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I had to run a spike and two does off this evening before I could come off stand. They were all within 20 yards feeding in my foodplot. I waited until dark and shined my white light headlight behind me away from the deer into the woods and they just moved off without being alarmed. Ive found it to be much easier on the deer after dark. Like robertb….Ive walked right past deer bedded down when walking into rifle stands when using my green headlight.
 
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Really no longer an option for me. Only 5-6 years ago I could walk 1/2-3/4 mile into the woods, find the stand, and get all set up without any light. Now I use the light and an embarrassing number of bright eyes so I don’t miss and walk by the stand. I did that just last year and messed up that spot for the rest of the season. :oops: I use a red light, as my choices are red or white. The day I shot my best crossbow buck, I “stared down” a couple of doe on the way in with the red light. They did trot off, but with minimal snorting and it didn’t affect my hunt.
 

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Always try to cause the least amount of disturbance possible when heading to or from a stand or blind. That said I regularly use a headlamp to navigate those clumsier and obstacle-filled parts of the trail - on those moonless nights it‘s not worth the risk of breaking my neck in a tangle of roots. But I use the light only when needed and on either red/green or the lightest white light setting that I need to see the trail. Always amazed when I see a 400+ lumen beam off in the distance lighting up the whole forest, sometimes accompanied by the sound of crashing through brush, or worse yet - voices.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Always try to cause the least amount of disturbance possible when heading to or from a stand or blind. That said I regularly use a headlamp to navigate those clumsier and obstacle-filled parts of the trail - on those moonless nights it‘s not worth the risk of breaking my neck in a tangle of roots. But I use the light only when needed and on either red/green or the lightest white light setting that I need to see the trail. Always amazed when I see a 400+ lumen beam off in the distance lighting up the whole forest, sometimes accompanied by the sound of crashing through brush, or worse yet - voices.
I'm going to have to change the white bulb to one that's red. If I can, I don't use any light except that from the moon. I have a wide ATV trail I follow to one stand that helps minimize light and noise, though there are plenty of dead leaves and sometimes snow that makes it impossible to not make some noise.
 

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It is near impossible not to make noise when heading to a stand in the dark unless you have raked a path to it. I have learned to move slowly watching where my feet go and if I crack a branch I stop for a few seconds like a deer would. If in heavy leaves I will take 2 or 3 steps and then pause before taking a few more. Try to sound more like an animal instead of a human.
 
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