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Best Features for Hog Hunting


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#1 chodenut

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 12:53 PM

I have been lurking for a while and decided it is time to get serious about my first crossbow.

My suburban neighborhood has had its boughts with feral hogs destroying landscaping and contributing to auto accidents. Trapping has been used in the past for temporary success but they are returning. Several of us have permission to hunt pigs on the wooded land adjacent to our subdivision but the use of firearms is not an option.

What would the site have to say about which bow characteristics are the most important for hunting feral hogs?

Speed (what is enough, is more better)
Optics
Weight
Physical size
Camo
etc.

[tongue-in-cheek] Anybody ever see a crossbow with a bayonet? just in case my ccw and spare magazines run empty [/tongue-in-cheek]

Thanks,
CN

#2 bobbyd1947

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 01:28 PM

Welcome to CBN

#3 Highlander

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 01:49 PM

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I have a hog hunt planned in late May, I'll be interested in the responses from experienced hunters. ;)

#4 Joe171 ( DR FRANKENBOW )

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 01:53 PM

As Well welcome to The Crossbow Nation
B ayonet I like the idea :diablo:
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#5 bobbyd1947

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 02:28 PM

THE MOUNT

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#6 Joe171 ( DR FRANKENBOW )

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 02:32 PM

THE MOUNT

DAMMMM Bobby
I think I dated her at one time when I use to take a drink or 2 or ??? :lol:

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#7 Stalker

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 02:39 PM

Welcome to CBN. Your questions depend on lots of variables.Range and the size of the hogs being the most important in my opinion.I have not hunted hogs yet but plan on it in the near future.From what I have read hogs vital areas are tough to penetrate without a good accurate shot so optics would be important as well as kinetic energy and broadheads for penetrating bone.Speed isn't a big factor in my opinion for close range shots 0-30 yards but it does play in to the kinetic energy of a arrow.I also look forward to other posts from experienced hog hunters.Great question.I would think a bow shooting 300fps with the right arrow and broadhead should do the job on average size hogs.

Edited by Stalker, 01 February 2013 - 02:46 PM.


#8 chodenut

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 03:16 PM

Thanks to all for your welcome messages and responses.

To answer Stalker's questions, the longest shot I would have is right around 40 yards. Most likely I would not take any over 30 yards with a crossbow. Typically the pigs are around 70-150 lb with the occasional 200-220 lb male making an appearance.

After skinning several pigs taken on a deer lease,I noticed that mainly the large males tend to have the very dense hide around their shoulder area that many refer to as "plates". I have always preferred heavier projectiles (momentum retention) to light (kinetic energy) for that reason, but solved that concern with my rifle by getting both mass and velocity (opting for a Rem 7mm mag over the 270 Winchester) I realize that is overkill but I will have no doubts about the sufficiency of the tool and that peace of mind is valuable for me when I pull the trigger. I will probably gravitate toward that again with a crossbow but would like to hear the voices of experience before deciding.

CN

#9 Highlander

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 03:26 PM

One vid I found helpful while doing my research for my upcoming hog hunt is this video:

Heavy arrows translate into more momentum. You just need to find the right trade-off between weight and speed. ;)

Even the slower xbows will work with the right arrow combination The proof is in the pudding where you read hogs are killed with recurve bows with the right combo arrow.


Edited by Highlander, 01 February 2013 - 03:31 PM.


#10 mrmojorisan

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 04:14 PM

As stated above, stay with a heavier arrow. I would try and use a mechanical with a good cutting diameter... the new NAP Killzone Crossbow Broadheads look pretty nice. Remember a hogs vitals tend to sit a little higher than they do on a deer. So when aiming, in reference to the height of your shot, aim dead center and about 3" behind the front shoulder (2" on a smaller hog). This is to do your best to ensure you don't hit the shoulder itself as they are pretty stout. Some hogs can get pretty fiesty which allows for a huge adrenaline rush. In that case, make sure to give it plenty of time to expire. Some may go down almost immediately and others may run for a bit and sit there still alive. Approaching too soon will only make them run some more, making your tracking time a heck of a lot longer.

Edited by mrmojorisan, 01 February 2013 - 04:14 PM.


#11 jac

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 07:42 PM

here is the best feature in hog hunting..

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#12 Stalker

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 08:03 PM

here is the best feature in hog hunting..

Whats in the pot? and how long til its ready!!? :p

#13 jac

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 08:09 PM

the squeal...

#14 5Rangers

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 09:37 PM

In addition to what everyone else has brought to light, I would stress which broad head is used. My bro stuck 4 different pigs with a 100 grn Rage mechanical, each had minimal blood trails that led to NO PIG. That same Rage BH had no problem taking a deer with a good, not great, blood trail. On the other hand, I was using a Grizz Trick 125 grn fixed. 3 arrows resulted in 3 kills, each with massive blood trails. In my judgement, broad head selection is critical if you want to recover the hog.

#15 Delta-Stan

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 09:39 PM

Hi and welcome to the CBN

I think you found the right place to get answers to all of your questions.

Over here in Germany bowhunting is illegal but I will go hog-hunting in Arkansas this october. Some of my friends over there shoot many hogs with the bow every year and they told me a lot about it. I know that they know what they are doing.

I had the very same questions that you have. My friends told me to use a a crossbow with a speed of around 300-350 fps. That bow will still be powerfull enough even if you use heavier arrows and broadheads......and you should use them.

Too bad, over here I can't get any WEREWOLF broadheads. They are fixed blades and will do their job on any hog. I got me some GERMAN KINETICS 150 grains, same kind of broadheads, razorsharp out of the box. Next broadhead of that fixed-blade-family would be a HUNOR broadhead. All of them are COC broadheads.

MAGNUS STINGERS are good ones as well but I think the blade is very thin and it might bend when hitting heavy bones on a hog. It happened to me once shooting at a foam-target.

BTW, MAGNUS and WEREWOLF got a lifetime warranty !!

And not to overlook them Slick Tricks.......tough broadheads and some of my buddies trust them under all conditions.

There are a lot of mechanical broadheads out there and they will do their job as well......but I believe in Murphy's law.
If I had to use one of them......no question, GRIM REAPERS !

BUT.....even the best broadhead does not work placed at the wrong spot. My buddies keep telling me that the most important part is to know where the vitals are and good shot-placement every time.

For that reason I practice a lot with them GK, SLICK TRICKS and GRIM REAPERS.. By changing the inserts of your arrow you can get the same F.O.C. on all of your arrows, and to tell the truth, I prefer heavy arrows and broadheads because I was told not to shoot at a hog if it is not closer than 25 yards. That is the distance where all of my different arrows group very good, a must for an ethical kill.

Be safe

Stan

Edited by Delta-Stan, 02 February 2013 - 12:12 AM.


#16 Krealitygroup

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 10:58 PM

Hello and Welcome

I'm like you, looking to learn. I use a 511 grain arrow, with a 140 grain fixed blade Bear Razorhead. The heavy fixed blade tends to fare better on harder targets. The boars shield is tough as nails.

#17 Corky

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 11:17 PM

Anyone interested in feral pig hunting might want to listen to Guide Girl... She's guide hog hunts and has killed tons...

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#18 BlackBoarDown

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 01:55 PM

opinions vary .. I have been using an old Horton TRT175 for 6 years and it throws a 425 gr arrow tipped with a Atom razorwire broad head @ 275 fps . Slow compared to the the latest bows on the market. The only trouble I have had is finding the larger pigs after a bad shot placement. Good optics is a must and because most of the pig activity is at night a tactical light is a plus.
Shot placement is the key ! a quartering away shot on a large boar is a must ! You can get away with a broadside shot on a sow or a smaller football but not on a large boar.
The CAMX bow is the best I can say that I have handled in the field . I wish they offered a lighted retical with the scope package. Mounting a Bowlite tactical light on it was a challenge unless you just velcroed to the scope . I was left a CAMX to play with for a bit and am now in love. Will have to retire the Horton when the next large paycheck comes my way.
Bottom line is : you can get away with using a slower bow and an arrow 425 - 455 is heavy enough. Broadheads are a thing of preference , when you find one that works for you , stick with it . I like the Atoms because they give the same POI as target points and I don't have to tune / retune for the broadheads. Good shot placement is the main factor !
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#19 Shiloh

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 05:07 PM

Before I answer the original question, I’d like to qualify my response. My husband and I own and operate Shiloh Ranch Hunting Camp, wild hog hunting in Oklahoma. We’ve both been bowhunting most of our lives, have been outfitting hog hunts here in Oklahoma for the past 13 years, and my husband for another 20 years in Texas before that. Our guests kill between five and six hundred feral hogs each year on our ranch. For the past thirteen years, we’ve been able to recover many hogs that were hit bad and unrecoverable by the hunter, either through the use of our blood trailing jagdterrier or by shooting wounded animals that were seen in the days or weeks after they were initially shot. This way, we are able to determine exactly what went wrong (I also have a background in Veterinary Medicine and am intimately familiar with the anatomy of hogs as we did research on them for several years before moving to Oklahoma). Our findings have shown that a vast majority of wounded hogs were simply the result of improper shot placement. A lot of folks think they can shoot hogs like they would a deer or elk because that’s what they’re used to shooting. A hog’s anatomy is quite different from other North American game animals in that their vitals lie much LOWER and further FORWARD. If you shoot a hog behind the elbow, then you most likely will hit the stomach. The heart and lungs also lie much lower in the chest. If you hit midway up the animal’s chest, then you will be above the lungs and in either the backstrap muscle or the spinal process (a bony protruberance that forms the “hump” over a hog’s shoulders)- neither of which are immediately mortal wounds.

Additionally, it is of utmost importance to get enough penetration to hit both lungs on a hog. If you don’t hit the heart, aorta or other artery and only hit one lung then the hog isn’t likely to die the same day you’re looking for it. In fact we’ve butchered many hogs with one lung all shriveled up with a broadhead in it. Most other species will die if you hit only one lung, because both lungs are enclosed within the same cavity. If the animal doesn’t die from exsanguination (blood loss) then it will die from a bilateral pneumothorax (inability to breathe). Hogs on the other hand, will keep on going with just one good lung. Just like a human with one collapsed lung can still drive themselves to the hospital, a hog with one lung will keep right on hauling the mail! Knowing this, it’s important to have adequate kinetic energy for your arrow to pass through the animal and preferably leave an exit wound so you’ll have a bloodtrail to follow. For that reason, we do not even allow mechanical broadheads to be used on hogs. They simply don’t penetrate adequately, especially when compared to a fixed-blade broadhead. We’ve performed tests on freshly killed hogs and have shot them with high poundage bows, at close range with a mechanical only to have it penetrate a few inches. When the same hog was shot with a fixed blade head, the arrow usually blew through the animal and into the woods behind it. Also, you want to avoid taking quartering shots. With the lungs lying so far forward, it’s almost impossible to hit both lungs quartering without hitting bone. Sure, folks have killed hogs by taking quartering shots, but it’s usually because they got lucky and hit the heart or aorta (and yes, it’s pure luck when you hit a 3” target on an animal that never stands still!)

This brings up the subject of the “shield” on mature boars. This shield is basically just a layer of cartilage that builds up over the ribs of mature boar hogs only. It’s not found on sows or young boars. With age, the boar develops this cartilage to protect its vitals from the tusks of other boars. This shield can best be compared to a Kevlar vest. While it will stop many bullets, a sharp cut-to-tip broadhead will slice right through the cartilage. This is where we recommend low-poundage shooters not shoot big boar hogs. Also, this cartilaginous shield does not extend to the lower part of the chest where we recommend shooting. It is much thicker higher up on the ribcage. So here’s what you have to do to kill a hog: wait until the animal’s perfectly broadside and the foreleg closest to you is straight up and down, or better yet forward and then shoot directly above the elbow, in the bottom third of the chest. If you do that, you’ll be putting pork chops in the freezer! Lastly, here’s a picture of a hog that was shot here recently that shows perfect shot placement.

I hope I answered your questions adequately.

Cheryl Napper /Shiloh Ranch Hunting Camp

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#20 blackhawk611

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 08:03 PM

yep i thinnk you did well a good crossbow wiyh a sharp muzzy broadhead will do nicely.

Edited by blackhawk611, 02 February 2013 - 08:03 PM.