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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone here have one, and whats your opinion. I have the DD puller, works but still a PIA. Heck the DD is now over 50 bucks. The $130 it cost is worth me not getting a pulled muscle. And yes I use a lube before every shot
 

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I use the Arojac and it works good. A little bit of a pain to use speed wise. I use a thin strip of plywood that sits on the ground and lays next to the arrow on the blob. That helps keeps the end of the Arojac from pushing into the blob target and gives you a longer stroke when pulling the arrow. That being said I have often wondered if the DD would work better and quicker.
 

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I have the Arrow Jac Puller and here is my review:
1)very expensive if importing into Canada due to currency conversion.

2)it will work but the target face has to be very firm or add something larger under the plunger part that contacts the target. A softer face target, the plunger base pushes into the target.

3)it only grips two sides of the arrow. One wants a complete circular support. A carbon arrow that is really stuck in a foam style target, one can not exert enough pressure on the jack to properly grip the arrow. This results in a cracked or crushed arrow. I have used a smaller C clamp to increase pressure and also give added pulling area. Carbon arrow shafts generate heat that causes foam in a target to bond to the arrow shaft. Lubing the front 3 to 4 inch of the arrow shaft helps.

To properly pull an arrow, the puller has to pull parallel with the arrow shaft (example: like an arrow gripper). The other pullers pull off to the side and not straight out as one pulls.

If you have access to acetylene cutting out fit, one can build a high quality arrow puller an for very little money.
Material: a pair of needle nose vise grips, 2 each slip on file handles with the slotted holes where a file would fit. A small piece of two inch long pipe and a small rubber hose that fits in the pipe with the inside diameter that fits the arrow.

Cut the pipe approximately 2" long, then split it in half. Put the pipe in the jaws of the vise grip so one half lines up evenly in each jaw section and the length of the pipe is centered in the jaws, 1/2 protruding out each side of the jaws. Braze weld the pipe pieces to the vise grip along the edge of the jaws only. Once cool, cut the rubber hose the same length as the pipe and split it length wise. I used Gorilla glue to glue to hose into the pipe. Put a piece of arrow shaft inside the hose and with light pressure close the vise grips. Leave until the glue is set.

Now you have a high quality puller that can be adjusted to various size arrows. Using both hands, one on the vise grip handles and the other on the file handle end of the vise grips, gives a very even, straight pull.

All the best.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I have the Arrow Jac Puller and here is my review:
1)very expensive if importing into Canada due to currency conversion.

2)it will work but the target face has to be very firm or add something larger under the plunger part that contacts the target. A softer face target, the plunger base pushes into the target.

3)it only grips two sides of the arrow. One wants a complete circular support. A carbon arrow that is really stuck in a foam style target, one can not exert enough pressure on the jack to properly grip the arrow. This results in a cracked or crushed arrow. I have used a smaller C clamp to increase pressure and also give added pulling area. Carbon arrow shafts generate heat that causes foam in a target to bond to the arrow shaft. Lubing the front 3 to 4 inch of the arrow shaft helps.

To properly pull an arrow, the puller has to pull parallel with the arrow shaft (example: like an arrow gripper). The other pullers pull off to the side and not straight out as one pulls.

If you have access to acetylene cutting out fit, one can build a high quality arrow puller an for very little money.
Material: a pair of needle nose vise grips, 2 each slip on file handles with the slotted holes where a file would fit. A small piece of two inch long pipe and a small rubber hose that fits in the pipe with the inside diameter that fits the arrow.

Cut the pipe approximately 2" long, then split it in half. Put the pipe in the jaws of the vise grip so one half lines up evenly in each jaw section and the length of the pipe is centered in the jaws, 1/2 protruding out each side of the jaws. Braze weld the pipe pieces to the vise grip along the edge of the jaws only. Once cool, cut the rubber hose the same length as the pipe and split it length wise. I used Gorilla glue to glue to hose into the pipe. Put a piece of arrow shaft inside the hose and with light pressure close the vise grips. Leave until the glue is set.

Now you have a high quality puller that can be adjusted to various size arrows. Using both hands, one on the vise grip handles and the other on the file handle end of the vise grips, gives a very even, straight pull.

All the best.
Do you have a picture, i can cut and weld
 

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Diagonal pliers Pliers Wire stripper Lineman's pliers Slip joint pliers
I made this one, machined a a bushing cut in half and welded it to the pliers I used half inch fuel line epoxied to the bushing to protect the carbon arrow it will pull both crossbow and vertical arrows.
 

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I have a DD but, it's worthless to me. It offers NO mechanical advantage what-so-ever. Still all you. The AroJac breaks the bond quickly and, after you shoot a bunch of arrows with it I have become very fast at removing dozens of arrows at a time. I don't see the AroJac plunger sinking very deep in my targets. Rineharts yes.
 

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The target showing is the Rinehart Rhino Block XL with the hoist hooked up to pull an arrow. Toughest recorded pull was 165 pound. This scale has to be manually locked in as it does not have peak weight. The 165 pound arrow pull actually required a harder pull.
Here are some pictures of the tool I built:
Puller hooked to the hoist.
Arrow in the target with tool installed.
Tool in the open position.
Tool with the file handles off. One can purchase round handles. I happened to have these. I would not use wood handles due to pulling side wise. Normally file handles are designed to move back and forth and not side wise like they are used for this tool.
Tool with the handles off, showing the slot in the handle where a file normally fits.
Tool in the closed position.
Tool holding the arrow.
Tool holding the arrow: close up.
Yellow Snack
Air gun
Tool Pliers Metalworking hand tool
Circuit component
Wire stripper Revolver Bolt cutter Pliers Tool
Rotorcraft Helicopter
Tool accessory Tool Machine Hardware accessory

As long as 1 1/2" arrow shaft at the nock end is showing, the tool can be used and ones fingers will still fit between the tool and the target. One adjusts this vise grip tool as one normally would if used as vise grips. If the tool were to slip a bit, just add a bit more pressure. This tool provides full 360 degree support to the arrow shaft resulting in a straight pull when using both hands.
With tool in the closed position, the hose is a shade larger than the split pipe that is brazed to the vise grip. This way the hose can crush a wee bit before the metal pipe halves come in contact with each other.

All the best.
 

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Here is a couple of pictures:
1)pulling the arrow from the target in Post #10 using the hoist.
2)the arrow after it was pulled showing the crude (burnt) build up. Regardless whether a carbon arrow is lubed or not, this is what an arrow looks like when it is removed from this target. This makes for a harder pull.
Measuring instrument Tool Meter Watch
Pen Office supplies Writing implement

The arrow is a 20" Carbon Express Pile Driver 450 grain arrow-point combination that penetrated approximately 10". Due to living in town and winter, I'm shooting in my shop at 17 1/2 feet from the stirrup to the front of the target at an average of 421 to 423 feet per second with the modified Barnett Ghost 410 crossbow with a 185 pound draw weight..

Shooting longer distances and a lower draw weight crossbow, there would be less penetration.
Even though it is hard to remove arrows, I highly recommend this target for broad heads.

All the best.
 

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Wow, thanks
Nice job Bbunnyrabbit. There are only a couple of things here to consider. Most of us here don't have the equipment to make one like yours. It does look a little cumbersome to pull arrows in tight groups.
Here is one that will pull in line with the arrow. It must be pretty good because there are over 20 Chinese copies of its shape on Amazon.
Ours is the original and the biggest difference is we use tire rubber which has the best grip. At 165lbs of pull to get the arrow out, if the shooter can pull 165lbs it will grip without damage to the arrow.

http://www.thirdhandarchery.com/product.asp?PRODID=7

 

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To properly pull an arrow, the puller has to pull parallel with the arrow shaft (example: like an arrow gripper). The other pullers pull off to the side and not straight out as one pulls.

If you have access to acetylene cutting out fit, one can build a high quality arrow puller an for very little money.
Material: a pair of needle nose vise grips, 2 each slip on file handles with the slotted holes where a file would fit. A small piece of two inch long pipe and a small rubber hose that fits in the pipe with the inside diameter that fits the arrow.

Cut the pipe approximately 2" long, then split it in half. Put the pipe in the jaws of the vise grip so one half lines up evenly in each jaw section and the length of the pipe is centered in the jaws, 1/2 protruding out each side of the jaws. Braze weld the pipe pieces to the vise grip along the edge of the jaws only. Once cool, cut the rubber hose the same length as the pipe and split it length wise. I used Gorilla glue to glue to hose into the pipe. Put a piece of arrow shaft inside the hose and with light pressure close the vise grips. Leave until the glue is set.

Now you have a high quality puller that can be adjusted to various size arrows. Using both hands, one on the vise grip handles and the other on the file handle end of the vise grips, gives a very even, straight pull.

All the best.
Hey Mr. B-rabbit, have you considered posting this in the DIY Section ? It's a great idea!
 

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Nice job Bbunnyrabbit. There are only a couple of things here to consider. Most of us here don't have the equipment to make one like yours. It does look a little cumbersome to pull arrows in tight groups.
Here is one that will pull in line with the arrow. It must be pretty good because there are over 20 Chinese copies of its shape on Amazon.
Ours is the original and the biggest difference is we use tire rubber which has the best grip. At 165lbs of pull to get the arrow out, if the shooter can pull 165lbs it will grip without damage to the arrow.

http://www.thirdhandarchery.com/product.asp?PRODID=7

Thanks for the suggestion. I have the equivalent design to the puller that is shown in the video. It works very well. The problem is, what ever the manufacture used in this target not only does it bond to the carbon arrow shaft, but it builds up black, burnt looking stuff on the out side which further causes resistance when trying to remove carbon arrows: Post #12 second picture.

Shooting aluminum arrows with field points my arrow gripper easily removes them as aluminum dissipates heat.

Note: as a warning do not shoot 2219 aluminum arrows with broad heads into this target as it bends the arrow shaft. I used XX78 Super slam which is a tougher aluminum arrow.

I have tested many foam targets using the same crossbow, same distance and speed in feet per second. Any foam target that a carbon arrow was hard to remove, a slight tap on the nock end with a mallet breaks the bond for easy arrow removal. Not so with this target.

Various responses mention shooting broad heads into the 4 field point sides to loosen up the target before shooting field points. This is agreeable, but first you have to get the originals out. Lubing the arrow shaft before shooting into this target had no effect due to this external build up.

For stopping broad head equipped arrows and portability of the target, this is my number one choice.

As for the blob target that several recommend, to bring that target into Canada, it would be cheaper to drive down for it as to pay for front end loaders to load and unload the target at different stops to bring it into Canada.

All the best.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thanks for the suggestion. I have the equivalent design to the puller that is shown in the video. It works very well. The problem is, what ever the manufacture used in this target not only does it bond to the carbon arrow shaft, but it builds up black, burnt looking stuff on the out side which further causes resistance when trying to remove carbon arrows: Post #12 second picture.

Shooting aluminum arrows with field points my arrow gripper easily removes them as aluminum dissipates heat.

Note: as a warning do not shoot 2219 aluminum arrows with broad heads into this target as it bends the arrow shaft. I used XX78 Super slam which is a tougher aluminum arrow.

I have tested many foam targets using the same crossbow, same distance and speed in feet per second. Any foam target that a carbon arrow was hard to remove, a slight tap on the nock end with a mallet breaks the bond for easy arrow removal. Not so with this target.

Various responses mention shooting broad heads into the 4 field point sides to loosen up the target before shooting field points. This is agreeable, but first you have to get the originals out. Lubing the arrow shaft before shooting into this target had no effect due to this external build up.

For stopping broad head equipped arrows and portability of the target, this is my number one choice.

As for the blob target that several recommend, to bring that target into Canada, it would be cheaper to drive down for it as to pay for front end loaders to load and unload the target at different stops to bring it into Canada.

All the best.
Got everything cut up and ready for welding, just got to get the two file handles
 
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"bowmanmt" if you put the 1/2 pipes around a bolt and tighten with a nut, then center that in the vise grips, everything will hold in position better for welding. Sorry I did not mention that sooner.

All the best.
 
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