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Gave my TRX300 to an up and coming bow hunter last night. After three shots wuold have to ice down wrist and elbow and take pain pills. Gonna miss it. Local D.C. said I'd qualify for a cross bow waiver. Say a prayer to help me get it. Been bow hunting twenty plus years. :help:
 

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Sorry to hear of your medical issue....You will find the crossbow to be a fine weapon & you will still need all your hunting skills! Good luck!
 

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Prayer sent.You will love. :db:
 

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enjoy the crossbow...

keep hunting too... dont let a little arm/shoulder issue get you down.

:)
 

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Hi creeker,
I know you gave your bow away and this information comes late to save that bow and your shooting, but I do have some great news for you. There's a device that I recently purchased because I was doing some reading and became interested in it. It's called the Hickory Creek Vertical In-Line Draw Lock.

I'm still not sure if we should classify it as a crossbow or a vertical bow accessory, because it's a hybrid. In any case you would draw your bow by placing your foot in the attached foot stirrup, in the same manner most crossbows are draw and loaded. Your string loop is attached to a trigger that is attached to a pistol grip style handle on the end of a light weight machined aluminum arm. The trigger is completely adjustable for any draw length bow you might be using. Once at full draw, you are not holding any poundage at all (0). The trigger contains an anti dryfire safety, so there's no risk of it going off until you use your finger to release the safety.

Because the draw length is always exactly the same and the shooter has no bow weight to contend with, torque is completely eliminated from the shooter. Form and accuracy is greatly improved and the accuracy is exceptional. I would typically shoot my Mathews Monster MR7 at about 70 lbs. @ 28". I simply changed my limbs to a set of 80 lb. limbs and switch the cam modules to a 29" draw. This would have never even been possible for me to draw or handle that much weight normally.

I can draw the bow back as easily with two hands as pulling a 40lb. bow and since I'm not holding at draw weight at full draw, I can shoot it all day with extreme accuracy.

BTW: - The bad news was it cost me a new set of arrows, since my normal Carbon Express Maxima Blue Streak Select Shafts couldn't handle the extra poundage.

You might consider looking into this unit if you'd like to be able to shoot a vertical bow for many more years with virtually no effort.

Regards,

Xbow755
 

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There is another adjustment with the Inline that I incorporated and its easy to do. With the vertical bows your anchor point on the side of your face is important, I had difficulty aligning my anchor point and I was inaccurate because of the issue that the pistol grip is in the Low Position straight down from the Bar and the trigger was there as well. The pistol grip and trigger can be moved, I moved both straight out from my face and it now feels like a release along the side and I 'm still using my anchor point, voila, accuracy and repetetive anchor was back. This system is totally adjustable to fit your needs, be carefull don't cut the Bar until you've established a proper draw length as it may change based on the type of Bow you're using ,some have two arrow rest mounting holes , some only one also some Bows have a more reflexed riser than others so check it out with the full length bar attached and after you're sure of the length required, cut it at that time. It saved my archery season even with painfull shoulder problems and I shoot it with a 70 lb Bow with no loss of speed, in fact I gained I always shot a 60 lb Bow and as long as I was accurate I harvested animals, so yes a 60 lb Bow would be like pulling 30 Lbs by two hands. The nices part is you can hold the Bow on target longer and you can even use a Bipod or Monopod on the foot stirrup just keep it out of line of the bottom Limb, I use the TenPoint Steddy Eddy quick relese system it works awesome. Cactus
 

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Hi Cactus,
Thank you so much for sharing these valuable tips on set up and usage. They'll come in handy, no doubt.

Two other things; when you have time, go back and take a look at the thread about Long Range Shooting in the General Forum. I always believe in giving credit where credit is due. It's sort of my way of saying thank you!

Next, I was also going to add to your points above by saying that due to my long background as a competitive shooter in archery, I have a strong preference for very light triggers with absolutely "No Creep". When shooting my compound bow for target or hunting I use a release that's made by Carter Enterprises. It's called the "Like Mike". What's unique about these releases is that they break like glass and can be set for as lite as a 1/2 lb., which is fairly standard when using back tension to perform ones release. back tension shooting must be practiced and learned over several months, so it's not something that people can just pick up and gain control of in a few weeks.

That said, I don't advocate people running out and changing their triggers or releases to these ultra light weights. The reason i was bringing this information to light is because I also learned that the trigger on the Hickory Creek Vertical In-Line Crossbows can be adjusted to a very light operation. Since they are a roller style trigger, this makes them very smooth, but if your a little handy, it's also very easy to get a machine shop to produce a smaller sized roller. Actually, three or four smaller rollers in different sizes. You can play with these to see which one you like the best in the trigger. Essentially, reducing the roller size, lightens the trigger pull and reduces the travel, so it's just a matter of finding the one that appeals most to you. This could probably also be accomplished on a regular bench grinder, but I'm not good enough using a grinder to get the roller nice and smooth, so the machine shop is a better alternative in my case.

My Timney Trigger on my crossbow is a 3 lb. single stage break and it's nice to shoot. I'm working on a 1.5 lb. release on the Hickory Creek trigger. I honestly think most people would find the stock release on the Hickory Creel In-Line Crossbow a pleasure to shoot, but just in case their a little be lighter nature d, as like me, they can easily modify it to their liking.

Regards,

Xbow755
 

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Hope your pains go away. You gonna fall in love with crossbows. :)
 

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XBow755: Thank you for the complements but more importantly for the information on the triggers, I think Jerry at HC would probably appreciate your research and may include different roller sizes in his packages. Like you I'm not able to produce a good even roller and the machine shops around here are all dedicated to working for the Oil & Gas Industry and will not do anything like this. I appreciate that we as members can approach a subject from different POV, but have and will always maintain the safety aspect. I find nothing wrong with disagreement and have repetitively told my friends and customers that there is no such thing as a stupid question. It is through the system of discussion that we learn and I've learned a miramid of things from your posts. The HC inline system allows our new guys to transit to crossbows without costing an arm and leg, most are at an age were due to that issue heavy weights are no longer doable by them. As for myself I'll admit I'm a stubborn type ( My Dutch Heritage showing up LOL) and continue to use a Vertical Bow at 40 Lbs , an Inline at 70 Lbs, , my Mission MXB 320 and finally when the minus 20 to 30 hits and I haven't been successfull to at least take a whitetail I will still use my rifle, I enjoy all facets and can't understand the squabble about our favourite the Crossbow. There is enough room for all of us and really the Fish and Game departments decide the limits available does it really matter what is used? I think not as long as it is done safely and humanely. I came to Hunting as a 25 year old and learned that my safety was important but that the safety of those around me is equally important in some cases even more so. The inline is a very Safe system. however, remember to use the best and strongest D Loop material available, I've had D Loops break on release and now automatically change mine out every 50 shots , the material is inexpensive the D Loop tie in is very easy , if you can tie loops you can tie a D Loop. In Tying mine I leave enough material so that once I've stretched the D Loop I put an overhand Knot at each end of the outside of the Loop Knots and melt the ends thus ensuring that under the pressure of full draw there is no way that the loop knots can slip or pull loose. I guess self preservation makes me cautious. In the end the Vertical Bow is were we all started and the present day Bows are phenominal but once injury, age or loss of strength forces you to reduce the draw weights to such a low weight that neither the Bow nor your ability is viable the Hickory Creek Inline is a very good resolution, to illustrate it's use I've used it for spot and stalking Mule Deer on the southern Alberta prairie, the nice part about old age is that you're no longer able to make fast quick movements which often ruined a stalk, so you see there is a positive in getting older, So whether you're impatient or not old guys are better at spot and stalk due to being forced to be patient and carefull. In the end if you love your Vertical Bow and are forced to hang it up the Hickory Creek Inline is the answer and the owner Jerry is the most honest and helpfull individual you'll meet bar none. Thanks for listening. Cactus
 

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Hi Cactus,
You and I very rarely disagree on most points and this one is no different. As always, airing to the side of safety is most important and should always come first.

As some of us are aware, machine shop costs these days are both expensive and as you correctly stated, they don't like small one or two piece jobs. It takes the same amount of work to program their machines to produce two pieces as it does to produce 2,000 pieces.

My suggestion regarding the roller size change is only for those who have the experience to be able to do it safely and the right way, otherwise it's not meant for beginners or intermediates. This is still a weapon and when loaded, it's as dangerous as anything else can possibly be.

For myself, I've been involved for years with customizing many of my own weapons, but there's a price to pay in order to do this correctly. It's much like shooting itself in the respect that it takes precision work to insure good results. Many times this is not achieved on just a single try, so one must be prepared to test safely and go back to the drawing boards as many times as necessary until you achieve exactly what you were aiming for to begin with.

Regards,

Xbow755
 

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Hi Cactus,
Thank you so much for sharing these valuable tips on set up and usage. They'll come in handy, no doubt.

Two other things; when you have time, go back and take a look at the thread about Long Range Shooting in the General Forum. I always believe in giving credit where credit is due. It's sort of my way of saying thank you!

Next, I was also going to add to your points above by saying that due to my long background as a competitive shooter in archery, I have a strong preference for very light triggers with absolutely "No Creep". When shooting my compound bow for target or hunting I use a release that's made by Carter Enterprises. It's called the "Like Mike". What's unique about these releases is that they break like glass and can be set for as lite as a 1/2 lb., which is fairly standard when using back tension to perform ones release. back tension shooting must be practiced and learned over several months, so it's not something that people can just pick up and gain control of in a few weeks.

That said, I don't advocate people running out and changing their triggers or releases to these ultra light weights. The reason i was bringing this information to light is because I also learned that the trigger on the Hickory Creek Vertical In-Line Crossbows can be adjusted to a very light operation. Since they are a roller style trigger, this makes them very smooth, but if your a little handy, it's also very easy to get a machine shop to produce a smaller sized roller. Actually, three or four smaller rollers in different sizes. You can play with these to see which one you like the best in the trigger. Essentially, reducing the roller size, lightens the trigger pull and reduces the travel, so it's just a matter of finding the one that appeals most to you. This could probably also be accomplished on a regular bench grinder, but I'm not good enough using a grinder to get the roller nice and smooth, so the machine shop is a better alternative in my case.

My Timney Trigger on my crossbow is a 3 lb. single stage break and it's nice to shoot. I'm working on a 1.5 lb. release on the Hickory Creek trigger. I honestly think most people would find the stock release on the Hickory Creel In-Line Crossbow a pleasure to shoot, but just in case their a little be lighter nature d, as like me, they can easily modify it to their liking.

Regards,

Xbow755
I too love a super light trigger my crossbow is set at 2 pounds with 0 creep really really nice break on it my back ground is in competition trap shooting super light triggers help a ton but they are not for everyone you must be super focused on your target and trigger or the trees will have arrows stick in them :lol:

Sent from my C771 using Tapatalk 2
 

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Hi jdcenturypro,

Just wanted to comment about the point made above regarding light triggers, it's absolutely true and definitely not for everyone. It becomes much more useful once shooters progress beyond a intermediate level of shooting and are very comfortable with their equipment and shooting routines.

That said, when I read your comment I couldn't help by laugh out loud because we both It's very easy to vividly picture the scenario taking place in your head, so we know just how true this can be when shooters have a quick or heavy trigger finger.

Regards,

Xbow755
 

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Good luck on your transition to the crossbow. I'm going to be in the same situation in the near future. I've been shooting a compound for 30 years and have to limit my practice time or my shoulders bother me. Getting old isn't fun!
 

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WyoHunter said:
Good luck on your transition to the crossbow. I'm going to be in the same situation in the near future. I've been shooting a compound for 30 years and have to limit my practice time or my shoulders bother me. Getting old isn't fun!
"Getting old isn't fun! " , Better than the alternative !!
 

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Can't shoot vertical bow anymore - been there, done that. I turned 65 a few days ago. The first crossbow I bought was a Barnett C5 Wildcat, and I never had a lick of trouble from it. Then, for no good reason, other the desire, I bought a Scorpyd 160 Orion Extreme - now that is a CROSSBOW! With my C5 I thought I was doing good to consistently hit a paper plate at 30-40 yards. With the Orion I can't even shoot two arrows at the same point at 30-40 yards, because it is very likely I'll hit the first arrow with the second - I learned that lesson the hard way. Scorpyd crossbows are real expensive, but I guess you get what you pay for with a Scorpyd.

I'm broke, but I'm happy. Who ever says money can't buy happiness, never met a Scorpyd.

Bobby
 
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