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It seems like the farther away from the target I get the more off my bolts start to lean one direction I have my reticle straight is it because my scope isn’t perfectly square with my crossbow? Should a tilt the scope a bit to adjust this to where it’s hitting? Or should I just sight my scope in at the farther ranges and except the little bit off I will be horizontally at closer ranges
 

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It seems like the farther away from the target I get the more off my bolts start to lean one direction I have my reticle straight is it because my scope isn’t perfectly square with my crossbow? Should a tilt the scope a bit to adjust this to where it’s hitting? Or should I just sight my scope in at the farther ranges and except the little bit off I will be horizontally at closer ranges
Your scope should be level with your shooting rail.
Use 2 levels at a time.
Put one on the shooting rail of your xbow.
Put the other on your scope.
Make sure both are level.

Also, you should use a bubble level on the xbow itself to make sure that you are not tilting (canting) the crossbow when shooting.
A little cant can make a huge difference at longer ranges.
 

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It seems like the farther away from the target I get the more off my bolts start to lean one direction
Sounds like you might need some windage adjustment.

I like to fine tune mine at about 50 yards.
 

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What target are you using reason I ask is I have seen something like your describing shooting into a Yellow Jacket Bag.
 

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Your scope should be level with your shooting rail.
Use 2 levels at a time.
Put one on the shooting rail of your xbow.
Put the other on your scope.
Make sure both are level.

Also, you should use a bubble level on the xbow itself to make sure that you are not tilting (canting) the crossbow when shooting.
A little cant can make a huge difference at longer ranges.
Yup, what he said for sure!
 

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Are your arrows actually LEANING or are they walking away from the bullseye the farther you back away from the target?!?
 

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You need to loosen the scope rings and barely turn your scope to the left.
 

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The farther away I back up the farther they go to the right idk what kind of levels I’d need for a crossbow and I shoot a block target
To level the crossbow and scope, use two little 9" torpedo levels, such as these:

To avoid cant (tilt) get a bubble level for crossbows, such as these:
 
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Your scope should be level with your shooting rail.
Use 2 levels at a time.
Put one on the shooting rail of your xbow.
Put the other on your scope.
Make sure both are level.
I put one level on the rail, and have another level, a line, or something at a distance to align the horizontal crosshair with (some use a plumb bob and align the vertical crosshair with it).

I'm not confident a level sitting on a small diameter turret is always going to be parallel with the crosshair.
 

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I put one level on the rail, and have another level, a line, or something at a distance to align the horizontal crosshair with (some use a plumb bob and align the vertical crosshair with it).

I'm not confident a level sitting on a small diameter turret is always going to be parallel with the crosshair.
Yup, that is probably better, thanks TP.
It is kind of hard to balance the level on a turret and who knows if the turret is is level with the scopes' horizontal crosshair.
 

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The farther away I back up the farther they go to the right idk what kind of levels I’d need for a crossbow and I shoot a block target
Likely a cam timing issue on a compound....Assuming all else is proper.
 

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TP is correct in assuming that placing the level on the turret is not an automatic. On the Evo X scope, the turret caps are slightly domed anyway, so that was a no go for me. I invested in a Wheeler Engineering scope mounting/leveling kit. Not cheap, but when you are constantly mounting scopes it is worth the $. I added a bubble level to my scope rail, and used several levels to accomplish my mounting. First obviously, is making sure the bow is level. I did this using my MTM rifle cleaning station, and used a level on the center of the rail, and a level across the limbs simultaneously. Both of those levels matched the TP bubble level mounted on my scope rail. Once I knew the bow was level, it was time to make sure the scope was level. This can be done any number of ways, but the easiest is like TP said, using a level string as a reference to make sure your crosshair is level. The hardest part of all of this is actually tightening down the scope without it moving at all. I just very gingerly tighten down each screw a little at a time, alternating opposite corners and making sure the ring gap remains even on both sides. Once I have it tight enough that it will not move, I bring in the Wheeler Fat Wrench and torque the screws to the recommended inch pounds.
 

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Start by being sure scope is level and timing is good. I use a level and I have a vertical line from a level drawn where I mount my scopes. A plumb bob is same principal. I have a small level on bow to prevent me canting the bow.
 

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I put my crossbows in a Caldwell field pod and use one level to check and make certain the limbs and rail are both level and then level the scope and tighten it down. Then I go back and check everything again to make certain all are still correct. I also have a small level off the left side of the scope rail and it agrees with all the others also. :)
 

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Your scope should be level with your shooting rail.
Use 2 levels at a time.
Put one on the shooting rail of your xbow.
Put the other on your scope.
Make sure both are level.

Also, you should use a bubble level on the xbow itself to make sure that you are not tilting (canting) the crossbow when shooting.
A little cant can make a huge difference at longer ranges.
There is potential fault in installing the scope level with the body of the scope. The reason some scope's bodies are squared up the reticle. It is better to install the scope with the vertical crosshair with something that is truly perpendicular like a structure or a plumbed line. That is my experience.
 
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TP is correct in assuming that placing the level on the turret is not an automatic. On the Evo X scope, the turret caps are slightly domed anyway, so that was a no go for me. I invested in a Wheeler Engineering scope mounting/leveling kit. Not cheap, but when you are constantly mounting scopes it is worth the $. I added a bubble level to my scope rail, and used several levels to accomplish my mounting. First obviously, is making sure the bow is level. I did this using my MTM rifle cleaning station, and used a level on the center of the rail, and a level across the limbs simultaneously. Both of those levels matched the TP bubble level mounted on my scope rail. Once I knew the bow was level, it was time to make sure the scope was level. This can be done any number of ways, but the easiest is like TP said, using a level string as a reference to make sure your crosshair is level. The hardest part of all of this is actually tightening down the scope without it moving at all. I just very gingerly tighten down each screw a little at a time, alternating opposite corners and making sure the ring gap remains even on both sides. Once I have it tight enough that it will not move, I bring in the Wheeler Fat Wrench and torque the screws to the recommended inch pounds.
If one is doing the best assembly of the crossbow they will put levels on the rail and rise assembly to make sure they are on plane with each other to prevent canting. Then later no need to check both while mounting the scope. Lot of work but best for true shooting.
 
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