Crossbow Nation banner

21 - 25 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
I dont know if there is truly a good brand or type of flashlight or headlamp that helps illuminate blood spots for tracking.
Any first hand experience would be greatly appreciated.
Peroxide, as suggested above, is a great call. Biggest thing I've learned is to treat the blood trail like a forensic scene. A lot of people destroy evidence by getting excited, going too fast and walking over fine blood spots that can tell a lot of the story. Once you put together a general direction of travel an animal has taken, think like an animal- what would be the most logical path for you to take if you had a ton of adrenaline pumping? Generally, they will run like a source of water- downhill, with the least resistance. That and any of the bright white lights are a good start.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,140 Posts
I use whatever light is handy, mostly a cheap visor light. Mostly only looking for a white belly where I heard the crash but if needed will break out a 4 AA cell LED diving light to track. One trick that I swear by is the TP marking of every spot of blood or track at waist height. After a few bounds are marked you can usually get a clear direction of travel. I have also heard of people using those travel size shaving creams to mark their blood but not so keen about putting that fragrance around the woods.
The best advice for recovery that I have is to slow down, relax, and pay attention. Mark where you were sitting and go to where the deer was standing and put TP or marking tape at deer's chest height. If the arrow isn't easily seen, go back to where you were sitting and line up a laser pointer with the marker at the deer's chest level. Hate to jinx myself but have never lost an arrow using this method and I stillhunt or sit on the ground in different spots most every day. Even when I watch the deer drop, I go back and track it for practice and experience. I will never ever leave a deer overnight in most places because it would be eaten by coyotes or bears within hours of me leaving the woods. I also advocate aggressively tracking any animal that is bleeding. The only time I would give them more than 1/2 hour is if I knew it was a gut shot but haven't been there in 51 years of hunting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
979 Posts
Low light? Start with lighted nock. First thirty yards are a gimmie before you even put the bow down if you don't passthru. Passthru lighted nock tells where to look for first blood and hair. Shot a doe at last light last night at 10 yards from 17' ladder stand. Had to back off the red dot to lowest setting to see where I was aiming. Looked like a bad shoulder shot as she bounded off through backyard next door and into woods. Great disappointment. Resigned to an all night track or lost deer. Pulled out my NRA freebie 9-LED triple AAA tracking light. Venous blood at point of impact, but no passthru and I saw the nock waving like a flag as she ran off. Easy track with steady blood until I found the arrow. Ramcat BH lost all three blades and backed out. Shaft was soaked with blood but fletching was spotless. Doe was 10 yards away. What I had seen was shaft buried to the fletching and BH protruding from brisket. Shot doe was leading another doe and I could only see the rear doe, but the light on the lead doe was out of sync with the rear doe and appeared to be waving. As I write this, the doe is rapidly becoming sausage, jerky, filet medallions. :D Note: With this track as with many others on flat ground, the deer made a very sharp 90 degree turn about mid-track. I'm guessing that when a wounded deer lays down it is at right angles to its path of travel, so when it gets up, it continues in the direction it is facing. In this case it was back in the direction of the stand, ending only 15 yards into the woods.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Old style coleman gas lantern. Used them many times, best light for tracking after dark. something about the soft glow makes the blood shine.
Used them for years. Just the best there is. The shade directs the light down from your eyes. Seems to make the blood more visable to my eyes. And hells to keep your hands warm
Drop
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
167 Posts
I know this is an old thread... But, a good one.

I like a good headlamp; then again I'm a Miner. Best method is a good shot. Then give the animal a little time. Then take your time; work it out slow. Stay out of the sign; I always carry some tissue to mark the last blood, as I work forward.

Miner
 
21 - 25 of 25 Posts
Top