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Does it matter how I put my cocking rope on the string...opening of hook facing up towards me, or down away from me?

Barnett rep told me that I need to have hook openings facing up for my Raptor. I just got a new Micro 355 and was wondering if it makes any difference for the Excaliburs?
 

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On the raptor the hooks must face up to engage the safety. you'll notice there is a small tab on One side of the hook supplied with your crossbow its larger on one end than the other.
On the Excalibar I don't think it matters I just use mine facing down remember to set the safety as soon as you cock it
 

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For me it seems to be easier to have the hooks down as I have mine adjusted where I have to pull the string up 8" to 10" to set them. This makes for a shorter cocking stroke.
 

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I have a Matrix 355 and I face the hooks up, the Excal manual is not specific on which direction to face the hooks. But I just watched the instruction video on the Excalibur site for using the rope cocking aid, the guy puts the hooks on facing down. So guess I will starting doing it that way too.

http://www.excaliburcrossbow.com/videos/player/375
I always have and will continue to position them in the Down Position .
Watch the same video by " Bill Troubridge" "Mr Excalibur" when I first purchased my Excalibur Equinox.

I feel in the down position mechanically they "claws" apply while drawing back on the string a downward force on the string towards the rail. Creating a more stable even draw back to the trigger claws
But that being said I also believe what ever works best for you is the way to go.
 

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For me it seems to be easier to have the hooks down as I have mine adjusted where I have to pull the string up 8" to 10" to set them. This makes for a shorter cocking stroke.
Mine is also adjusted but since I was never told which way mattered Ive always turned the hooks up. It just works better for me that way I guess. On my bow it wouldnt matter. Not sure about yours though.
 
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Just got done shooting the bow and wanted to re-state how I turn the hooks. I turn my hooks DOWN (and always have). Sorry for any misguiding or confusion.
 
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The instructional video states that hooks are down. Does it make a difference? I do not know but it is easier to hook them downward when preparing to cock the bow.
 

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Down makes more sense to me. The string can't slip down because of the rail. I suppose that this is really an insignificant distinction as the string is under too much tension to slip, anyway.
 

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Opening of the hook up. If the hook fails it will come off towards your shin. If the opening is down and the hook fails it flings up and toward your face
 

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Opening of the hook up. If the hook fails it will come off towards your shin. If the opening is down and the hook fails it flings up and toward your face
That's good rational but I think it depends on the xbow whether it' holds... my Accudraw 50 pulls at a slight downward angle so if it fails the force is still towards my shins. I think it would apply to my Jackal though.

I suspect overall it's about convenience... unless the rope mfg does something with the hook design to need a specific orientation.
 

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Opening of the hook up. If the hook fails it will come off towards your shin. If the opening is down and the hook fails it flings up and toward your face
My way of thinking to, at this years ATA Show I saw two different brands of rope cocker hooks fail (break) and the broken hook hit the guy's in the foot instead of flying back towards their face....

Mike
 

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My way of thinking to, at this years ATA Show I saw two different brands of rope cocker hooks fail (break) and the broken hook hit the guy's in the foot instead of flying back towards their face....

Mike
I've seen it too. Saw an eye injured pretty badly.
Most hooks put the pressure in line with the pulley. And would pull evenly either direction, so why risk it?
 
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