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Luckily for Barnett a lot of their customers are savvy enough to fix their inferior work. Me I'm not . So when I have time to get mine to the shop to have them change out my cables and string (60x) I'm sure they will rake Barnett over the coals. They are a Ten Point dealer
I am sure they have had a lot of complaints on the flagship bows as well.
I know my wife's bow (10 point) was such a piece of crap that it couldn't even be sold or repaired by 10 point. She took the refund and moved on.
Just saying.
 

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All I will say, I have totally enjoyed my Raptor Pro STR experience to date. It's shoots as accurately as any crossbow off a shooting stick, it's compact, and it's strong as a tank. Is it a perfect Xbow no but what you get at it's price point is one heckuva a deal. I'd buy another!
 

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Yesterday I purchased a Barnett Whitetail Hunter PRO STR. This crossbow has the 187 pound draw weight limbs, trigger tech, brush arrow retainer and string stops. It is advertised to shoot a 380 grain arrow-point combination at 400 feet per second. It is supposedly compatible with the Barnett Crank Cocking Device.

This crossbow trigger tech system has zero trigger creep, the same as my other Barnett crossbows have with the old style trigger. No gain here.

One cam was out of time a wee bit, plus the cams needed leveling in the cocked position. No problem, being I have my own bow press. Tuning the crossbow, I got it to shoot a 410 grain arrow-point combination at 387, 388, 389 and 387.

Problems that I encountered and some can not be corrected:

1)installing the riser to the rail-stock. The string dampener system is part of the riser with no adjustments. It is a molded assembly with pipe tubing for the grooved rubbers. The groove in the rubbers sit high and do not center with the bowstring.
I am not able to use my Ten Point String Dampening System as the cables are too close to the riser in the uncocked position. The rail-stock is predrilled for Barnett's other string dampener system.

2)the scope rings are not the cap design, but are vertical. Making any scope adjustments when loosening the rings, throws the scope out of adjustment. These could be replaced with the cap style rings.

3)using my Bushnell AR223 3 x 12 x 40 Drop Zone scope with the side parallax, I ran out of adjustment trying to lower my shots shooting 17 1/2 feet in my shop. The crossbow is mounted in a high quality rifle jig with level bubbles on it. When I installed the crossbow in the jig, I put a level across the riser. The level was previously checked, swapping it end to end to see if I received the same reading which I had. A properly built level gives the same reading.

I removed the scope and put the level on the rail-stock. It was level. Next I put the level on the scope picatinny rail. Using the 9 inch level, the front of the picatinny rail was 3/8" lower than the back. Due to this, when I looked through the scope, my crossbow was tilted too high. Shimming a scope in this case will not work. This is where Ravin failed with their R9. They went for distance, tilting the picatinny rail down. Closer shooting, the scope could not be properly adjusted. No Ravin Jack at that time. The HHA was available then.

4)the stock is compatible with the Barnett Crank Cocking Device, but a few modifications are required. The string anchors have to follow next to the rail-stock, otherwise when reaching the fully cocked position they are forced outwards. The sled comes in two styles. One has vertical pulleys which you do not want. The other has horizontal pulleys. To made the correction for the string, I punched out the pulley axle and rerouted the anchor string the opposite way. The crimp is too large to just push the string through. The other way is to remove the string from the crank pulley, put when reinstalling the knot these string lengths have to match or your sled will not pull even.

Fitting the pulley ratchet assembly: due to a thinner stock, the two smaller allen head bolts would have to be cut shorter. The cover plug for the safety lever is too tight and would have to be filed down a bit. This crossbow stock is not designed to have the snap in finish crank covers that the Barnett Ghost 410 or Barnett Buck Commander BCXtreme 365 Ultra Lite has.

Due to the major manufacturing errors: string stops and picatinny rail, the crossbow will be returned to the place of purchase.

All the best.
Hmmm. I purchased a Raptor Pro STR. Which is exactly the same Xbow as the Whitetail Pro STR except for camo type. I am DEFINITELY a novice when it comes to working on any Xbow. But by using the shim method I discovered right here (I think it was on a bunnyrabbit post) I was able to get the string riding the rails with no down pressure on string. For me, this also had the benefit of centering the string to the stops. And the string kept popping out from behind the front spindle on the cranking devise. The one where the crank's string is also anchored. This was a simple fix. Just add oversized rubber washers to the spindles this closes the gap between spindle and stock frame that was allowing the string to "escape". I also used rail snot on the whole string system. I figured it would minimize the heat generated as the string rode against the rubber washer. It SEEMS to have made the whole thing easier to cock. Result? I LOVE my Raptor and am absolutely stuuned at how fast it shoots. I'm starting at twenty yard shots to get used to the feel of it but once I got it zeroed I HAD to shoot at different bulls -eyes on the target or I would have quickly run out of arrows!! Shooting three rounds at a time the first one is dead center and the next two are jammed against the first. A nickel would have covered all three. How I managed to still have all fletchings, undamaged I'll never know!
 

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Hmmm. I purchased a Raptor Pro STR. Which is exactly the same Xbow as the Whitetail Pro STR except for camo type. I am DEFINITELY a novice when it comes to working on any Xbow. But by using the shim method I discovered right here (I think it was on a bunnyrabbit post) I was able to get the string riding the rails with no down pressure on string. For me, this also had the benefit of centering the string to the stops. And the string kept popping out from behind the front spindle on the cranking devise. The one where the crank's string is also anchored. This was a simple fix. Just add oversized rubber washers to the spindles this closes the gap between spindle and stock frame that was allowing the string to "escape". I also used rail snot on the whole string system. I figured it would minimize the heat generated as the string rode against the rubber washer. It SEEMS to have made the whole thing easier to cock. Result? I LOVE my Raptor and am absolutely stuuned at how fast it shoots. I'm starting at twenty yard shots to get used to the feel of it but once I got it zeroed I HAD to shoot at different bulls -eyes on the target or I would have quickly run out of arrows!! Shooting three rounds at a time the first one is dead center and the next two are jammed against the first. A nickel would have covered all three. How I managed to still have all fletchings, undamaged I'll never know!
Bowjax jumbo stops really help with the string centering. Much larger sweet spot and they reall absorb vibration.
 

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Yep. They definitely look "beefier" than what ca.e on the Xbow. But how do you remove stops that are already there? They appear to be glued to riser. And how do new ones attach? They appear to be held in place by screws. Is drilling holes in riser necessary? I get nervous just THINKING about attempting something like that!!
 

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Yep. They definitely look "beefier" than what ca.e on the Xbow. But how do you remove stops that are already there? They appear to be glued to riser. And how do new ones attach? They appear to be held in place by screws. Is drilling holes in riser necessary? I get nervous just THINKING about attempting something like that!!
Also, are those cable slides on the cable or are they just for noise dampening?
 

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Discussion Starter #30
In regards to the original rubbers, you just remove them.
The cables slide back and for through the slide as the crossbow is cocked and shot.
The slide moves toward the shooter when cocking the crossbow and forward when shooting the crossbow.
This area has to be well lubricated. The purposed of the slide is to prevent wear on the cables. Older
model crossbows (using my Barnett Ghost 410 as an example) had a Teflon strip. The problem here,
where the Teflon strip fit in the upper "J" section was not flat and the Teflon did not have enough sticky.
It would wrinkle and pile up which would damage the cables.
Later they came out with a hard piece of what ever which worked better. The cable slide was a big improvement.

All the best.
Take care.
 

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Yesterday I purchased a Barnett Whitetail Hunter PRO STR. This crossbow has the 187 pound draw weight limbs, trigger tech, brush arrow retainer and string stops. It is advertised to shoot a 380 grain arrow-point combination at 400 feet per second. It is supposedly compatible with the Barnett Crank Cocking Device.

This crossbow trigger tech system has zero trigger creep, the same as my other Barnett crossbows have with the old style trigger. No gain here.

One cam was out of time a wee bit, plus the cams needed leveling in the cocked position. No problem, being I have my own bow press. Tuning the crossbow, I got it to shoot a 410 grain arrow-point combination at 387, 388, 389 and 387.

Problems that I encountered and some can not be corrected:

1)installing the riser to the rail-stock. The string dampener system is part of the riser with no adjustments. It is a molded assembly with pipe tubing for the grooved rubbers. The groove in the rubbers sit high and do not center with the bowstring.
I am not able to use my Ten Point String Dampening System as the cables are too close to the riser in the uncocked position. The rail-stock is predrilled for Barnett's other string dampener system.

2)the scope rings are not the cap design, but are vertical. Making any scope adjustments when loosening the rings, throws the scope out of adjustment. These could be replaced with the cap style rings.

3)using my Bushnell AR223 3 x 12 x 40 Drop Zone scope with the side parallax, I ran out of adjustment trying to lower my shots shooting 17 1/2 feet in my shop. The crossbow is mounted in a high quality rifle jig with level bubbles on it. When I installed the crossbow in the jig, I put a level across the riser. The level was previously checked, swapping it end to end to see if I received the same reading which I had. A properly built level gives the same reading.

I removed the scope and put the level on the rail-stock. It was level. Next I put the level on the scope picatinny rail. Using the 9 inch level, the front of the picatinny rail was 3/8" lower than the back. Due to this, when I looked through the scope, my crossbow was tilted too high. Shimming a scope in this case will not work. This is where Ravin failed with their R9. They went for distance, tilting the picatinny rail down. Closer shooting, the scope could not be properly adjusted. No Ravin Jack at that time. The HHA was available then.

4)the stock is compatible with the Barnett Crank Cocking Device, but a few modifications are required. The string anchors have to follow next to the rail-stock, otherwise when reaching the fully cocked position they are forced outwards. The sled comes in two styles. One has vertical pulleys which you do not want. The other has horizontal pulleys. To made the correction for the string, I punched out the pulley axle and rerouted the anchor string the opposite way. The crimp is too large to just push the string through. The other way is to remove the string from the crank pulley, put when reinstalling the knot these string lengths have to match or your sled will not pull even.

Fitting the pulley ratchet assembly: due to a thinner stock, the two smaller allen head bolts would have to be cut shorter. The cover plug for the safety lever is too tight and would have to be filed down a bit. This crossbow stock is not designed to have the snap in finish crank covers that the Barnett Ghost 410 or Barnett Buck Commander BCXtreme 365 Ultra Lite has.

Due to the major manufacturing errors: string stops and picatinny rail, the crossbow will be returned to the place of purchase.

All the best.
really good review. we have 2 which are in great shape but not because you got a lemon. moat are lemons.
 

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Yep. They definitely look "beefier" than what ca.e on the Xbow. But how do you remove stops that are already there? They appear to be glued to riser. And how do new ones attach? They appear to be held in place by screws. Is drilling holes in riser necessary? I get nervous just THINKING about attempting something like that!!
You are not replacing the posts,only the rubber on the end. They just twist/pull off. The jumbo will cover entire rod. Quieter,better vibration dampening.
 

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Hmmm. I purchased a Raptor Pro STR. Which is exactly the same Xbow as the Whitetail Pro STR except for camo type. I am DEFINITELY a novice when it comes to working on any Xbow. But by using the shim method I discovered right here (I think it was on a bunnyrabbit post) I was able to get the string riding the rails with no down pressure on string. For me, this also had the benefit of centering the string to the stops. And the string kept popping out from behind the front spindle on the cranking devise. The one where the crank's string is also anchored. This was a simple fix. Just add oversized rubber washers to the spindles this closes the gap between spindle and stock frame that was allowing the string to "escape". I also used rail snot on the whole string system. I figured it would minimize the heat generated as the string rode against the rubber washer. It SEEMS to have made the whole thing easier to cock. Result? I LOVE my Raptor and am absolutely stuuned at how fast it shoots. I'm starting at twenty yard shots to get used to the feel of it but once I got it zeroed I HAD to shoot at different bulls -eyes on the target or I would have quickly run out of arrows!! Shooting three rounds at a time the first one is dead center and the next two are jammed against the first. A nickel would have covered all three. How I managed to still have all fletchings, undamaged I'll never know!
I had the Raptor Pro STR and it was a fantastic Xbow. It's built like a tank and very accurate.
 

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You are not replacing the posts,only the rubber on the end. They just twist/pull off. The jumbo will cover entire rod. Quieter,better vibration dampening.
Ahhh. OK. Thanks. But what about the two pieces mounted to cable on each side, just before the cables cross each other, in the "J" section. One mounted on each side, right before cables cross. Noise dampeners or actual cable slides, that keep cables from touching where they DO cross?
 

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Is there a cable slide for this Xbow?
 
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