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THE best crossbow for handicapped hunter?


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#1 dans

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Posted 25 June 2011 - 10:04 AM

I have two bad shoulders and need a crossbow that is light weight, the lighter the better, accurate, has a cocking device I don't need to pull, good trigger, the faster and more powerful the better. I am talking a once in a lifetime buy as I am 64 years old. Also need a great scope. Cost is not a consideration. I just need input from hunters who are using these crossbows in the field. All the manufacturers hype is too confusing.

#2 FLA-XBOW

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Posted 25 June 2011 - 11:28 AM

Check out excalibur and ten-point i i use an excal, they have a cranking device available as does ten-point , just try them all out. Im very happy with my excal but its up to you.

#3 Johnie H

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Posted 25 June 2011 - 12:29 PM

I think a Stealth XLT would be a good choice. Very accurate, quite,highly maneuverable,only about 14 inches wide when cocked. Scope that comes with it is good, but I think if you want really one of the best scopes, get a Hawke XB30.I own 13 top of the line crossbows. 4 of them have the XB30. If I could have only one crossbow, it would be the Stealth XLT. P.S. Tenpoint is one of the best,if not the best for help and service

The Stealth weighs 7# 6 oz. Remember all crossbows have net weight published. I realy like the Excalibur brand,I have 5., but keep in mind they are all 36" wide.If you are handicaped,36" wide is hard to swing around compared to 24". With my Excaliburs, I'm always bumping into things. The Excalibur is a great crossbow, keep in mind that it has no anti dry fire device. Some people don't need them, but a lot of dry fires happen. Hope this helps.

Edited by Johnie H, 25 June 2011 - 07:20 PM.


#4 Meat Hunter

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Posted 25 June 2011 - 01:30 PM

Dans,

You specifically mentioned, “…the lighter the better...”. I understand your needs completely.

In my opinion, I do not think that you will find a lighter “real hunting” crossbow than an Excalibur. +- 6 lbs. mass weight -- Accuracy, dependability and warranty are sterling.

There are some third rate crossbows coming out of China that weigh in the +- 6 lb. mass weight range, but these are not what you are looking for.

You may wish to consider, that whatever the advertised mass weight is; when you add a scope rings, base, quiver & arrows and sling, you will add another +- 2 lbs.

Best,
Meat Hunter

#5 dans

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Posted 28 June 2011 - 01:26 PM

Thanks for all the replies. Now I will just have to go and handle some of them and make up my mind.

#6 briarpatch

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Posted 28 June 2011 - 01:50 PM

one thing that will likely sway your decision would be the AcuDraw on the TenPoint...I believe its the best cranking system out there....which, by the way...can be mounted on an Excalibur, too

#7 cantremembermyid

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Posted 28 June 2011 - 04:47 PM

AccuDraw has worked well for me. Built right into the stock.

As best as I can tell, no other manufacturer offers something comparable (except may be PSE). I wonder if there are patent licensing issues.

#8 quadkiller

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Posted 28 June 2011 - 04:53 PM

i'm disabled myself. i'd try the new parker concorde. it is selfcocking with a co2 cartridge. it is a little heavier, but if hunting on the ground it's the ticket! it's small, compact and very quiet. if you buy an aluminum co2 tank instead of steal it takes of a pound. do yourself a favor and go see this bow. THE THING COCKS WITH A PUSH OF A BUTTON!

Edited by quadkiller, 28 June 2011 - 04:54 PM.


#9 Johnie H

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Posted 28 June 2011 - 08:25 PM

i'm disabled myself. i'd try the new parker concorde. it is selfcocking with a co2 cartridge. it is a little heavier, but if hunting on the ground it's the ticket! it's small, compact and very quiet. if you buy an aluminum co2 tank instead of steal it takes of a pound. do yourself a favor and go see this bow. THE THING COCKS WITH A PUSH OF A BUTTON!

Trouble is: More to go wrong.

#10 quadkiller

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Posted 29 June 2011 - 12:05 PM

this might not be for you johnie, but for those who have trouble cocking a crossbow it's an awesome step forward in technology. i've seen this bow in person and it is fast and quiet and compact. 300fps. with only a 9 3/4in. draw.

#11 original45

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Posted 05 July 2011 - 02:48 PM

i have spinal disc problems and too are looking for options ,barnett ghost 400 has been recomendid to me,any thoughts ,

#12 Lightfoot

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Posted 05 July 2011 - 03:32 PM

I have two bad shoulders and need a crossbow that is light weight, the lighter the better, accurate, has a cocking device I don't need to pull, good trigger, the faster and more powerful the better. I am talking a once in a lifetime buy as I am 64 years old. Also need a great scope. Cost is not a consideration. I just need input from hunters who are using these crossbows in the field. All the manufacturers hype is too confusing.


If Weight and speed are criteria, try looking at the Middleton 315 which is just under 5 lbs. If size is an issue as well, try looking at the Hickery Creek in line crossbow about the same weight but can be shot vertical, or horizontal according to your preferences. you can use a crank to draw it as well.

Im not sure whether your familiar with draw lock devices or not, but Pullin Archery also has some setups.
They specialize in bows and equipment(in line crossbows as well)for the disabled or handicapped. There are also many companies who offer hunting accessories for handicapped or physcally challenged.

BTW - I dont think the Ghost is considered to be lightweight. BTW regular bows have riser/limbs at end of rail but a reverse draw (inswinger) has a different setup so the weight when holding is also different. Holding a few pounds close to the body is easier than at arms length.

Edited by SPECIALIZED, 05 July 2011 - 03:42 PM.


#13 BigBowMan

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Posted 05 July 2011 - 04:34 PM

We can all give our personal opinions, but in the end you must make that decision. The best advice is to go handle and shoot as many different bows that you can to help with your decision. Good Luck and Happy Hunting! :thumbsu:

#14 j3cub

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Posted 21 October 2013 - 03:49 PM

One thing about physical issues, they are personal and no one's problems are the same as anyone else's and so one has to pick a crossbow or Draw-loc type device to fit their personal needs.  Look at the crossbows as mentioned above, but don't forget to check some off bands like the Draw-loc and Hickery Creek Archery's new vertical crossbow.  I just did a review on the Draw-loc published in the Horizontal Bowhunter, Fall 2013 issue.  This is a great product which one can put on a bow they already have and hunt like you have a crossbow but feel like you are still using your vertical bow. It can be drawn with one or both hands so a person with only one usable arm can still shoot it. Hickery Creek Archery has a new crossbow out which I will be testing in Afirca this Spring. Clearly the oppertunities for handicapped archers are getting better and more inovative. Those who might want to try a Draw-loc or Jerry Golf's new crossbow should contact Jerry at drawloc@gmail.com.