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Interesting...While I do lap my rifle scope rings, It never occurred to me to lap my XB scope rings. Hmmmm. Maybe that's because TP scopes come with the rings already attached to the scope, thus I just forget about it because I'm not actually taking the rings apart to put lay the scope in them. This is dumb on my part, being as I spent the $ for a pretty nice scope mounting kit with all the lapping tools in it. Well...if I experience any minor accuracy inconsistencies that I can't figure out, I will just take the rings apart and lap them to see if it helps at all.
 

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Interesting...While I do lap my rifle scope rings, It never occurred to me to lap my XB scope rings. Hmmmm. Maybe that's because TP scopes come with the rings already attached to the scope, thus I just forget about it because I'm not actually taking the rings apart to put lay the scope in them. This is dumb on my part, being as I spent the $ for a pretty nice scope mounting kit with all the lapping tools in it. Well...if I experience any minor accuracy inconsistencies that I can't figure out, I will just take the rings apart and lap them to see if it helps at all.

I figure it can't hurt as an option.. Cross bow shooters are always taling about what group they shot at x amount of range. I have had people who shoot long range rifle at 1,000 yrds+ tell me that everything done at that range with a rifle is what it takes to shoot 100-120yrds with a bow..I agree.. When I look at what they are doing and using I said it makes sense only to apply those methods to cross bow as well. I figure it can't hurt.. The lapping process I am just getting into, but I figure the benefit of the lapping being more solid fit for the scope not only for zero, but also hold has to be a benefit. Also with a better ring set of rings.. The rings I installed on the TECH-1 bow are Warne Tactical which is defienitly a step up from what most bows I see come with from factory..
 

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I'm with you Vital. It certainly can't hurt in most cases. I often wonder what rings are being supplied with the higher end XB scopes. Are they Warne, Simmons, Millett, Vortex, Weaver, or are they just cheap-o rings to maximize profits? I will pay closer attention when my Evo X Marksman shows up, just so I know. I suppose the one negative to lapping XB scopes would be for those people who have issues with the shock loosening up scope mounts and rings. If your scope is being shocked enough to start walking around inside the rings, I'd think the last thing you would want is to remove material from inside those rings. Personally, I'd buy different rings if I encounter that issue, but that's just me.
 

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I'm with you Vital. It certainly can't hurt in most cases. I often wonder what rings are being supplied with the higher end XB scopes. Are they Warne, Simmons, Millett, Vortex, Weaver, or are they just cheap-o rings to maximize profits? I will pay closer attention when my Evo X Marksman shows up, just so I know. I suppose the one negative to lapping XB scopes would be for those people who have issues with the shock loosening up scope mounts and rings. If your scope is being shocked enough to start walking around inside the rings, I'd think the last thing you would want is to remove material from inside those rings. Personally, I'd buy different rings if I encounter that issue, but that's just me.

Factory ring sets I've seen are price point. While some manfustures who have quality rings they also make price point.. A really good set of ring, maybe one of the best out there would be from NEAR Manufaturing in Canada.. I put a set on my S&B when they were inexpensive at $275 just for rings.. Now I think they are 1 piece and $375 .. Very well made, but the about the same cost or greater than most scope and ring combos we see on factory X bows..
 

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I'm with you Vital. It certainly can't hurt in most cases. I often wonder what rings are being supplied with the higher end XB scopes. Are they Warne, Simmons, Millett, Vortex, Weaver, or are they just cheap-o rings to maximize profits? I will pay closer attention when my Evo X Marksman shows up, just so I know. I suppose the one negative to lapping XB scopes would be for those people who have issues with the shock loosening up scope mounts and rings. If your scope is being shocked enough to start walking around inside the rings, I'd think the last thing you would want is to remove material from inside those rings. Personally, I'd buy different rings if I encounter that issue, but that's just me.
+1
 

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Really to hit a deer's vitals ? With wind and weather all part of the equation I'm not convinced it will make a huge difference but I guess it could be argued for some target shooter perfectionists.
 

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Really to hit a deer's vitals ? With wind and weather all part of the equation I'm not convinced it will make a huge difference but I guess it could be argued for some target shooter perfectionists.
Most of us already have to shoot separate dots to keep from busting arrows. I am not shooting deer at 100 yards anyway.
 

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Most of us already have to shoot separate dots to keep from busting arrows. I am not shooting deer at 100 yards anyway.

It's an option.. Most of us could probably get away with using iron sights, but the majority of cross bow shooters from what I see have scopes. I know have had bows come in to be worked on that appear to have been banged around a lot and maybe something like this may help a hunter like that..

There is an old saying,, " better to have it and not need it than to need it and not have it "
 

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Really to hit a deer's vitals ? With wind and weather all part of the equation I'm not convinced it will make a huge difference but I guess it could be argued for some target shooter perfectionists.


I'll agree with that.. Some people are ok with hitting paper plates at 30 yrds while others are trying to squeeze 1/8 inch at 100.. Me personally I think hunters should be more concerned about accuracy than target shooters, paper doesn't suffer.. ;)
 

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I'll agree with that.. Some people are ok with hitting paper plates at 30 yrds while others are trying to squeeze 1/8 inch at 100.. Me personally I think hunters should be more concerned about accuracy than target shooters, paper doesn't suffer.. ;)
Don't assume all hunters are satisfied with hitting paper plate size targets I and most ethical hunters are not. Lapping scope rings for mounting on a crossbow for 1/8" precision at a 100 yard target is debatable unless you can offer up some proof. We are talking crossbows not match rifle.
Whatever turns your crank or puts money in your bank. Show me the proof and how you measure it.
 

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Don't assume all hunters are satisfied with hitting paper plate size targets I and most ethical hunters are not. Lapping scope rings for mounting on a crossbow for 1/8" precision at a 100 yard target is debatable unless you can offer up some proof. We are talking crossbows not match rifle.
Whatever turns your crank or puts money in your bank. Show me the proof and how you measure it.

1. I never said "all hunters " when referring to paper plates. Please don't put words in my mouth that are not there.

As said.. " Some people are ok with hitting paper plates at 30 yrds "

2nd. I was making an general analogy between " some " hunters who are not as critical as others. Whether its 1/8, 1/2 inch or the right pair of socks that does the trick for the hunter.

3rd.. Whats your beef? Me being a Vendor coming here saying that I offer scope ring lapping seems to really twist you? If you don't like it, don't think it works than don't do it or have it done.
 

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No beef with you being a vendor. I just think that it would be redundant on a crossbow. Everyone is entitled to an opinion. I guess I struck a nerve with you because I questioned your post. The proof is in the pudding ;)
 

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No beef with you being a vendor. I just think that it would be redundant on a crossbow. Everyone is entitled to an opinion. I guess I struck a nerve with you because I questioned your post. The proof is in the pudding ;)

Only thing you struck a nerve was trying to put words in my mouth that I did not say and I have no tolerance for dishonesty. You lack integrity, "proof is in the pudding"..;)
 

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I'm afraid the dishonesty and lack of integrity lies with you my friend. You are selling a process to be used on crossbow scope rings that you claim will improve shooter accuracy but offer no proof. The proof is in the pudding. ;)
 

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I would think a $50 set of scope rings wouldn’t need lapping, but those $12 - $15 sets that come on the Chinese scopes should probably be lapped or thrown away.

I’m with Rit - unless I’m using one of my more expensive extended uni-mounts, I use the Burris Signature rings with the polymer inserts.
 
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I'm afraid the dishonesty and lack of integrity lies with you my friend. You are selling a process to be used on crossbow scope rings that you claim will improve shooter accuracy but offer no proof. The proof is in the pudding. ;)

You falsely tried to put words in my mouth and so far you don't even stand to correct yourself..You really can't even comprehend correctly what I say in front of you, but I'm going to give this one last whirl of effort.

411... The rings when first set on were about .002 out of alignment. After lapping as shown in video the gauge tips were dead on . This would mean at the least that there is better contact on the scope itself overtime with less chance of being tweaked which would accuracy..


Other source without Wal-Mart Mentality..

" Lapping—or truing up the inside surface of your scope rings—protects the outside of the scope tube from damage; eliminates stress on the tube that could affect the integrity of the scope's internal moving parts; and aids accuracy by removing any stresses that the scope tube could be applying to your rifle's action.
Unfortunately, few scope rings have perfectly machined surfaces where the ring contacts the scope tube. That's partly because perfectly true rings are expensive to manufacture, and your average weekend warrior isn't going to spend $130-plus on a premium set of scope rings.
Additionally, few rifle receivers are machined with absolutely true surfaces, and few of the scope-attachment screw holes where scope bases attach are drilled perfectly centered.
In short, when a ring with slightly imperfect inner surfaces is mounted to bases that are in turn screwed into slightly off-center holes in a slightly out-of-true action, it's a miracle if those inner ring surfaces turn out perfectly true." ( https://www.rifleshootermag.com/editorial/how-to-lap-scope-rings/83774 )

"Why Lap The Rings?

There are good reasons for a scope tube and rings to mate perfectly.

Magnified scopes almost always come tube shaped. That cylindrical shape is inherently strong — that’s why aquatic geniuses make submarines out of cylinders — but even still scope bodies can be damaged when you apply pressure while mounting the scope in the rings. Additionally, a poor mount that relies on uneven surface area contact can be unstable or off center.

After one carefully zeroes a scope, the last thing you want is movement during repeated recoil because the ring surface and scope tube don’t have firm contact with each other. When you boil it all down, jamming metal parts into alignment with each other isn’t a recipe for consistent and precise performance. It’s far better to take some extra time to make sure parts fit perfectly." (The How And Why Of Scope-Ring Lapping | Shooting Sports Retailer)


"The alignment bars in this kit provide for perfect alignment of both rings and will also diagnose any misalignment problem, vertical or horizontal, giving you the opportunity to fix the problem before damaging the scope or experiencing frustration at the range. The lapping bar is used to lap the rings to improve alignment, reduce stress on the scope and improve the grip of the rings on the scope. It also serves as a lever to rotate dovetail rings into place. Lapping the rings can also minimize or prevent ring marring of the scope. " (Wheeler)


Burris recommends lapping. Yes you can use Signature series rings and that will help since accoridng to Burris that will afford you 30% more contact,, but what if someone wants more..
"Can my scope be refinished and also not everyone uses Burris. Me personaly Burris never stood out to me as an upper end product.

"Unfortunately, no. Ring marks are usually the reason owners want to refinish scopes. To prevent ring marks, we recommend…
  • Using Signature Rings™
  • Following the torque specs of the rings
  • Lapping to prevent ring marks" ( Burris Optics )

So, let me ask you.. Since scope ring lapping can make for better surface contact ( FACT ) would that logically offer more reliability and consistency for the shooter when shooting overtime, Yes or no ?

You'll either prove my point for me or you're going to contradict several other sources and show that this conversation really doesn't need to go any further.
 

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My my you really have got your panties in a wad. I'm afraid that we agree to disagree. On a crossbow with a decent set of rings (Leupold for example) which are CNC machined and if they are .002" out of alignment as per your post. How much improvement will you gain by lapping them to zero then shooting at 100 yard target with a crossbow? I wish you the best on your endeavors and hope you get lots of customers for your scope ring lapping.
Have a good day (y)
 
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