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Discussion Starter #1
Was shooting field points yesterday and decided to shoot broadheads due to seeing so many hogs on my trail cam that need to have a good dose of BBQ sauce...
They all shot 2" low & 1" left, pretty substantial difference. Aren't there any FP & BH that shoot the same? I want to be able to practice between hunts without having to sight in each head everytime I switch.
Is this just the way it is?
TIA
WTZ
 

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I have been reading alot about this subject myself lately and from what im getting the mechanical broadheads are more accurate and consistent than some of the fixed broadheads.As for which ones,thats the million dollar question,im still working on that one.However there is alot of guys doing alot of testing that will help you some more.Look at my topic of Mechanical vs fixed broadheads in here.They have given some great information there as well.
 

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Big part of it is your shaft spine. May be awesome to shoot field points with but, add some extra broadhead resistance and, well you see what you get. Using Tapps with the stiffest spine available and, even adding extra carbon sleeves to make them even stiffer has worked very well for me. All my Slick Trick standards fly about 1/2" lower than field points at any given distance I shoot but, always hold the same vertical plane which is what you want. Yep broadheads have a little more air resistance than field points in flight.
Another biggie is to test spin your heads. The Pine Ridge arrow inspector is a gotta have for every xbow enthusiast.
 

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Even Nap Double Cross shoot lower than field points. I always practice with actual broadhead. Try threading a needle on a turkey at 60 yards in the woods with a arrow that doesn't shoot exactly as field points . Always have bow shooting to what you hunt with. I have 2 bows set up for targets only. 30 to 40 days before season rest of bows are set to what I hunt with.
 

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First off you must have decent arrows. That said....Ive had good luck shooting Swhackers 125 gr, Rocket Steelheads (old style) 125 gr, and the Torrid SS 100 gr. If there was any adjust made with any of these between field points and the bh's I easily made the adjustment by moving the speed ring ever so slightly. The most difference I saw with any of these bh's was maybe shooting 3" low out to 45 yards and that's stretching it. At closer ranges it was less than that. As far as windage adjustments....none were needed from either my Excal Vortex or my Sniper 370. Hope this helps.
 

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First off you must have decent arrows. That said....Ive had good luck shooting Swhackers 125 gr, Rocket Steelheads (old style) 125 gr, and the Torrid SS 100 gr. If there was any adjust made with any of these between field points and the bh's I easily made the adjustment by moving the speed ring ever so slightly. The most difference I saw with any of these bh's was maybe shooting 3" low out to 45 yards and that's stretching it. At closer ranges it was less than that. As far as windage adjustments....none were needed from either my Excal Vortex or my Sniper 370. Hope this helps.
Exactly it is the extra drag and with good arrows it is only speed ring or tape for Jackplate or HHA
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Big part of it is your shaft spine. May be awesome to shoot field points with but, add some extra broadhead resistance and, well you see what you get. Using Tapps with the stiffest spine available and, even adding extra carbon sleeves to make them even stiffer has worked very well for me. All my Slick Trick standards fly about 1/2" lower than field points at any given distance I shoot but, always hold the same vertical plane which is what you want. Yep broadheads have a little more air resistance than field points in flight.
Another biggie is to test spin your heads. The Pine Ridge arrow inspector is a gotta have for every xbow enthusiast.
C-T, thank you for the insight regarding the different dynamics between fp & bh. I don't think this would have crossed my mind as a consideration at this point of my xbow knowledge. This being so would would I be correct in presuming mechanicals would create less resistance?
Also I'll look into an arrow spinner/checker thingy!
WTZ
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Even Nap Double Cross shoot lower than field points. I always practice with actual broadhead. Try threading a needle on a turkey at 60 yards in the woods with a arrow that doesn't shoot exactly as field points . Always have bow shooting to what you hunt with. I have 2 bows set up for targets only. 30 to 40 days before season rest of bows are set to what I hunt with.
I clearly understand to practice with one is going to hunt with.
My budget is one bow for now, and I am grateful it's a quality bow. This is why my choices of components are so important for me.
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C-T, thank you for the insight regarding the different dynamics between fp & bh. I don't think this would have crossed my mind as a consideration at this point of my xbow knowledge. This being so would would I be correct in presuming mechanicals would create less resistance?
Also I'll look into an arrow spinner/checker thingy!
WTZ
Yes in most cases. There are some larger profile mechanical contraptions too.lol
Some mechanicals parts can move on launch too and, that throws everything out of whack more-so than any profile resistance issue.
 

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Simplest answer, if ALL your broadheads hit 2” low, 1” left, sight in for them. Accept that your field points will hit a little high right. As Crappie Tom said, good broadhead flight is mostly excellent quality arrows, matched to the crossbow. I recently got my heavy draw (295#) recurve ready to hunt. With Tactical Tapps or BEEs, it shoots my Ramcats about 3” low. With Spynal Tapps, it puts them right with field points out to 50 yards and within a 1” circle. Difference is the stiffer spine of the Tapps.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
First off you must have decent arrows. That said....Ive had good luck shooting Swhackers 125 gr, Rocket Steelheads (old style) 125 gr, and the Torrid SS 100 gr. If there was any adjust made with any of these between field points and the bh's I easily made the adjustment by moving the speed ring ever so slightly. The most difference I saw with any of these bh's was maybe shooting 3" low out to 45 yards and that's stretching it. At closer ranges it was less than that. As far as windage adjustments....none were needed from either my Excal Vortex or my Sniper 370. Hope this helps.
It does GBM, thx! My bh shots being low didn't bother me so much as the windage bring off...
I wanted to hunt those hogs eating all my corn with the arrows I have however perhaps I should wait for my STs then continue testing.
Do any mechanicals offer practice tips for their bhs other than Rage?
Are rage any good?
Thx again!
Exactly it is the extra drag and with good arrows it is only speed ring or tape for Jackplate or HHA
I know what a speed ring is but what tape have to do with a jackplate/hha whatever..?
Thx!
Yes in most cases. There are some larger profile mechanical contraptions too.lol
Some mechanicals parts can move on launch too and, that throws everything out of whack more-so than any profile resistance issue.
So my question would obviously be what top 2/3 should I consider & what do I absolutely stay away from? (I shoot a Mission Sub1)
Tia!
 

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I don't trust shooting any broadhead at an animal that I haven't tested, including practice heads. I've found even practice heads like Rage or Swhacker can fly a little different than the actual broadhead. Can just put tape around your actual BH on those and shoot them for practice.

I bought a blob target this year so I can shoot my broadheads primarily the month or two leading up to the season. If you're worried about POI with BH's vs FP's, make sure you have good arrows and that you're spin testing your broadheads to ensure you have no wobble. IMO, I don't really care if my BH's shoot different than my FP's as long as my BH's are flying true and consistently.

What I've done in the past is noted where my field points hit when my crossbow is sighted in for broadheads and place a target sticker at that sight so when I aim at my bullseye I would expect to see the field point hit where the other target sticker is.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Simplest answer, if ALL your broadheads hit 2” low, 1” left, sight in for them. Accept that your field points will hit a little high right. As Crappie Tom said, good broadhead flight is mostly excellent quality arrows, matched to the crossbow. I recently got my heavy draw (295#) recurve ready to hunt. With Tactical Tapps or BEEs, it shoots my Ramcats about 3” low. With Spynal Tapps, it puts them right with field points out to 50 yards and within a 1” circle. Difference is the stiffer spine of the Tapps.
Understood,thx! I'm just going to shoot what came with the bow for now & wait on my STs then see what to work on from. There.
Cheers!
 

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I know what a speed ring is but what tape have to do with a jackplate/hha whatever..?
Zombie... Noticed you didn't get an answer to this. Both devices change the scope elevation angle to compensate for vertical error at a given range. Tapes with variable range marks allow one to calibrate the device to the launch velocity for your specific setup. During setup for HHA, one selects the one tape that best fits 20 and 60 yard zero. When you know the range to the target, you simply rotate the elevation dial to the mark for that range. Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Simplest answer, if ALL your broadheads hit 2” low, 1” left, sight in for them. Accept that your field points will hit a little high right. As Crappie Tom said, good broadhead flight is mostly excellent quality arrows, matched to the crossbow. I recently got my heavy draw (295#) recurve ready to hunt. With Tactical Tapps or BEEs, it shoots my Ramcats about 3” low. With Spynal Tapps, it puts them right with field points out to 50 yards and within a 1” circle. Difference is the stiffer spine of the Tapps.
That's what I like to hear! Hope mine get here pretty soon...
 
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