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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Our new Perma-Serve serving material is showing that it is a fix for today's very aggressive crossbow serving wear. So we have started a reserving process for anyone who has a bow that is eating the center serving.

Scorpyd has changed to this material, it is now the go to material for all new Scorpyd Strings.

It does not matter what bow you have we can reserve the center serving. This stuff is so good we are offering an 800 shot guarantee, if the center serving fails before 800 shot and you have followed our maintenance requirements we will reserve it free!

Note we only do repair on the center serving. Our stretcher is setup just for this purpose and is not capable of end serving or end loop repair so your string must be in good shape to qualify

  1. Scorpyd Death Stalker owners will need to change to Firenock Q nocks after we have reserved

    www.scorpyd-maintenance.com
 

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How about Excalibur strings, can you re-serve those?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Yes, any crossbow string
 

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Good to know about the center serving process. I like to reserve my strings yearly and my local archery store has shut down and I am too busy to do it myself. I will contact when I am ready. Just don't let the Chinese bat bug get you. LOL
 

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Jerry ...is this stuff comparable to other servings as far as cost? How much is it if we send you a string>?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Jerry ...is this stuff comparable to other servings as far as cost? How much is it if we send you a string>?
I am going to charge 20.00 to reserve a string or you can buy a spool for 19.95 if you like serving your own strings

But it must be put on under about 300 pound of stretching force and ther server must be capable of around 20 pound of pressure when the serving is applied
 

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Discussion Starter #10
You mention maintenance requirement. What are the maintenance requirements?
I have been dealing with string issues for the last 5 years

And there is one thing that I have learned and I'm 100% sure of

At least 7 out of 10 crossbow owners do not maintain their center serving properly

This material is by far the best I have ever used

It does not stretch, its dry when it goes on and under pressure develops a light fuzz which grabs wax like a magnet on steel

And the key to long life is waxing it every 10 shots. If this is not done the serving will not last

So it is a must and if you think you have enough wax add just a tat more
 

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As to waxing...
I have been using Venom serving conditioner as opposed to wax. I have had a waxed serving jump flat nocks a few times and this is why I stopped using wax. What do you recommend... Which would not cause the condition/problem I mention.


I have been dealing with string issues for the last 5 years

And there is one thing that I have learned and I'm 100% sure of

At least 7 out of 10 crossbow owners do not maintain their center serving properly

This material is by far the best I have ever used

It does not stretch, its dry when it goes on and under pressure develops a light fuzz which grabs wax like a magnet on steel

And the key to long life is waxing it every 10 shots. If this is not done the serving will not last

So it is a must and if you think you have enough wax add just a tat more
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
As to waxing...
I have been using Venom serving conditioner as opposed to wax. I have had a waxed serving jump flat nocks a few times and this is why I stopped using wax. What do you recommend... Which would not cause the condition/problem I mention.
If I had a bow come in that the customer felt wax caused the string to jump the nock i would have the customer show me how he/she applies wax to make sure way too much wax was the issue

To be honest my first thought is if a bow is going under or over a flat not its something other than the wax

I would want to see the arrow or arrows that were involved in the incident

But, Maintenance includes cleaning and removing excess wax buildup

After 3 or 4 shooting sessions I suggest cleaning the bow and trigger to remove build up. The string should be cleaned and conditioned as well.

I think you should condition a string with the wax you intend to use. Using a conditioner could place a film on the string preventing wax from sticking well

I like black lightning, BCY X wax, scorpion venom wax and I have a wax I make in house that is 100% silicone & very fine Teflon powder that works really well, but any good hard wax will work

I have neglected to say the most important 1st step when setting up a new string and that is to burnish the wax into the center serving on the first use of a new string and after every cleaning

Burnishing melts the wax which allows the wax to flow deeper into the serving

This gives the wax a solid foundation to help it grip the serving for longer life
 

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I have always been told by some really great string makers not to over wax strings and servings. I have a few strings with over 1000 shots on them that are still usable and the servings were only waxed when they appeared to be drying out. I currently have a few hundred shots on a DS 420 with a Marty string that is only waxed as stated above and it still looks almost new.
I would think the advice you are giving about waxing every ten shots and cleaning your strings and triggers every few shooting sessions might apply to only a few crossbows out there and 1 in particular. Am I wrong?
 

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Robert, I’ve used Rail Snot on the rails for years. Usually every 10-12 shots. Light application. Seems to have worked well. Light waxing of string and serving lub has worked well for me.
 

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Sounds Good.
When this happened to me, I used wax removed to remove the wax on serving and then went to the conditioner I mentioned. Same arrows/string and it never happened again.
This said...
I did not burnish the wax into the serving, as I would normally do on the actual string itself....Which is a normal procedure.

O.K. ... I will try this again and by your recommendation. Thank you.

If I had a bow come in that the customer felt wax caused the string to jump the nock i would have the customer show me how he/she applies wax to make sure way too much wax was the issue

To be honest my first thought is if a bow is going under or over a flat not its something other than the wax

I would want to see the arrow or arrows that were involved in the incident

But, Maintenance includes cleaning and removing excess wax buildup

After 3 or 4 shooting sessions I suggest cleaning the bow and trigger to remove build up. The string should be cleaned and conditioned as well.

I think you should condition a string with the wax you intend to use. Using a conditioner could place a film on the string preventing wax from sticking well

I like black lightning, BCY X wax, scorpion venom wax and I have a wax I make in house that is 100% silicone & very fine Teflon powder that works really well, but any good hard wax will work

I have neglected to say the most important 1st step when setting up a new string and that is to burnish the wax into the center serving on the first use of a new string and after every cleaning

Burnishing melts the wax which allows the wax to flow deeper into the serving

This gives the wax a solid foundation to help it grip the serving for longer life
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I have always been told by some really great string makers not to over wax strings and servings. I have a few strings with over 1000 shots on them that are still usable and the servings were only waxed when they appeared to be drying out. I currently have a few hundred shots on a DS 420 with a Marty string that is only waxed as stated above and it still looks almost new.
I would think the advice you are giving about waxing every ten shots and cleaning your strings and triggers every few shooting sessions might apply to only a few crossbows out there and 1 in particular. Am I wrong?
Yes you are correct, if the bow doesn't eat serving by all means go lighter on maintenance

My development of this serving was for the most aggressive bows

Also I agree with the opinions from string makers on 95% of bows. but when it comes to ravin, scorpyd, tenpoint etc really narrow and fast bows if you don't keep wax on the center serving it won't hold up.

On a side note Marty is a huge asset for this group. He has the tools and developed the skills needed to make strings that last.
 
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