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How many bolts do you own-use per season

Bolts Easton 2219

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#1 Krealitygroup

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 08:23 AM

Whatsup y'all

I've been purchasing up old crossbow gear for the the Last month.. So.. I'm looking to have a boat lost of 2219's made. Because access to the old Jennings nocks could eventually change. I wanted to stockpile about 10 seasons worth of bolts. How many bolts do you go through in a season with preseason sighting in/practice?

#2 Gabowman

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 09:20 AM

I havent bought any additional arrows for my crossbow yet and only have the 3 that came with it. Been pondering whether I want to go with alum or stick with the carbons. I havent shot at any deer with the crossbow but the carbons have been one tough arrow with the bag target. (I am shooting an Excalibur with their carbon arrows-called Firebolts.) I may TRY some alum 2216's just because of the price but wont rule out going back to carbons.

#3 bobbyd1947

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 01:01 PM

I have a dozen arrows. I don't shoot at the same target more than once. They should last me a lifetime. My discharge arrow is an alum. My hunting carbon. I also have firenocks on my hunting arrows and don't feel I will be losing any soon.

#4 dropzone

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 02:31 PM

I have a dozen arrows. I don't shoot at the same target more than once. They should last me a lifetime. My discharge arrow is an alum. My hunting carbon. I also have firenocks on my hunting arrows and don't feel I will be losing any soon.

Bobby my friend I am proud of you and I am assuming you know what I am talking about. I have assorted brand arrows 1 1/2 doz Gold tip laser II, 1 doz victory xbolt, A few carbon express, Horton carbons that I have never shot and a dozen or so aluminum 2219. All the carbon's except the carbon express are hunting arrow set up's and I also use aluminum 2219 for a discharge arrow. I quit shooting at the same spot after ruining a couple Gold tip's.

Edited by dropzone, 19 January 2013 - 02:32 PM.


#5 bobbyd1947

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 03:25 PM

Bobby my friend I am proud of you and I am assuming you know what I am talking about. I have assorted brand arrows 1 1/2 doz Gold tip laser II, 1 doz victory xbolt, A few carbon express, Horton carbons that I have never shot and a dozen or so aluminum 2219. All the carbon's except the carbon express are hunting arrow set up's and I also use aluminum 2219 for a discharge arrow. I quit shooting at the same spot after ruining a couple Gold tip's.

When I had verticals I had hundreds of arrows. No longer GT laser pro II's for hunting. But also have a dozen 2219's that I think I will be selling.
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#6 Krealitygroup

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 08:31 PM

Bobby. Let me know.

#7 bobbyd1947

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 08:36 PM

Bobby. Let me know.

They are the 20" 2219 Easton Magnum's with flat nocks.

#8 xbow755

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Posted 20 January 2013 - 03:25 AM

Hi All,
I'm not sure if I should really get involved in this thread because i tend to do a lot more shooting usually than most people due to the fact that I do so much testing of products for articles, but I thought I'd just mention a few thoughts that play into the equasion of How Many Arrows Does One Person Need?

Keep in mind that if aluminum arrows are your thing, then you natuarally need two or three times more than if using carbon. This is due to the fact that aluminum fatigues over far less sots than carbon. When this occurs the arrow begins to lose its straightness and can also devleop fractures due to becoming more brittle over time.

Carbon in the same light can withstand much more (in the thousands) of oscillations and target impacts before any negative effects. As the modulous of carbon has become much denser and newer adhesives were being used, their level of straightness and strength continues to improve in big percentages. The negative side is their also very expensive.

The point is even using good nocks like the Firenocks doesn't insure anything. Keep in mind that all synthetic materials are subject to deterioration from Ultraviolet light. This means the more time your nocks are exposed to direct sunlight the weaker they become over time. After a certain a point they may fracture on the shot. Whn this happens, you well be kissing that arrow goodbye depending on where it ends up. I'm not trying to scare anybody into anything. I'm just trying to get you to understand that if these things haven't happened yet, they will and are unavoidable.

The more you shoot, the more often you run into these things. I usually end up having to replace at least two or three of my arrows each season due to loss from nock fractures. I end up often having to replace two or three arrows due to either pass thru's on animals that get busted on rocks or other objects or the deer just decides that he's going to fall on that side of his body or bust my arrow shafts on trees as he runs. Hunting has its own set of reasons why a certain number of arrow shafts are not coming back with you.

When it takes you 25 to 30 hours of work to custom match and build a set and your shooting the highest quality shafts you can find even before you put a broadhead on your arrows you can easily be spending $25 to $30 per arrow and possibly more. At the same time arrows to a crossbow are like bullets to gun except at a different price point. You wouldn't own a great shooting rifle and only one box of ammo if they were custom loads, would you?

Like Highlander, I have several sets of arrows that are rotated for different purposes. I would guess I have about 7 or 8 dozen between my competition arrows, my general target arrows and my hunting arrows. Even my hunting arrows are broken into two different groups of a dozen each. I have a set used for strictly two blade fixed broadheads for very large big game and I have a second set of mechanicals used for turkey and general whitetail hunting.

It's a bit easier for me than for many people because I have been making arrows for over 30 years, so in the winter when things get to cold to go out and play, I like to set in my work room and build arrows or clean, tune or repair my equipment for the upcoming year.

If you had more arrows, you'd easily be able to take a set out of operation for a period of time and actually do things like refletch with new vanes or remove the nocks and replace them better quality ones while at the same time weight balance each arrow to exactly the same weight in grains.

I hear everybody asking questions about new scopes to be more accurate and what new arrows will give me better performance, what broadheads shoot the best? These are all accuracy improvement questions and issues, but when it comes right down to it, most people are not even doing the basic things needed to attain good shooting accuracy with what they already own. If you don't build the right foundation to start with, all the new arrows or new scopes or anything else you buy won't help get you into the center of a target at medium to long distances no matter what you do.

My suggestion is to take your time but purchase enough decent quality arrows to give yourself plenty of ammunition so you can set yourself up with quality finished sets that allow you to work with them and tune them for whatever purposes you have in mind. Never believe they are going to last for a long time. If they do, count your blessing and keep going, but as the old saying goes, "nothing lasts forever except death and taxes"!

Good shooting!

Regards,

Xbow755

#9 Krealitygroup

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Posted 20 January 2013 - 07:27 AM

Thanks xbow. I understand.

#10 hikerman

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Posted 20 January 2013 - 11:05 AM

I usually buy a doz shafts a year. I make my own aluminum, most times my buddy will buy half. I don't frat if I loose a few target shooting. Some people into guns go amp crazy, can't hurt to have extra arrows.

#11 xbow755

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 02:04 AM

hikerman,
Not bad, unless your shooting an awful lot, you probably don't over fatigue your aluminum, so each year you have new fresh ones to add to your stock. It also sounds like after doing this a while, your not in any danager of running low.

If it works, don't fix it!

Xbow755

#12 BUMARMBOW

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 05:09 PM

When you buy a dozen arrows,how many out of that dozen fly differant or off compaired to the rest of them.I just got my crossbow and been shooting the 3 arrows that came with it.2 are almost Robin hooding everytime but that third arrow is always off by 2inches. Can i expect this when I buy a dozen and get maybe 3 or so out of the dozen to do the same ?

#13 bobbyd1947

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 05:21 PM

I had a dozen of GT laser pro II's made and they are all within less than a grain apart in weight. I numbered them and shot them and every single one is right on the mark. Even out to 40 yds. I'm happy

#14 bowriter

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 05:49 PM

I shoot maybe 6-8 a year and have to replace probably half of those. So, I go through four a year. I try to keep 10-12 ready to go at all times with hunting heads. I have six I use just for practice.

#15 Redclub

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 07:30 PM

I usually have at least a dozen for the primary bow and lesser amounts for the rest. A couple can shoot the same arrows (bow-tech and Scorpyd) but the Ten-Points need a flat nock.

#16 BuckBrush

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 02:16 PM

4 practice tipped & 8 hunting tipped

#17 Highlander

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 02:38 PM

Whatsup y'all

I've been purchasing up old crossbow gear for the the Last month.. So.. I'm looking to have a boat lost of 2219's made. Because access to the old Jennings nocks could eventually change. I wanted to stockpile about 10 seasons worth of bolts. How many bolts do you go through in a season with preseason sighting in/practice?


I wouldn't recommend 10 seasons worth. Things change too quickly in this hobby & your opinions regarding hunting arrows may change. ;)

For a guy that just sites in his xbow before hunting and then hunts for the season, I don't believe you will damage 12 arrows per season, some get buy with 6 arrows and still have all but perhaps a few left over. Do you feel lucky? :lol:

I don't believe the 2219 arrows are going to disappear any time soon. If your worried about the nocks, then do stock up on them in bulk. You won't feel so bad if you do decide to trade in that xbow in a couple of years for one you like more, perhaps another good buy on a used one. :)

Edited by Highlander, 22 January 2013 - 03:00 PM.

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#18 xbow755

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 02:51 PM

BUMARMBOW and others,
The most common reason for certain arrows grouping tightly versus others being "fliers" or Drifters is typically due to the fact their spines are not aligned the same as the ones that group correctly. This deals with the nock alignment to each arrows spine. In order to easily correct this problem one must use a spine testing machine (such as a RAM QC Spine tester). You must identify and mark the stiff side of the arrows spine and then rotate all nocks so they are in the same alignment to the spine on each arrow. This process insures that each arrows oscillitaion timing (flexing on arrow launch) is taking place in the same exact direction.

Imagine, if you will what happens when each arrow is flexing in entirely different directions each time one shoots? If the impact point on your target is usually a difference in elevation at medium or long distances, this would indicate a likely weight difference between your arrow shafts, but otherwise, it's related to spine to nock alignment differences.

Regards,

Xbow755

#19 bobbyd1947

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 03:10 PM

BUMARMBOW and others,
The most common reason for certain arrows grouping tightly versus others being "fliers" or Drifters is typically due to the fact their spines are not aligned the same as the ones that group correctly. This deals with the nock alignment to each arrows spine. In order to easily correct this problem one must use a spine testing machine (such as a RAM QC Spine tester). You must identify and mark the stiff side of the arrows spine and then rotate all nocks so they are in the same alignment to the spine on each arrow. This process insures that each arrows oscillitaion timing (flexing on arrow launch) is taking place in the same exact direction.

Imagine, if you will what happens when each arrow is flexing in entirely different directions each time one shoots? If the impact point on your target is usually a difference in elevation at medium or long distances, this would indicate a likely weight difference between your arrow shafts, but otherwise, it's related to spine to nock alignment differences.

Regards,

Xbow755

Xbow755; Am I just lucky or what? I had a dozen GT Laser Pro II's made up and everyone of them are right on the mark all the way out to 40 yards. I have flat nocks if that helps with your answer. Thanks bobbyd

#20 Highlander

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 03:49 PM

Bobby,

You and Xbow755 are not on the same wavelength. You're talking apples compared to tomatoes. ;)

Xbow is talking about shooting out 100 yards or more for extreme accuracy & your talking only 40 yards for hunting. 40 yards is hardly a long enough distance to worry about the extremes Jon is talking about, when you're talking using GT Laser Pro II's which should be match reasonably close for very reasonable groups at 40 yards. See what happens when you shoot your GT laser Pro II's out at 100 yards unless you match them very closely for spine, straightness and weight. :)

It's like talking shooting deer up to say 150 yards with a rifle compared to talking long range hunting at 600 yards. The amo is quite different for what will work at the two ranges. Of course you can use the long range very precise custom made amo at 100 yards, but is the additional expense worth it to many hunters. Out of the box amo works quite well for them at the normal hunting range of under say 150 yards. ;)

Keep in mind Xbow755 was a pro archery shooter and naturally demands nothing but the extreme best out of his setup. Most hunters don't need this type of accuracy, but if you read what Jon says, you will begin the understanding between cheap carbons and the better carbons and the highend $30+ carbons. Take your pick for what your intended purpose is and if you have the buget and care enough about extreme accuracy than use the custom load cartridge for just deer hunting. Even the $30.00+ carbons need a lot of time spent on them matching to as JOn does 1/10 grain and sorting for super fine spine to get the accuracy he wants out beyond 100 yards. Some how, I can't see Jon happy with nothing but the ultimate arrow in accuracy and he will tell you how to achieve it. To each their own, but listening to Jon helps to understand the difference. :)

Edited by Highlander, 22 January 2013 - 04:10 PM.