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When I see ... "oil" all I think of is stones clogged up with grease and metal filings. When I was young I did the oil deal on your garden variety Norton double sided sharpening stones. I much prefer water and whetstones. I can feel the difference between a clean stone and a stone with metal buildup. I even use water on my DMT diamond stones. When I use the dry Spyderco system I always clean the stones afterward, sometimes even during use. I know oil has it's advocates and you can get a knife sharp with it, just not me ...lol My old Norton stones reside out in the garage and I use them for sharpening utility knife blades, old knives I use for cutting insulation, hatchets, axes, machetes and a finished edge on lawnmower blades. :)
Duke this got me thinking. We are truly different in our thinking. You like speed, I like momentum. You like disposable broadheads, I like indestructible broadheads. You like whetstones, I prefer oilstones. You like compound crossbows, I prefer the simplicity of a recurve. I'm all for high FOC of my arrows, you go with industry standard. I really like blonds, brunettes, redheads and you....? Maybe when it comes to women we have something in common.

JH HUNTER
 

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Duke this got me thinking. We are truly different in our thinking. You like speed, I like momentum. You like disposable broadheads, I like indestructible broadheads. You like whetstones, I prefer oilstones. You like compound crossbows, I prefer the simplicity of a recurve. I'm all for high FOC of my arrows, you go with industry standard. I really like blonds, brunettes, redheads and you....? Maybe when it comes to women we have something in common.

JH HUNTER
Unequivocally ... and indubitably we can find common ground on Sheilas. :love:
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The trick with oil stones is, to never leave them dirty. You clean the stone by putting a few drops of oil on it, then use your finger to rub the oil into the stone in a circular motion. All the metal gets lifted out of the pores and you take a cloth and wipe it off. repeat twice and they are clean and ready for storage. That is the only trick to it. My oilstones are just as good as the first day I bought them.

JH HUNTER
thats good way to get rid of finger prints too, you also get healthy red color and tiny sting for few days

been there done that, cant touch my stone with bare fingers, i carefully wipe it with a rag after water if theres any
its oil stone thats been filled with bottle of oil, took few days to soak it all in

edit: you guys actually made me sharpen my knife...

took cleaner wipe and brushed the stone under water to remove alumium left overs it still had some, came out clean. used marker pen to make sure i get right angle, didnt even try to make burr into it, just wiped enough and bit more to remove marker, then used tensioned slice of charmoise leather in blanked and started polishin, that revealed the burr, didnt take too much to remove it, only im still strugglin with the tip part, carefully used both sides on stone and its almost fine

sharp enough
 

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Duke this got me thinking. We are truly different in our thinking. You like speed, I like momentum. You like disposable broadheads, I like indestructible broadheads. You like whetstones, I prefer oilstones. You like compound crossbows, I prefer the simplicity of a recurve. I'm all for high FOC of my arrows, you go with industry standard. I really like blonds, brunettes, redheads and you....? Maybe when it comes to women we have something in common.

JH HUNTER
And by the way ... Your hunting area is quite different than mine. You have large animals and potentially dangerous animals afield. I don't have any doubt that I'd be subscribing to most of the same techniques and equipment as you if I was in South Africa. All except that ridiculous recurve affair you got going there. :p 😂 Moon had the same affliction. Took years but eventually he came around to my way of thinking and bought a state-of-the-art compound. :sneaky:;) I'd still be shooting a 180ke to 220ke compound but the arrows would be heavy and the broadhead stout. (y):)
 
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i recalled it, i used foot rasp with pretty rough paper in it to prepare the stone, took a while to get rough out from it but im really glad i did that

its 10-20€ stone, im happy with it as is, just tempted to get that king 6000 to company it
 

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Looked at ... the video. I like the way the system works. Seems fast, (compared to whetstones) accurate and easy to be consistent. I couldn't deal with a 320 grit edge though...lol I have a 320gr diamond stone and it feels like you're dragging the blade over concrete. Even the 750gr leaves a rougher edge than I prefer. The chef's knife the guy sharpened was tearing at the cut on the conveniently heavy paper the guy was showing the edge with. Sharper than 98% of the knives out there, but still. I have to admit, using the Japanese whetstones takes a lot of "feel" and practice. I often have to test, and rework to get the edge I want. When I'm done the knife will peel a newspaper lying flat on its side with little effort just like you're filleting a fish. I like that Edge Pro Apex System for the repeatability. With 1000 grit or above it would take care of my knife edge compulsion...lol

By the way, the Chef's Choice 15/20 allows you to sharpen a compound edge. Start out with the 15° to thin behind the edge and then a few stroke with the 20° to give the cutting edge a little more strength. I'll often do the same things with my stones. Sharpen the knife and the last very light stroke lift the blade a little to increase the edge angle ever so slightly.
My son-in-law uses The Chef’s Choice 15/20 and speaks well about it. He claims it’s easier than the manual sharpeners.

I never use anything under 750gr. as my first1 or 2 strokes. Then I move straight to 1,000 spending much more time on each side back and forth. Once I have a nice smooth edge at 1,000 grit. I move into the polishing operation with the higher grits. I don’t polish above 3,000 grit purposely. I want some ability to feel the edge as it slides into the cuts as I’m using it. Above 3,000 I feel as though the polished edge becomes a bit to brittle for heavy work. Don’t misunderstand me, I can easily shave with an edge polished to a 3,000 grit finish.

As always, your experience and knowledge add important details to a topic rarely covered very well! Thank you!
 

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i recalled it, i used foot rasp with pretty rough paper in it to prepare the stone, took a while to get rough out from it but im really glad i did that

its 10-20€ stone, im happy with it as is, just tempted to get that king 6000 to company it
I use ... the King 6000gr the most. I don't notice much, if any difference between the 6,000gr & the 8,000gr. There might be a slight difference but with the inconsistency of my technique, a lot of the time I can't tell.
 

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My son-in-law uses The Chef’s Choice 15/20 and speaks well about it. He claims it’s easier than the manual sharpeners.

I never use anything under 750gr. as my first1 or 2 strokes. Then I move straight to 1,000 spending much more time on each side back and forth. Once I have a nice smooth edge at 1,000 grit. I move into the polishing operation with the higher grits. I don’t polish above 3,000 grit purposely. I want some ability to feel the edge as it slides into the cuts as I’m using it. Above 3,000 I feel as though the polished edge becomes a bit to brittle for heavy work. Don’t misunderstand me, I can easily shave with an edge polished to a 3,000 grit finish.

As always, your experience and knowledge add important details to a topic rarely covered very well! Thank you!
I have ... an old high quality German Zwillings/Henckels 8" carving knife I bought 50 years ago when I was first married. For God only knows why, I decided to polish the whole knife to a mirror finish a few years back. Stupid stuff you'd expect a kid to do...lol I began with a polishing stone and quickly found out the knife blade wasn't flat as glass. There were minute dips and high spots along the surface. I went to the 350gr DMT 12" diamond stone trying to work the blade "flat." Worked up to the 6,000gr whetstone. Must have stroked that knife 10,000 times...lol Came out pretty decent but it still has swirls from the 350gr that I gave up trying to polish out. Great knife though. Razor sharp right to the tip. Love it when a bigger knife cuts like a scalpel even at the tip. Makes it cool when you're looking to delicately slice a knuckle ligament or getting into a tight spot.
 

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The trick with oil stones is, to never leave them dirty. You clean the stone by putting a few drops of oil on it, then use your finger to rub the oil into the stone in a circular motion. All the metal gets lifted out of the pores and you take a cloth and wipe it off. repeat twice and they are clean and ready for storage. That is the only trick to it. My oilstones are just as good as the first day I bought them.

JH HUNTER
If you ever get the chance replace the standard stones with diamond stones from Lansky. They are a world apart from the standard stones, not to mention they won't dish out after repeated use on hard blades like M390 or S90V.
 

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I have ... an old high quality German Zwillings/Henckels 8" carving knife I bought 50 years ago when I was first married. For God only knows why, I decided to polish the whole knife to a mirror finish a few years back. Stupid stuff you'd expect a kid to do...lol I began with a polishing stone and quickly found out the knife blade wasn't flat as glass. There were minute dips and high spots along the surface. I went to the 350gr DMT 12" diamond stone trying to work the blade "flat." Worked up to the 6,000gr whetstone. Must have stroked that knife 10,000 times...lol Came out pretty decent but it still has swirls from the 350gr that I gave up trying to polish out. Great knife though. Razor sharp right to the tip. Love it when a bigger knife cuts like a scalpel even at the tip. Makes it cool when you're looking to delicately slice a knuckle ligament or getting into a tight spot.
almost ordered king stone last night, just hesitating for the extra pound in my backpack

now i kinda wish i had knife with an proper blade to justify it, mora is pretty soft
 

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almost ordered king stone last night, just hesitating for the extra pound in my backpack

now i kinda wish i had knife with an proper blade to justify it, mora is pretty soft
Backpack??? Certainly not a thing I'd be carrying afield. I carry a tiny flip open DMT green diamond stone for emergency sharpening. DMT Mini-Sharp (sharpeningsupplies.com) I also have a bigger DMT 6" double diamond stone in the truck for use if we get into a pile of deer and we're "leg & loining" them. It pulls out of a case, reverse the stone and then you plug the stone unit back into the case as a handle. Makes a solid 12" assembly.
 

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Backpack??? Certainly not a thing I'd be carrying afield. I carry a tiny flip open DMT green diamond stone for emergency sharpening. DMT Mini-Sharp (sharpeningsupplies.com) I also have a bigger DMT 6" double diamond stone in the truck for use if we get into a pile of deer and we're "leg & loining" them. It pulls out of a case, reverse the stone and then you plug the stone unit back into the case as a handle. Makes a solid 12" assembly.
planning to spend coming winter(/s) in a woods
my new backpack, 85L

Bag Luggage and bags Backpack Camera accessory Font


sharpening is also something ive been considering as an income source
 

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I have ... an old high quality German Zwillings/Henckels 8" carving knife I bought 50 years ago when I was first married. For God only knows why, I decided to polish the whole knife to a mirror finish a few years back. Stupid stuff you'd expect a kid to do...lol I began with a polishing stone and quickly found out the knife blade wasn't flat as glass. There were minute dips and high spots along the surface. I went to the 350gr DMT 12" diamond stone trying to work the blade "flat." Worked up to the 6,000gr whetstone. Must have stroked that knife 10,000 times...lol Came out pretty decent but it still has swirls from the 350gr that I gave up trying to polish out. Great knife though. Razor sharp right to the tip. Love it when a bigger knife cuts like a scalpel even at the tip. Makes it cool when you're looking to delicately slice a knuckle ligament or getting into a tight spot.
For what little it’s worth, a few years ago I purchased a complete set of jewelers rouges in 6 or 7 different colors. Each color for polishing different types of metals. When coupled with a Dremel tool with a material buffing pad it does an incredible job on everything from my wife’s gold jewelry to my outdoor knives. A year ago I took a 50 year old folding bone handle pocket knife that looked like it was on it’s last legs and brought it back 95% like me new.

As you correctly stated, it’s kids crap doing this stuff, but during the dead of winter when I get board I’m not beyond doing kids crap. The results are often very surprising. Jewelers Rouge removes light scratches and mirror polishes any metal or fiberglass to a like new or better finish as long as you use the correct color for the metal you’re working on.
 

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I purchased one of the following in the past when it was considerably cheaper. It does a super job and gets knives surgical sharp, with little metal loss. The best feature of this is it keeps the same angle with every stroke. You can also adjust for blade angles by placing the guide clamp in different positions. The length of the knife blade is also accommodated by the clamp placement. They do have different sharpeners available and have been in business for at least 40 years.

 

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I purchased one of the following in the past when it was considerably cheaper. It does a super job and gets knives surgical sharp, with little metal loss. The best feature of this is it keeps the same angle with every stroke. You can also adjust for blade angles by placing the guide clamp in different positions. The length of the knife blade is also accommodated by the clamp placement. They do have different sharpeners available and have been in business for at least 40 years.

The fact of the matter when we are talking about the use of different sharpening tools or systems is that it's all about how each of the tools perform in your hands. I've learned over the years that there are people out their that couldn't hold a consistent angle for more than two or three strokes if their life depended on it no matter what you gave them. Conversely, I've seen so good ole' southern boys that can take nothing more than a worn out old leather belt and put the sharpest, polished edge on knife after knife and make it look like child's play. These people have an inborn natural ability when it comes to sharpening. These are the people that everybody comes to with their knives while in hunting camp and beg him to please do their knives.

Clearly, there are some sharpeners that are better than others, but factually they are what's recommended for use by those of us that don't have that extreme level of natural ability that I was referring to. We need to learn to sharpen thru working at it. It's for this reason that I won't put down what other people use. I know what works for me, but plenty of other people get good results with other products. The key is to learn what works best for you and then stay with it. There's no such thing when it comes to sharpening as a one size fits all!
 

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I've use most all of the systems stated. In the shop, my go to sharpeners are paper wheels.
Hi Roadweasel,
If you get a chance could you post a picture of what you mean by "paper wheels"? I can't say I'm familiar with what these things are.

To my knowledge paper is usually a major dulling substance to knife edges, so I'm completely open to learn about things I know nothing about.
 

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Sharpest cutting tools I've ever seen were the "knives" used by a neighbor who was a custom saddle maker. Not hunting knives for sure but my goodness he would make intricate cuts on 1/4" leather like I cut warm butter. It's been 30+ years since he passed on and I can't remember the machine he used anymore but I believe he always finished his edges on a flat disc with a piece of cardboard glued to it. I know the machine had two or three stations on it but I don't recall if they were all discs or a combination of wheels and discs.
I've always heard the term scary sharp and if not for his knives I'd never have believed that it existed. But those tools were scary sharp!
 

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Hi Roadweasel,
If you get a chance could you post a picture of what you mean by "paper wheels"? I can't say I'm familiar with what these things are.

To my knowledge paper is usually a major dulling substance to knife edges, so I'm completely open to learn about things I know nothing about.
These are NOT grinding wheels. It's a two part system using two different wheels, one with fine grit, one to polish. I bought a cheap Harbor freight grinder, took it off the base, and turned it around so that the wheels spin backwards, up and away from you. Or, I guess you could just mount it backwards with the switch in the back. You don't use any guards or rests. Here is a link to them (lots out there), and one to a YouTube video. Lots of them too and all are slightly different. It works well and is fast. Hope this helps.

PS- I see the picture in the video below, the guy just mounted it backwards.


 
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