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Discussion Starter #1
Novice hunter here with only one year under my belt. The challenge I have is walking to my still hunt area on my property in northern Wisconsin without making much noise. The forest is covered with dry leaves, which makes it very difficult to walk around without alerting the deer. If I wait for wind or rain to dampen the noise I make, my days could be limited. If I only take several steps, wait and then continue, it will take me all day to get to where the deer are. Snow helps, but that's not always guaranteed during hunting season. Any advice for this clueless beginning hunter???
 

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Not knowing all of the details on your area, It is next to impossible to walk in a woods, even wet ground or snow to muffle any foot steps, and not alert any deer in the near vicinity. If you are hunting from a set tree stand or ground blind, I would just try to arrive a little earlier and walk at a steady rate to that stand. You may spook deer that are close by, but usually everything calms down and back to normal in about 20-30 minutes. Good Luck
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks, appreciate your response. Almost my entire property is wooded with a single atv trail that winds through it.
 

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Fortunately I pick my spots where I can enter them through the pasture with little noise from leave noise. I avoid those area were leaves are deep due to what you said but sometimes it isn't possible So approach only days when leaves are wet. You could use a rake to if you have the energy to make a path. Also I will move fallen climbs or even overhanging branches to prevent touching them or have them hit me in the face.Even in the higher pasture I clear a path to prevent contact with vegetation so scene trail is smaller. Sometimes I use a machete or wet wacker. Of course one wants to be careful and make it not to alarming for the deer.
One ground blind located in a tall cedar thicket on the south side of a ridge were less oak leaves are present and the walk in is silent.
Good luck,
Spot
 
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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks. My home is in the deep woods, except for a long driveway, so this is what I face when going out to hunt. This is on the atv trail through the woods.
29F6C183-2F89-4B96-B04A-41011F6F9347.jpeg
 

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I clean a trail to my stands about now but I'm not dealing with that many leaves. Looks like you have a lot of leaves, I'd move slow and pause from time to time. I'm not a fan of sitting in the dark so I normally get in my stand about shooting light. Nobody hunts around me so I will even stalk in to my spot at times. Good Luck
 

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I would head to my spot early and walk slow and take frequent pauses as I went. Plan to be on stand at least 30 minutes to allow things to calm down. An added benefit to a slower approach is less sweat build up for a more comfortable hunt with less deer spooking scent.
 

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When it's impossible to be quiet, try to sound like a deer instead....I took a muley buck in his bed at less than 30 yds after a very noisey walk into this bedding area in crunchy snow, louder then dry leaves..... I had just watched and listened to a doe walking by me earlier and noticed how she'd drop her hooves down without the slightest effort to be quiet.....then I'd watched and listened to the rediculous unnatural sounds of my buddies coming up to me just as the doe dissapeared, go figure!!!. So I started doing the same as the doe. I'd plunk my boots down flat, instead of rolling the heel first....then I'd stop like a feeding deer and even break twigs off bushes when I could, to sound like a deer feeding it's way into the bedding area. And I'd add a little bit of 'talk' with a grunt tube. Keep'n it very natural, and not overdone!!!
If ya can't beat em, join em!!!!! Sound like 'em, think like 'em, and you'll kill 'em!!!!
Hope this helps!!
KTK
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for your response. Not sure my size 14 boots could ever sound like a deer (maybe like a bear!) but I suppose I could try if nothing else works.
 

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Many years ago I had a friend that always seem to kill more and bigger deer than the rest of our hunting friends. He employed a technique he called “slippin’ around” in the woods. I asked him one time what his secret was and he told me that his dad, also an excellent hunter, taught him how to “slip around” in the woods like a deer.
We hunters always seem to be in a hurry to get to where we think the deer are when in reality we are just spooking deer that are already in the same area we’re in.
Learn to “slip around” in the woods making the same sounds a deer makes as it travels through the woods.
 

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Just watch out where you step. When the woods are alive other animals make more noise than you think. Walk slow then slow down more. I still hunt and walk through much thicker stuff than the picture you posted. Just avoid loud, fast noise and you will be alright. Keep on eye on the wind and if possible move when the wind is blowing.
 

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When it's impossible to be quiet, try to sound like a deer instead....I took a muley buck in his bed at less than 30 yds after a very noisey walk into this bedding area in crunchy snow, louder then dry leaves..... I had just watched and listened to a doe walking by me earlier and noticed how she'd drop her hooves down without the slightest effort to be quiet.....then I'd watched and listened to the rediculous unnatural sounds of my buddies coming up to me just as the doe dissapeared, go figure!!!. So I started doing the same as the doe. I'd plunk my boots down flat, instead of rolling the heel first....then I'd stop like a feeding deer and even break twigs off bushes when I could, to sound like a deer feeding it's way into the bedding area. And I'd add a little bit of 'talk' with a grunt tube. Keep'n it very natural, and not overdone!!!
If ya can't beat em, join em!!!!! Sound like 'em, think like 'em, and you'll kill 'em!!!!
Hope this helps!!
KTK
Many years ago I had a friend that always seem to kill more and bigger deer than the rest of our hunting friends. He employed a technique he called “slippin’ around” in the woods. I asked him one time what his secret was and he told me that his dad, also an excellent hunter, taught him how to “slip around” in the woods like a deer.
We hunters always seem to be in a hurry to get to where we think the deer are when in reality we are just spooking deer that are already in the same area we’re in.
Learn to “slip around” in the woods making the same sounds a deer makes as it travels through the woods.
THIS! It's really surprising how loud deer are in the woods. However, their cadence is different from humans. Humans tend to march. Walk in and sort of stutter your steps. Stop and go. You can cover more ground that you think. Good luck!
 

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If youre spooking all the deer when coming or going then I'd take a hard look at where my stands were located or how I was getting to the stand (which location youre taking to get to the stand). Always try to pick a direction that doesnt cross paths with the deer as youre heading in/out. There has been times I'd walk farther in a big looping circle to avoid walking thru/over the areas I know the deer travel thru as they head towards my stand. Other than that...if youre not scared of getting shot at...then I'd walk in at first light without burning flashlights. IMO the lights will spook (or alert) the deer of your presence more than you just slipping thru the woods at the crack of daylight. This is what I do anyways. Good luck to ya.:)
 

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What do you use for hunting boots? Some boots have those very hard vibram soles. Ok for work or hiking, not so much in the deer woods. Rubber boots tend to be a bit softer under foot. A lot of people walk heel to toe. Try stepping with your toes first. You can get a better feel for what your stepping on.
Another trick is to carry a Turkey call. Turkeys make a lot of noise in the woods. If you step on something, stop a second and do a few clucks on the call, it helps to relax any deer that may have heard you.
 

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Take yer time, a few steps then stop and listen, few steps, stop and listen, almost like still hunting in the dark. Your land and secluded, you should be able to slip through in the dark without a flashlight. I have never been a fan of using a flashlight to travel. Many warn me of danger, but as long as I know my trail and never use a light, I have pretty good night vision, but if I use a light, for anything, my eyes will take forever to readjust to no light.

The other thing is move early. In the forest or hardwoods, it's always noisy, and early season on oak flats they have been some of the best deer magnets I've encountered. Mainly white oak's, I always try and get settled in my stand, ground or tree, at least an hour before legal light. This means giving myself plenty of time to move I said earlier to get their.

I am a big guy and heat up easy, so I've learned to move slow, and take frequent stops to assure I don't break a sweat, I even carry most over clothing in and put it on as I chill down after getting to my stand. Doing this I have at times had deer blow, and been busted, but usually I have plenty of action after it starts getting light and after the sun finally starts to break the horizon, many times I am sure deer come back around to see what they were spooked by earlier as well. like was said, learn to slip, and never get in a hurry, you'll do just fine with a little practice, we all learned the same way!

Lastly as was said, don't be afraid to take a little longer going out of your way to avoid known travel routes, if you have creek beds or drainage's that hold moisture,, try to use them! Good luck, and enjoy your new adventure!!
 

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Take either a rake or a leaf blower and clear yourself a path. Of course do this in advance of hunting. I once took a rake a clear a small waking path about 4-500 hundred yards through the woods to get to stand. Took a little sweat, well a whole lot of sweat but I could get in there without making noise. Good luck
 

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I’ve always just tried to get in as quiet and quickly as possible in the dark, and slower and quiet in the afternoon. Noise is going to happen. If I’m hunting a travel spot, noise isn’t really a deal breaker since they’re generally moving through. and deer don’t generally care about noise if they don’t see or smell what’s making it. I’ve had deer show up 5-10 minutes after I got settled.
some pluses with raking or blowing a path is you can see it in the dark without lights, and deer will use it too.
 

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What do you use for hunting boots? Some boots have those very hard vibram soles. Ok for work or hiking, not so much in the deer woods. Rubber boots tend to be a bit softer under foot. A lot of people walk heel to toe. Try stepping with your toes first. You can get a better feel for what your stepping on.
Another trick is to carry a Turkey call. Turkeys make a lot of noise in the woods. If you step on something, stop a second and do a few clucks on the call, it helps to relax any deer that may have heard you.
Toes first!? Like a Balerina! Yikes! LOL Sorry, couldn't refuse....
 

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You've got a lot of good tips here. Just remember to have fun. You will make mistakes, we all do. The more time you spend in the woods the better you will get. Hunt other game as well. Squirrels are great for beginning hunters. They're easier to hunt because they're very forgiving. Spook them they will come back soon after things calm down. They will teach you a lot of woodsmanship skills. Plus they can be really tasty when cooked right.

Just remember when it comes to deer. We can fool their eyes and ears, but once they smell you it's game over. Even with the best scent control stuff out there they will still smell you. Nothing is 100% scent free. This is probably the most common mistake by beginner hunters. They get so focused on sight and sound they forget scent.
 
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