Crossbow Nation banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
115 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Is a Crossbow bolt just a cutdown arrow
or is there something special about a Crossbow bolt
that makes them different from a standard arrow?
.
.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
11,568 Posts
Yes

A crossbow ARROW is just that, a short arrow with a different nock, either flat or half moon shape :)
 

·
Incurable Tinkerer
Joined
·
5,031 Posts
IMO, Crossbows can use both bolts and arrows. Early crossbows used bolts, just pieces of metal that were shaped like darts without vanes. Modern C bows use arrows BUT they are not the kind used for most vertical bows. Not only are they shorter but of heavier construction to handle the increased draw weight of a C bow. A 20" crossbow arrow shaft can weigh more than a 30" shaft of a vert bow arrow. As a result, the latter is to light for all but the weakest crossbows, when they are cut down to fit a crossbow, and can cause a partial dryfire or shattered arrow if so used. Neither if good for the bow or one's health.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
242 Posts
You can use regular arrow shafts to make crossbow arrows/bolts. Mine are 2219s which are the same shafting that they make 2219 longer arrows out of for verticle bows. Exactly the same stuff and you can use the Easton charts to figure grains per inch of shafting.
 

·
Obsessed Huntress
Joined
·
5,583 Posts
What we use are arrows. Bolts have no fletchings. It was a term carried over from the olden days. Being long or short doesn't make any difference since arrows come in all different lengths for different draw lengths, or rail lengths. So doesn't matter if it's 20 inches or 30 inches. An arrow is an arrow.
What's interesting is we also bow fish and those projectiles are still called arrows though they have no fletchings. Hmmmm? Named by bow hunters I suppose. I think this is an interesting subject when your battling the bow hunters and they say that crossbow is NOT archery equipment because THEY shoot bolts. Nope, they are arrows.
I also think it is important for us crossbow shooters to start calling them arrows instead of bolts as well so this term is accepted in Archery related conversation, and there's one less off the wall point that is made as far as differences in the two styles of bows. We do have control over our language we use when discussing this subject so we should be the ones to correct this so others follow.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
11,568 Posts
GG

Exactly. I stood on the ATA flooor 2 years ago and asked all the crossbow manufacturers there to stop referring to them as something other than arrows and explained the logic of that. I know it's difficult for some that tend not to take into consideration what we crossbow shooters are up against to say "hey, they were called bolts 900 years ago , why should I call them arrows now"? My response is "hey, they were not in the middle of trying to get crossbows included in their bowhunting seasons 900 years ago -there is a difference, don't you think'?:D:p
 

·
Member
Joined
·
42 Posts
The thing about crossbow arrows I'm curious about is why I see the majority of them at about 20" in length. Is it purely because they are then able to be used with Broadheads or is there some other reason?

At the moment I am useing 17" length arrows, but if there is an advantage of useing longer ones then I may well switch over.
 

·
Obsessed Huntress
Joined
·
5,583 Posts
66606 said:
The thing about crossbow arrows I'm curious about is why I see the majority of them at about 20" in length. Is it purely because they are then able to be used with Broadheads or is there some other reason?

At the moment I am useing 17" length arrows, but if there is an advantage of useing longer ones then I may well switch over.
It has to do with the bow you use, and the rail length. Use what the manufacturer recommends for that particular bow. Barnetts used to use 22" and Hortons use 20", so they are different for the different product lines.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
1,223 Posts
Horton says between 17" and 20" for the Recon. 20+" shoot fine in the Recon. I say 20+" because it seems that very few are exactly....any, even measurement. 20.25" or 20.50" or 20.875" or....
Most of my "arrows"...are between 20" and 22". The four that come with the Recon are 17", blazer type vanes.
I make sure I only shoot the 22" in the Stryker and the Darton Impact.
The rest get a diet of what ever is close at hand....aluminum, carbon fiber, all have field/practice tips

I have some OLD...15" from the Barnett Commando days.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Interesting, enlightening discussion. My dictionary defines bolt as an arrow used in a crossbow. I appreciate Moon's position and will hereafter call what I shoot arrows. Things are what we call them.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
327 Posts
I have Easton 22" Carbon arrows and 125g field points for my Impact (4" vanes). NOt being as experienced as most members here, I'd go by what the manufacturer recommends.

My next set of six will be 2219 Aluminum shafts ordered from the Darton catalog so I can compare each type of arrow... bolt... shaft... whatever :eek:
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
224 Posts
Sparhawk said:
I have Easton 22" Carbon arrows and 125g field points for my Impact (4" vanes). NOt being as experienced as most members here, I'd go by what the manufacturer recommends.

My next set of six will be 2219 Aluminum shafts ordered from the Darton catalog so I can compare each type of arrow... bolt... shaft... whatever :eek:
Have fun with it :D

I did that and wound back up on carbon.
It was fun though.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
1,426 Posts
carbon aluminum ARROWS FOR CROSS BOWS..(

whatever they are called : I will adopt arrows for obvious reasons... I have always sort of been secretly fearful of carbon... afraid of an undetected crack and a splintered shaft through the arm or something.. feel a little safer with a xbow due to twhre the hand and arm are positioned... but how likely is it my arrow could have an undetectable flaw or damaged area and thus present a problem ? ir it strikes a hard surface during a miss or a pass thru... then should I inspect it or discard it....? the arrow, I mean.. thanks... if you want to call it bolt and answer that is fne, I will understand what you mean.. LOL
dk
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,085 Posts
It is very rare that a carbon arrow ever explodes or splinters while shooting. Sometime, in cases like you mentioned, it can damage the arrow. A simple flex test before you shoot it will normally revile a cracked or broken arrow. Just grab each end of the arrow and bend it away from you. You'll be suprised at how much pressure you can put on these things. And unlike aluminum, you don't have to worry about bending them. Really, the only time you need to do that is if you miss the target, hit something hard in the target, or smack the side of a shaft because you are group shooting. They are pretty tough and I think the benefits of using them out way the disadvantages. Just MHO.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
258 Posts
Im starting to feel that way to,never thought I would switch,
guess an old dog can learn a new trick once in awhile!:)
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top