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A friend of mine who does not hunt, asked me ,Tim,,,why do you hunt? Is it the kill? I guess , I suppose after a bit of thought.....The kill is the fulfillment of the hunt. We hunt to be alone, to observe wildlife without being observed ourselves, to face one of the greatest challenges in this world: to take a wild animal on his own turf, using our brain and little else. Forget the wild tales you may have heard about "automatic" guns and telescopic sites. When it comes right down to it, those things are no good unless you can create an opportunity to use them. We don't swagger into the woods and slay Bambi when he meekly peeks from behind a tree. We have to use every sense, every bit of experience we have, and when we accomplish our goal, it's a milestone. I once watched a videotape on hunting that theorized that, on the average, if you are hunting and get a chance at a deer, that chance will last 7 seconds. In my experience, that's not far off. Sometimes you'll have longer, sometimes not that long, but 7 seconds is just about average. Think of what it takes to be alert and ready, and to make an honest, clean shot on an animal that always believes there's danger behind every tree! In those 7 seconds you must verify that it is, indeed, a legal animal, find a chance to shoot (not easy when you're in brushy coal mine country of Harrison County), and you must usually remain undetected by those roving eyes and swivelling ears. What a high! The adrenalin rush I get from it is like nothing else in this world. The fulfillment of long hard hours of hunting is definitely worth it! So , Mike.....there is my answer. LoL!!!
 

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its all about being in the woods alone, its about the scenery, its about the hunt, its about strategizing for the hunt, its about witnessing gods creation up close and personal, its about the blessing of having the opportunity to hunt, and to top it off with a deer in the back of your pick up truck is the ultimate reward, and to eat what you kill is the most natural thing you can do as a human
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Update-- I took this guy turkey hunting. He carried a camera. It couldn't have been better. The Tom was talking constantly, he came a long way.......he strutted in to tangle with my decoy about 10ft from the blind. When asked what he thought about that .....he said wow, that was exciting!!!! I never realized , and nor did he, just how excited he was....until we watched the footage on the big screen , with surround sound....HOW HILARIOUS!!!!! It was the worst footage I've ever viewed...he was shaking so bad, it was like the camera was mounted on a jack hammer.....his labored breathing from the adrenalin was like a xxx movie. I said Mike......what the heck? He said I almost blacked out.....that was a rush!! I said Mike....why do you hunt? He said touché' !!! I told him if he thought that got his blood going...wait till a bruiser buck is walking your way......he said.......I am buying a xbow....can I have it shipped to your house??? ROFLMAO!!!! I said YOU BET!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Ghostgoblin,

Hunting and our prey made us what we are today. We are wired to hunt. It helped define who and what we are. A study by Jan Dizard demonstrates three of the values of hunting in human terms. (1) It is a form of historical re-enactment; (2) it embodies an honest relationship between humans and nature; and (3) it keeps alive the ideal of self-reliance which ideal is argued by some scholars to be the only distinctive American contribution to political philosophy. The historical re-enactment aspect is why hunting gives a hunter a deeper appreciation of the past. For example, many hunters feel a kinship to and respect for American Indians. To many, hunting is "like entering a time capsule" and puts us "in touch with a life" we dream about or a time we "imagine to have been simpler and somehow more virtuous." It is a relationship with nature that is uniquely honest. It brings us in contact with the natural world in the most natural way. It has a sacredness to those that hunt that will never end. That relationship teaches us basic truths of life and death while almost everything else in life masks reality and how life works, not just where our food comes from. While those that have illusions about nature evade responsibility and even acknowledgment of the life and death process, hunters "take personal responsibility for the conservation use they make of nature." Witness the enormity of our conservation system. Those who kill and eat what they harvest know a sense of self-sufficiency and more truthful worldview than those who evade the truth and allude themselves about their consumption and responsibility. Hunters embrace and celebrate the eating of the game they have shot. Non-hunters never experience this. It is symbolic of self-sufficiency and self-reliance while it is "an expression of a particular sense of self. In my opinion, the closer we let our quarry get before we release the bolt/arrow, the more intense everything aforementioned becomes........Sorry for going so deep.
 

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Lineman said:
Ghostgoblin,

Hunting and our prey made us what we are today. We are wired to hunt. It helped define who and what we are. A study by Jan Dizard demonstrates three of the values of hunting in human terms. (1) It is a form of historical re-enactment; (2) it embodies an honest relationship between humans and nature; and (3) it keeps alive the ideal of self-reliance which ideal is argued by some scholars to be the only distinctive American contribution to political philosophy. The historical re-enactment aspect is why hunting gives a hunter a deeper appreciation of the past. For example, many hunters feel a kinship to and respect for American Indians. To many, hunting is "like entering a time capsule" and puts us "in touch with a life" we dream about or a time we "imagine to have been simpler and somehow more virtuous." It is a relationship with nature that is uniquely honest. It brings us in contact with the natural world in the most natural way. It has a sacredness to those that hunt that will never end. That relationship teaches us basic truths of life and death while almost everything else in life masks reality and how life works, not just where our food comes from. While those that have illusions about nature evade responsibility and even acknowledgment of the life and death process, hunters "take personal responsibility for the conservation use they make of nature." Witness the enormity of our conservation system. Those who kill and eat what they harvest know a sense of self-sufficiency and more truthful worldview than those who evade the truth and allude themselves about their consumption and responsibility. Hunters embrace and celebrate the eating of the game they have shot. Non-hunters never experience this. It is symbolic of self-sufficiency and self-reliance while it is "an expression of a particular sense of self. In my opinion, the closer we let our quarry get before we release the bolt/arrow, the more intense everything aforementioned becomes........Sorry for going so deep.
couldn't agree more
 

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short arrow shooter said:
I SHAKE UNTIL THE TIME OF TRUTH WHEN THE ARROW IS RELEASED THEN REALLY SHAKE SO I JUST SET DOWN
AND WAIT IT OUT[ AFTER WATCHING THE DEER RUN AND ERVERYTHING YOU DO ] WHEN I QUIT GETTING THAT FEELING FOR ME IT WILL BE TIME TO STOP HUNTING.
yeah I cant control myself, doesn't matter how much you practice you still are gonna shake, just gotta breathe like a marine lol, its intense , after my first hunt I was addicted
 

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Mine is simple, A sense of Peace and overwhelming Joy when the sun comes up and nature wakes up. Gods country and we are allowed to frolic in its wonders. Whether feathers or fur is harvested its all Epic and good eating. It has brought me closer to my sons and friends. Its not just the kill, its the peace and excitement you cant get in town.


Mark
 

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If I get a deer or not, just being in the woods watching all the creatures moving around that don't know your there, having a squirrel climb your tree then start climbing up your leg, and having to move to let him know you are there, or watching that buck fight, or a bunch of turkeys walking under your stand. Never get tired of the sights and sounds of the woods. And if that buck happens to walk by, well lets just expand the experience ten fold. Do I remember that roller coaster ride last wk that scared me as it came to the top, or that buck that came walking by my stand with steam flowing out of his nostrils on that cold morning !!!! enough said !!!
 

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You can never explain why you hunt to a non hunter or an anti as they just don't get it and probably never will. After you explain it, even with the best of your ability they are "like a pig looking at a wrist watch". Yet explain to another hunter that you spent all day in the snow and cold, just watching deer, but never even raising the bow to shoot, they understand with crystal clarity.

To us it's not a hobby, it's a way of life, our personality, our make up, our passion, and it reaches to our very core. It's certainly not the kill, as we are often just as satisfied by just being there, spending another day, doing what we care for most.

The nons and antis don't understand how we can shoot a deer while still having the deepest respect for them.

A few years ago with fishing clients on Lake Erie (they own a deer hunting lodge) we were in open water heading for one of my walleye hotspots to see a doe swimming, she is exhausted, confused, and struggling (the closest land in the direction she is heading is about 7 miles away), no question will drown. It takes 3 of us with ropes and nets over 3 hours to get her to the shore of the nearest island. They are hunting lodge owners and I'm a deer hunter.

Explain that to a non, they just don't get it, (you get the pig and wrist watch look) tell another hunter, they understand completely, as they would do the same.

As I get older, life gets shorter (and so does my patience for dealing the nons or antis) when they ask why----- I just say "cause that's what I do".

I know why but try to put it into words they will understand..................Good Luck, and have you watch handy.
 

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Thanks for a great synopsis, I think you've nailed it. As a younger hunter, even though I was taught different, to me, havesting a deer or shooting a limit of ducks was the goal. As I've "seasoned" a bit, there is far more to hunting, it is the whole package. I mean really, is there anything better than watching the woods come to life in the morning or watching the shift-change between God's daytime critters and nocturnal ones? I think not. Sharing stories around the camp, ribbing the greenhorns and listening to the re-telling of bygone days are what keeps our hunting tradition alive. Pay it forward!
 

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Great story and topic...good to see a non hunter get the questioned asked of why we hunt....its what our ancestors did and Native Indians have done for hundreds of years (survival).....its the thrill of the hunt...the outdoors, the beauty of our surroundings...."we" used to hunt to put food on the table, and to survive...it really hasn't changed much....(other than technology). Glad your buddy got to experience the thrill of the hunt and soon to be a xbow shooter. David
 
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My answer is because I like it!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
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