Crossbow Nation banner
21 - 40 of 69 Posts

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
13,733 Posts
I owned and operated surgical instrument repair service for thirty plus years in the medical industry. If you want a razor sharp knife buy a 1x30 inch belt sander. You can grind a nice beveled edge on a blade in less than 30 seconds. Put on a 1x30 leather belt, add white rouge with the belt moving then polish the bur off and in less than 20 seconds. Trust me you'll have a razor sharp knife. I can't tell you how many loading dock workers I sharpened knives for free. Pay it forward and those guys helped me out with electrical hook ups for my service van/contractors. Punt the old man's honing stone.
I have a Makita ... one inch belt sander for a million years with a 21" belt. What are the details of this 30"x1" system you're talking about? Where would you get a 1" leather endless loop stropping belt?
Font Electric blue Plastic Auto part Machine
 
  • Like
Reactions: LonewolfMcquade

·
Registered
ScorpyD ACLEUS 460
Joined
·
4,206 Posts
using leather strap does miracles to blades
There are certain types of knife blades that can’t be sharpened with anything other than a leather strap. Take for example a true Damascus Steel blade or a San Mai Japanese Edge. These steels are much to hard in their Rockwell Hardness factors. As such, they need to be honed with a leather strop in order to maintain their edge.

If you attempt to go at these knives with a stone or even a set of diamond stones the knifes edge will continue to fragment but never sharpen.

Half the battle in sharpening is knowing what type of instruments are necessary to achieve a factory sharp edge on any given knife.

If I asked most people what the single most important tool is for knife sharpening I’m willing to bet very few would get it correct. The fact of the matter is it is a thick tipped black Sharpie Marker. It’s used to put a fine 1/16” line covering the knife edge in both sides of the knifes blade. This line is used to determine the exact angle the blade needs to positioned to the sharpener to repeat the factory edge. If this is not done then you are attempting to cut a whole new edge angle each time you sharpen the blade.

As you slide the sharpener along the knifes edge or visa versa you should see only the last 1/16” of the black marker being removed from the knifes edge. If any more or less marker is being removed it indicates your angle is off and it needs to be adjusted until you have it correct. Once you find the correct angle it needs to be maintained and match on both sides of the blade.

if you can do these things and providing you have the correct sharpening tools you’ll find it relatively easy to keep a shaving edge on all your knives.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
13,733 Posts
There are certain types of knife blades that can’t be sharpened with anything other than a leather strap. Take for example a true Damascus Steel blade or a San Mai Japanese Edge. These steels are much to hard in their Rockwell Hardness factors. As such, they need to be honed with a leather strop in order to maintain their edge.

If you attempt to go at these knives with a stone or even a set of diamond stones the knifes edge will continue to fragment but never sharpen.

Half the battle in sharpening is knowing what type of instruments are necessary to achieve a factory sharp edge on any given knife.

If I asked most people what the single most important tool is for knife sharpening I’m willing to bet very few would get it correct. The fact of the matter is it is a thick tipped black Sharpie Marker. It’s used to put a fine 1/16” line covering the knife edge in both sides of the knifes blade. This line is used to determine the exact angle the blade needs to positioned to the sharpener to repeat the factory edge. If this is not done then you are attempting to cut a whole new edge angle each time you sharpen the blade.

As you slide the sharpener along the knifes edge or visa versa you should see only the last 1/16” of the black marker being removed from the knifes edge. If any more or less marker is being removed it indicates your angle is off and it needs to be adjusted until you have it correct. Once you find the correct angle it needs to be maintained and match on both sides of the blade.

if you can do these things and providing you have the correct sharpening tools you’ll find it relatively easy to keep a shaving edge on all your knives.
Amen ... those super premium Japanese blades are way out of my need/use zone. Every knife on earth will become dull, it's just a matter of when. The premium knife brands have had hundreds of years perfecting knives for professionals and consumers that will FIT those people's skill set. That skill set includes keeping those knives world class sharp without exorbitant painstaking efforts and tools. A "too hard" blade is "too hard" to sharpen...lol As for stropping, it's my experience you can keep a knife razor sharp for quite a while by stropping religiously. BUT, it can't go on forever. Eventually you have to shape the edge again.
 

·
Registered
MK-XB58 Kraken / Hawke 3-9x50 parallax, mildot
Joined
·
3,627 Posts
There are certain types of knife blades that can’t be sharpened with anything other than a leather strap. Take for example a true Damascus Steel blade or a San Mai Japanese Edge. These steels are much to hard in their Rockwell Hardness factors. As such, they need to be honed with a leather strop in order to maintain their edge.

If you attempt to go at these knives with a stone or even a set of diamond stones the knifes edge will continue to fragment but never sharpen.

Half the battle in sharpening is knowing what type of instruments are necessary to achieve a factory sharp edge on any given knife.

If I asked most people what the single most important tool is for knife sharpening I’m willing to bet very few would get it correct. The fact of the matter is it is a thick tipped black Sharpie Marker. It’s used to put a fine 1/16” line covering the knife edge in both sides of the knifes blade. This line is used to determine the exact angle the blade needs to positioned to the sharpener to repeat the factory edge. If this is not done then you are attempting to cut a whole new edge angle each time you sharpen the blade.

As you slide the sharpener along the knifes edge or visa versa you should see only the last 1/16” of the black marker being removed from the knifes edge. If any more or less marker is being removed it indicates your angle is off and it needs to be adjusted until you have it correct. Once you find the correct angle it needs to be maintained and match on both sides of the blade.

if you can do these things and providing you have the correct sharpening tools you’ll find it relatively easy to keep a shaving edge on all your knives.
yes, learned marker trick from ranchfairy, its very usefull

was also thinking what to do if i ever encounter hard blade
 

·
Registered
ScorpyD ACLEUS 460
Joined
·
4,206 Posts
yes, learned marker trick from ranchfairy, its very usefull

was also thinking what to do if i ever encounter hard blade
So we have to start with the knowledge there’s a difference between “sharpening” and polishing, correct? That said, most knives can and should be sharpened with the right tools at the manufactures blade angle. However, some of the extremely high end knife makers who use super hard steel like those I’ve mention along with companies like Puma who produce some of their top end knives made from Solinger Steel from Germany have Rockwell Hardnesses above 59 to 60. This super hard steel requires re-polishing which is time consuming even with a good barbers strop. The advantage to it is the fact that after polishing these blades can withstand a great deal of usage before getting dulled.

I don’t advocate one type of a knife or blade type over another since there are pro’s and con’s to each. As long as you know what your buying and are prepared to maintain or replace whatever you choose you are all set.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
13,733 Posts
At one ... time I was actually researching microscopes strictly to look at how my knife blade edges looked after sharpening!...lol
 

·
Registered
MK-XB58 Kraken / Hawke 3-9x50 parallax, mildot
Joined
·
3,627 Posts
i once tried to make edge to my mates supposedly real combat butterfly knife which was dulled, or never sharpened
i hardly made scratch on it with maybe 600 or 800 stone, now im stubborn to get something done when i start, but on this one i had to give up, my mate actually did made edge on it, i think it took him a week

this was roughly 35years ago, much has river flown since
 

·
Registered
MK-XB58 Kraken / Hawke 3-9x50 parallax, mildot
Joined
·
3,627 Posts
tbh, i dont keep my mora sharp anymore, just sharp enough
for few months i was truly anal with it, but after wearing out 2nd chamoise leather slice i kinda gave up on it
that axe does not require constant polishin, bet its lot harder than mora
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,254 Posts
At one ... time I was actually researching microscopes strictly to look at how my knife blade edges looked after sharpening!...lol
I had a friend that worked for a lab and had access to a high powered microscope. I remember polishing one of my pet blades to hair whittling sharpness and bringing it in to see what the final edges looked like. It was the most God-awful saw-toothed edge you ever saw. what looks like perfection to the human eye isn't the case under high magnification.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
13,733 Posts
I had a friend that worked for a lab and had access to a high powered microscope. I remember polishing one of my pet blades to hair whittling sharpness and bringing it in to see what the final edges looked like. It was the most God-awful saw-toothed edge you ever saw. what looks like perfection to the human eye isn't the case under high magnification.
LOL, yeah ... I was looking at cheap microscopes that wouldn't leave me so disenchanted. :sick: My theory was just enough definition for me to improve my sharpening technique. 😂 :)
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
3,573 Posts
One thing of note. It is far better to keep a blade sharp by touching up than to have to let the edge become dull and resharpen. For that, I use the little Gatco sharpeners.
Product Sports equipment Font Video game accessory Insect
 
  • Like
Reactions: Runningbuck

·
Registered
Joined
·
126 Posts
Edge Pro
Ive used stones, Gatco , Lansky, Kme sharpening sytems. Also belt sanders and paper wheels. All work. All have a learning curve. I think the Edge Pro is my favorite for knives. The lack of a clamping system is actually beneficial for long chef knives. When done correctly it doesent take a lot of effort to hold the blade on the table. But definitely a bit harder than a clamping system. To reduce hand fatigue they now have a magnet system that holds the blade to the table. Replacement stones are plentiful form a lot of manufacturers and are cheaper than stones for a wicked edge. Its a great knife sharpening system.
 

·
Member
Hub of the Great Lakes, Ontario
Joined
·
136 Posts
KME with the diamond stones…hands down the best.
I make hunting knives as a hobby…and use O1 tool steel for the blades. ( retired machinist)
sometimes I get the blades a little too hard and the KME sharpens the up perfect.
nothing better IMHO…Lloyd
Wood Tableware Knife Material property Cutlery
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
13,733 Posts
KME with the diamond stones…hands down the best.
I make hunting knives as a hobby…and use O1 tool steel for the blades. ( retired machinist)
sometimes I get the blades a little too hard and the KME sharpens the up perfect.
nothing better IMHO…Lloyd View attachment 229337
(y)Beautiful!!!(y)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,938 Posts
Now ya'll done done it.....got me interested in the Chef's Choice 1520 sharpener. Wonder if the wife could use it and how will it work on her cheap kitchen knives?!?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,222 Posts

Here’s Project Farms findings.
I love his YT channel. Maybe we can get him to do a crossbow comparison video.:ROFLMAO:
”We’re going to test that.”
 
  • Like
Reactions: Dirt fahmah
21 - 40 of 69 Posts
Top