Crossbow Nation banner

1 - 20 of 30 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
232 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
What the heck is happening? I’ve sighted in my new Barnett TS380 at 25 yards and On the range it‘s an absolute tack driver, even at 35 yards i have to use a different spot on the target to prevent destroying bolts.
Last Sunday evening, While in my stand which is 17 feet height. I had a big doe broadside at 18 yards. Since I am sighted in and dead on at 25, I figured I’d aim a little lower so I put the crosshair on the lower horizontal 3rd of the deer about 2 inches behind the shoulder and squeezed the trigger. I found my arrow buried in the ground thinly covered in blood and what felt like fat. It was very greasy feeling. Not your typical dark sticky blood. i barely found a drop of blood on the trail I saw her run off on. I had her on video and was able to see that i hit very low. Just barely grazed her underside which would explain the fat/greasy feeling bolt. Did not recover the deer or find more than one drop of blood.
The next day I shot at the target with Broadhead and it is still dead on. So I figured it must have been me and I must have pulled on the shot.
Tonight, I had another doe in the exact same spot (bait pile) and the same thing happened. What the heck is happening or am I doing something wrong?
Do i need to hold higher when at a steep angle and close target?
Before I shoot at any other deer, I plan on taking a target to my stand and placing it at the exact location where both deer stood and see where I’m hitting.
In the mean time, Any advice, thoughts or ideas would be much appreciated.
Anthony
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
72 Posts
It is because vertical distance from an elevated stand shows up has more yardage than actual ground level. If she was at 18 yards using a rangefinder from the tree she could have actually been 15 yards from ground level. Anything from an elevated stand is always going to be more than from the ground due to angles. But all actuality you need to shoot what the ground level distance is

Sent from my moto z4 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,392 Posts
You’re dealing with an angle issue. My suggestion is to re-sight your crossbow in from as close to the same height as when you’re hunting from your stand. The closer your target the steeper you’re angle becomes. Once the target is about 25 to 30 yards out the angle is minimal unless your height is greater. There are devices that attach to your scope called Angle Cosine Compensators. They show you the precise amount of compensation at any height or distance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
72 Posts
I used to just use a regular rangefinder which works great for my slug gun, I used it for my bow also but got tired of trying to do the math on angles. I hunt public land so I never know which tree I will be in so I can't know all the ground level yardage to everything. Plus I like to hunt high minimum 20 like to get up to 25 though. And with those angles it is really hard to get it right so I bit the bullet and bought one and I am so glad I did. Took both rangefinders out hunting and ranged different targets. The difference in the 2 would have cost me a deer for sure. They are really not more expensive than a regular rangefinder either

Sent from my moto z4 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
232 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Thank you all
 
  • Like
Reactions: dynamo61

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,086 Posts
In the mean time, Any advice, thoughts or ideas would be much appreciated.
Hi Anthony... Ready for a little analytic geometry with a little physics thrown in for fun? When you sight-in on level ground, you have a straight line of sight (LOS) from your eye to the bullseye, but your rail is 2-3" below your LOS so it must be tilted up so the arrow and LOS intersect at the target. In addition to making up for the LOS issue, your arrow is accelerating toward the ground at 32 feet/second^2 from the time it leaves the rail. When you put in vertical clicks on your scope you are tilting your LOS down so you tilt your bow up to correct for the arrow drop. At a range of 75 feet the arrow flies an arc that intersects the LOS TWICE; once close to the bow and finally at the bullseye. The peak of the arc with a fast bow may be only fractions of an inch above LOS, but it will occur close to the mid-point of the flight. Therefore, if you sighted in for 75 feet and moved the target in to 45 feet, the arrow should strike high (near the top of its arc). That's the logical answer. What went wrong twice will take some more thought. Loose scope, nock not well seated, ???. Sighting in from 17' sound like a great idea. Please keep us posted.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
72 Posts
Hi Anthony... Ready for a little analytic geometry with a little physics thrown in for fun? When you sight-in on level ground, you have a straight line of sight (LOS) from your eye to the bullseye, but your rail is 2-3" below your LOS so it must be tilted up so the arrow and LOS intersect at the target. In addition to making up for the LOS issue, your arrow is accelerating toward the ground at 32 feet/second^2 from the time it leaves the rail. When you put in vertical clicks on your scope you are tilting your LOS down so you tilt your bow up to correct for the arrow drop. At a range of 75 feet the arrow flies an arc that intersects the LOS TWICE; once close to the bow and finally at the bullseye. The peak of the arc with a fast bow may be only fractions of an inch above LOS, but it will occur close to the mid-point of the flight. Therefore, if you sighted in for 75 feet and moved the target in to 45 feet, the arrow should strike high (near the top of its arc). That's the logical answer. What went wrong twice will take some more thought. Loose scope, nock not well seated, ???. Sighting in from 17' sound like a great idea. Please keep us posted.
This is what I was trying to explain in layman's terms. That's why I just pasted the article. Hillbilly math for me lol.

Sent from my moto z4 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
446 Posts
Shooting supported or freestanding ?
If the latter is the case, the unfamiliar posture could be the case.
That is why vertical bow archers bend their hip, instead of regulating angle with the arms. That affects other muscles, and often blasts the shot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
232 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Hi Anthony... Ready for a little analytic geometry with a little physics thrown in for fun? When you sight-in on level ground, you have a straight line of sight (LOS) from your eye to the bullseye, but your rail is 2-3" below your LOS so it must be tilted up so the arrow and LOS intersect at the target. In addition to making up for the LOS issue, your arrow is accelerating toward the ground at 32 feet/second^2 from the time it leaves the rail. When you put in vertical clicks on your scope you are tilting your LOS down so you tilt your bow up to correct for the arrow drop. At a range of 75 feet the arrow flies an arc that intersects the LOS TWICE; once close to the bow and finally at the bullseye. The peak of the arc with a fast bow may be only fractions of an inch above LOS, but it will occur close to the mid-point of the flight. Therefore, if you sighted in for 75 feet and moved the target in to 45 feet, the arrow should strike high (near the top of its arc). That's the logical answer. What went wrong twice will take some more thought. Loose scope, nock not well seated, ???. Sighting in from 17' sound like a great idea. Please keep us posted.
Thank you for the explanation. I will get out to my stand with a target this afternoon.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
232 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Shooting supported or freestanding ?
If the latter is the case, the unfamiliar posture could be the case.
That is why vertical bow archers bend their hip, instead of regulating angle with the arms. That affects other muscles, and often blasts the shot.
Sitting with my elbow resting on my knee. I've made this shot around 10 other times in the past with my Quad 400. The new bow groups better, is much lighter and faster. I plan on sighting from my stand this afternoon. We'll see
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,392 Posts
I have been archery hunting over 50 years from stands 15' to 35' in height but have settled pretty much on 25' now to avoid single lung hits. I range my deer and shoot for the distance shown and always hit where I aim. If you will simply practice from the height you are going to hunt from you would know where your arrows are going to hit. Next deer just aim midway up the body about an inch behind the shoulder and shoot when broadside. Then climb down and go gut your double lung shot deer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
143 Posts
I really don't notice much a difference when being elevated...I shoot my bow every weekend I go to the lake in the summer and my father in laws porch is 20ft off the ground and at 20 yards I see hardly any change at all. At 30 yards I aim slightly lower but not much at all.

Regardless, as others have mentioned you need to practice how you hunt, if you notice you're hitting high at 18feet when practicing then you'll know exactly how low to aim. Easy fix is just to buy an elevation range finder.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,822 Posts
My stand is 15 ft but I hunt in a hilly area . stand is on side of hill. Some shots are still uphill some level and some extremely downhill. TOTR sent me a range finder that calculates angles. First time using one. Expecting it to make my shot decisions much easier.
 
1 - 20 of 30 Posts
Top