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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've just recently switched to hunting with a crossbow after 55 years of hunting with a vertical bow. I've taken 6 with my vertical bows but along the way I've had a few jump-the-string resulting in misses. In another month I will be hunting antelope with my Seige 410 and it is very loud compared to my vertical but also much faster. Have any of you antelope crossbow hunters had an antelope jump-the-string resulting in a miss or a bad hit?

I have a Mission Sub1 Lite and I've been thinking of hunting with it as it is quieter than my Seige but slower. Decisions, decisions! I hope I make the right one.
 

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I've been thinking about this lately and created a quick spreadsheet to see how much faster the noise of your bow reaches the animal at different speeds. Here are the numbers assuming bows with the speed of 300 FPS, 350 FPS, 400 FPS and 450 FPS. The numbers high-lighted in yellow are how much faster the sound of the shot reaches the animal (in seconds) before the arrow hits:

Screen Shot 2021-07-21 at 2.57.50 PM.png


It's hard to judge reaction time of a deer but I've seen estimates as low as .05 seconds. I haven't seen any estimates of antelope reaction times but I'd guess they're in the same class as whitetail deer. Considering humans can react in .15 seconds I think that deer having .05 in reaction time is somewhere in the ballpark.

I saw a video where a guy was shooting at 30 frames per second and from the time the shot was released the doe dropped around 3 or 4 inches in just 8 frames. The shot in this video was under 30 yards from a 300 FPS bow. In 30 yards the sound of that 300 FPS bow would reach the animal .22 seconds quicker than the arrow hits. If you take that same shot with a 400 FPS crossbow the animal would only have .145 seconds to react.

I think in all bow or crossbow hunting scenarios you will have to take deer reaction time into account while aiming, especially if you're going to reach out more than 40 or 50 yards.
 

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Used to live up on the high country of Colorado a decade ago. Saw lots of antelope, unlike deer they have excellent eyesight, besides the hearing and sense of smell. Just one more factor to overcome hunting them. Need to get close enough using natural arroyos and stalking. Not much cover in antelope country. If you’ve killed them with a vert bow I see no problem with a faster xbow but I could be totally wrong. Good luck on your hunt and post up after you’re done. Love to hear the outcome
 

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The ducking the string topic can be debated forever with no concrete claims either way. I would say that Antelope could be somewhat more susceptible to noise reaction then whitetail deer. Just guessing on that. To me the biggest factors would be the distance to the animal, obviously the further the more susceptible. Secondly, and likely more important would be the state of alertness the animal is in. If the animal is extremely nervous and on high alert, it will likely jump the string most of the time, even at 15 to 20 yards. If the animal is completely calm, less chance of jumping the string. You just have to judge and decide with every shot opportunity. Good luck hunting!
 

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It looked like the antelope were always on high alert to me but maybe they are just always skittish and on the lookout and ready to bolt. When I lived in Colorado I hunted with a 7mm mag and for elk and mule deer. Not much is going to out jump that
 

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Obviously. I take it you have seen an Antelope?
Only a black buck moves faster and no arrow on earth will beat that reaction.
Look at some water hole footage. You will see plenty of examples where 350fps wasnt even close to enough.
Sometimes you win and sometimes you lose with a bow and those goats.
Best to get as close as you can, shoot as fast as you can and aim as low as you can. Then cross your fingers and pray.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
All great posts. Bernie 72; that is an impressive chart. Distance and alertness are key factors to consider for sure. Once I took a shot with my vertical bow at a "goat" that was 50 yards away. He was standing looking at me when I took the shot. I swear the arrow was only 1/2 way to him when he was gone. What a humbling experience. That was back in my younger sometimes foolish days. But I'll never forget that shot.
 

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That’s why I love to hunt, trying to outsmart our prey. Getting close enough, playing the wind doing scouting and it’s still 50/50. I still learn something new on every hunt I go on. It’s still better than going to work, maybe I should sign up for that tv show Alone
 

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I have never shot a Pronghorn, but i have shot hundreds of white tails through the years. All types of sporting weapons used. Spect their fantastic eye sight is their Ace in the Hole. It would be hard to say if certain sounds will make them react. Mostly its seeing the Hunter n his/her movement. I have shot my tick toter slowly walking mostly away from me. I have shot them walking towards me n sometimes when they stop to eat acorns. Their own movement sounds muffle n some what cover my shot sound.
 

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I have never shot a Pronghorn, but i have shot hundreds of white tails through the years. All types of sporting weapons used. Spect their fantastic eye sight is their Ace in the Hole. It would be hard to say if certain sounds will make them react. Mostly its seeing the Hunter n his/her movement. I have shot my tick toter slowly walking mostly away from me. I have shot them walking towards me n sometimes when they stop to eat acorns. Their own movement sounds muffle n some what cover my shot sound.
Well a whitetail is akin to a blind bat hanging on a cave ceiling in comparison to a speed goat.
 

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Hunted Antelope for years with rifle and handgun but no bow expertise. One observation is that they are less spooky in the early morning and late afternoon. Always seemed to get closer at those times. During the day the bucks are tending their harems and just like a kid after eating all his halloween candy. Towards evening they bunch up and become more relaxed.
 

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Well a whitetail is akin to a blind bat hanging on a cave ceiling in comparison to a speed goat.
Couldn’t agree more, some of the best eyesight of any animal in North America. They live in the open plains and eyesight is more prominent that hearing
 

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Fastest animal in North America, open plains so probably gonna be a 40 to 60 yard shot. What could go wrong.....
 

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Tom on the run shot one at 52 yards couple years ago. Said that was as close as one got the entire hunt. Pretty skittish critters. Not a real big target.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Tom on the run shot one at 52 yards couple years ago. Said that was as close as one got the entire hunt. Pretty skittish critters. Not a real big target.
Reminds me of the longest big game shot I ever made with a vertical bow. 52 yards on a standing antelope. I was in a tower blind overlooking a alfalfa field. In four days of hunting this was the closest shot I had. The area was flat as a pancake with no chance of spot and stalk. After seeing lots of goats each day well out of range; 52 yards seem close so I took it. Glad I did. The goat ran about 100 yards before piling up.
 
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