accurate. If you haven't looked at us in awhile, please check us at www.kodabow.com or on Facebook. / Chuck Matasic - President