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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Any comment on using aluminum.
I always shot Easton aluminum in my compound bow.
Still new to crossbow . Centerpoint 370 Sniper (still in process of some upgrades)
Not really liking the carbon bolts, any comment on using aluminum.
It was a 2 min fix to replace a broken nock.
From what I'm reading changing
a broken nock on carbon can be a pain.
Thanks
 

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I shoot aluminum off my bows. Easton XX 75's, 2219. Sure are a lot cheaper than carbon. I can get a half dozen for about $ 30.00.
To me, they're just as good as carbon arrows and easier to work on.
 

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BEE nocks are just stuck in, not glued. Easily removed and replaced. Inserts....another story. I haven't shot alums since my vert days. If not mistaken theyre heavier than carbons....which means slower.
 

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Any comment on using aluminum.
I always shot Easton aluminum in my compound bow.
Still new to crossbow . Centerpoint 370 Sniper (still in process of some upgrades)
Not really liking the carbon bolts, any comment on using aluminum.
It was a 2 min fix to replace a broken nock.
From what I'm reading changing
a broken nock on carbon can be a pain.
Thanks
That depends on what arrows you are using. Some are glued in and can be very hard to get out. Others are press fit and change out easily. I use Black Eagle arrows and all my nocks are press fit.
 

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I have been shooting 20" both Carbon and Aluminum arrows with my modified Barnett Ghost 410. I will no longer shoot aluminum arrows equipped with broad heads into my Rinehart Rhino Block XL target as it bends the aluminum arrow shaft. I shoot 2219 XX75 and XX78 Super Slam. No problem with field points. Living in town and winter, I am shooting in my shop.

For carbon, I shoot the Barnett Custom Head Hunter (no Easton label) and the Carbon Express Pile Driver.

The 20" 2219 Aluminum arrows equipped with the same 100 grain point are quite a bit heavier than the carbon arrows of the same length. The Pile Driver are heavier than the Barnett Custom Head Hunter (no Easton label).
The reason I mention (no Easton label) is when Easton built arrows for Barnett, one did not know from one batch to the next what insert weight one was receiving. Identical new crossbows with the same arrow length, the arrows weighed different from one box to the other due to different inserts.

A removable nock (push in) is easy to change, but thoroughly inspect the carbon arrow shaft in that area for hair line cracks.

All the best.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I shoot aluminum off my bows. Easton XX 75's, 2219. Sure are a lot cheaper than carbon. I can get a half dozen for about $ 30.00.
To me, they're just as good as carbon arrows and easier to work on.
Thanks the xx75's were the ones i was looking at thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks everybody for the info.
 

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As far as removing the nock on a carbon arrow I have found that a steel rod about 4ft long and 1/8 inch in diameter will fit thru the hole in the the arrow insert and repeated blows from the edge of a small hammer usually will dislodge the nock, sometimes quite easily.
I have also positioned the rod on a hard, flat surface and slid the arrow shaft, sometimes quite forceably, up and down on the rod to dislodge the nock.
If the rod goes thru the nock before it has dislodged I remove the rod and thread an appropriately sized self tapping screw into the hole in the nock and repeat one or both of the procedures described above.
Only as a last resort do I try to drill a plastic nock out because I usually end up distorting or melting the shaft rendering the arrow shaft useless unless one has a quality cutoff saw and arrow squaring device, neither of which I own or want to.
 

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I have both. The plus side of aluminum is, they are very easy to cut with just a tubing cutter, less expensive, easy to process from bare shafts for yourself, compared to carbon. They are consistent arrows. You still need quality nocks. On the minus side, I've found the XX75, 2219 Magnums are a little more prone to bend than I thought they'd be. I did shoot 3D with mine. They tended to get nock end bends, not a lot, but easily seen on a spinner. The XX75 camo shafts I have held up much better and still spin straight. Don't know what the difference is. Also, with my RDX bow, using moon nocks, the aluminum grooves quickly down through the anodizing. With carbon, the grooving is still an issue, but the carbon seems much more resistant. As others have said, most nocks for carbon arrows are press in, and they can be removed and replaced easily. Inserts are a different matter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
As far as removing the nock on a carbon arrow I have found that a steel rod about 4ft long and 1/8 inch in diameter will fit thru the hole in the the arrow insert and repeated blows from the edge of a small hammer usually will dislodge the nock, sometimes quite easily.
I have also positioned the rod on a hard, flat surface and slid the arrow shaft, sometimes quite forceably, up and down on the rod to dislodge the nock.
If the rod goes thru the nock before it has dislodged I remove the rod and thread an appropriately sized self tapping screw into the hole in the nock and repeat one or both of the procedures described above.
Only as a last resort do I try to drill a plastic nock out because I usually end up distorting or melting the shaft rendering the arrow shaft useless unless one has a quality cutoff saw and arrow squaring device, neither of which I own or want to.
Thanks Trailcamguy for the info
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I have both. The plus side of aluminum is, they are very easy to cut with just a tubing cutter, less expensive, easy to process from bare shafts for yourself, compared to carbon. They are consistent arrows. You still need quality nocks. On the minus side, I've found the XX75, 2219 Magnums are a little more prone to bend than I thought they'd be. I did shoot 3D with mine. They tended to get nock end bends, not a lot, but easily seen on a spinner. The XX75 camo shafts I have held up much better and still spin straight. Don't know what the difference is. Also, with my RDX bow, using moon nocks, the aluminum grooves quickly down through the anodizing. With carbon, the grooving is still an issue, but the carbon seems much more resistant. As others have said, most nocks for carbon arrows are press in, and they can be removed and replaced easily. Inserts are a different matter.
Thanks Joe Pa, thats is my exact thinking I made my own arrows for vertical without any problems.
 

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They both will kill a deer, aluminum durability is the issue. They just do not hold up and stay tru. Shot xx75 for long time and threw away a crap load of bent arrows. Bloodsport hunters are $29.00 6. Broke one in the last year, over 800 shots. Zero bent. Last deer I shot complete pass thru in Rocky terrain,BH destroyed . brought arrow home and cleaned it up. Took it out back shot perfect at 30 yards. That is never going to happen with aluminum.
 
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