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I don’t have a crossbow with hooks anymore but I always used them hooks down - and never had an issue with them riding up onto the rail.

Two reasons:

#1 - I keep the rope a bit short and would set it in the cocking groove and then reach the hooks forward onto the string. Easy to do with hooks down, nearly impossible to do with hooks up.

#2 - There’s a tendency to lift the handles when cocking. With hooks down the opening rotates more over the string. With hooks up the opening rotates towards the string.

So cocking rope - hooks down, cable hooks on my Deathstalker - hooks up. 🤣
 
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Pretty soon it won't matter. All bows will need a mechanical draw.
 

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Another thing.

With hooks down and pulling upward on the handles, the hooks rotate towards a thicker portion of material pulling against the string.

With hooks up, they’ll rotate to a thinner section (aka - weaker) of the hook allowing it easier to break.

If you’re going to use hooks up I’d suggest wearing a face shield. Good luck.
 

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In regard to crossbow hooks they can be assembled differently or
manufactured differently. Here are some pictures.
Peripheral Gas Cable Headphones Electrical wiring

The first picture shows hooks from two crank cocking devices.
Both sets of hooks have the pulley axles riveted. One with the dome
of the rivet on top while the other is on the bottom. One was manufactured
to install the hooks facing down while the other was manufactured to
install the hooks facing up.
One can remove the cocking string on one end of the crank spool and
switch the hooks to face the opposite direction if they wish. With this
device, one does not want to cross the cables.
Wood Gas Cable Wire Metal


The second picture shows that the downward side of the hook in the pulley
area is much wider than the upper side. This style hook will only work one
way (hooks up) and still jams up when nearing the cocked position on the
Barnett Ghost 410 crossbow as it wants to twist the hook.

I modified the stock on my Barnett Ghost 410 crossbows to use the crank
cocking device to plug into the rear of the stock as it pulls more straight
back as compared to the sloppy fitting device Barnett mounts lower in the
stock that pulls more downward on the bow string. I could not use the hooks
and had to install Barnett's hook sled device.
The reason being, if one looks near the trigger box, the stock section widens
out causing the hooks to widen out at the pulley area and jam against the wider
stock before the bow string is fully cocked.

All my Taiwan manufactured crossbows: Carbon Express 390 Pile Driver,
the rebranded Rocky Mountain 405, 415, Bruin Ambush 370 and a recently
acquired Center Point Sniper XT390 do not have this problem as they maintain
the rail clearance past where the bow string cocks.

All my crossbows will use the crank cocking device that plugs into the butt of the
stock
My advice for cocking and shooting a crossbow is to wear safety glasses. Even
if one wears prescription glasses with by focals, one can have the prescription
glasses built as safety glasses with the by focal line moved to the center. When
mine were built the optometrist did not realize I was a welder so the focal area was
set lower for reading purposes. I took mine back and had the lower section reground.

Wishing you all the best .
Take care.
 

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The second picture shows that the downward side of the hook in the pulley
area is much wider than the upper side. This style hook will only work one
way (hooks up)
and still jams up when nearing the cocked position on the
Barnett Ghost 410 crossbow as it wants to twist the hook.
If you’re going to remove the rope, couldn’t you turn the hooks down, switch sides (left to right, right to left), rethread the rope and have the hooks down with the wider section like you described?
 

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If you’re going to remove the rope, couldn’t you turn the hooks down, switch sides (left to right, right to left), rethread the rope and have the hooks down with the wider section like you described?
Thanks for the suggestion.
Even if one changed the hooks to face down, the downward side as showing the picture
has that bump out section on both sides, not just the one. It is just a poorly designed system.
With the various brands and series of brand crossbows that I have worked on, I have only
come across one with this cocking rope design. I have tried hooks a few times, but sighting
in the crossbows, they are all sighted in using the high quality rifle jig and what crossbows
that were not built to use the plug in crank cocking device, I have modified them to use it.
With the crank system, I do not have to remove the crossbow, cock it and then re align it in
the jig like I would if using the rope cocker. Even though a crank cocking device is slower,
it is much more accurate in regards to centering the bowstring serving in the arrow latch area.

This is also another reason why I can shoot up to 100 and some times well over that number
day after day as compared to what one could using the rope cocker.

Here is one of the crank cocking devices I use. As shown this device, the hooks would face up.
I just removed one end of the string and switched them to face down. With care I can also decock
my crossbows with this system if I wish to. Changing a bow string or adding or removing twists is
very simple as I partially cock the crossbow, block the cams, then back off a bit with the crank. The
crossbow remains in the jig all the time.

Another thing to pay attention to on the crossbows is how close the finger guards are mounted to
the top of the rail-stock.


Auto part Rim Machine Metal Automotive exterior

One does not want to cross the cocking string when using this system. I have a newer
version of this device that at the shaft end is an allen screw that can be adjusted to put
pressure on a spring loaded ball that fits in a groove in the drum shaft. Using this system,
there is no way the crank can come off unless it is physically removed. It has the orange
handle and matching orange hooks. As with the one in this picture, the handle can be used
on either side.

Wishing you all the best.
Take care.
 

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Jop Polaris a Is there a member currently making Amsteel?
Don’t know about a member here. I usually google and buy. I may have bought from a member of this or CT forum. Too long to remember, at least 4 years ;)

I have long preferred hooks up (so I can see the string in the hooks), but either or works fine, unless you want to have another endless debate on crossbow minutiae. Very sorry about your eye, Jim. I can understand why this subject has particular importance to you.
 

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I can’t understand how some say hooks up would rotate the hook to a weaker point of not pulled straight. Isn’t the hook just rotating around an axis ? (String). Seems it would rotate to the same position either way.
 

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I think peple should be free to use them whichever way they want.

I don’t have any crossbows anymore that use hooks - the R10 uses a crank, my DS uses a sled.

I do recall these Red Hot EZ rollers that were the worse hooks I ever tried, and the video seems to show them hooks down. But if people want to use hooks up that’s fine as well.

I had a Mission Dagger and the Sub-1 XR and used the RSD cocker on both. With the RSD mounted under the barrel, it pulled from a downward angle which probably kept the hooks jumping onto the rail with them down.

My only other crossbow was the Barnett Recruit and I have no idea which way I put the hooks on.

 
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Got a buddy that uses the red hot He said they are designed to use down because of the roller design.
 

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Got a buddy that uses the red hot He said they are designed to use down because of the roller design.
From the looks of the video that tpcollins posted your buddy is correct. Turning them up would put the side rollers above the rail bed.
 

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I think peple should be free to use them whichever way they want.

I don’t have any crossbows anymore that use hooks - the R10 uses a crank, my DS uses a sled.

I do recall these Red Hot EZ rollers that were the worse hooks I ever tried, and the video seems to show them hooks down. But if people want to use hooks up that’s fine as well.

I had a Mission Dagger and the Sub-1 XR and used the RSD cocker on both. With the RSD mounted under the barrel, it pulled from a downward angle which probably kept the hooks jumping onto the rail with them down.

My only other crossbow was the Barnett Recruit and I have no idea which way I put the hooks on.

The Mission crossbows are quite easy to cock & decock with a rope, and Mission recommends hooks up for their crossbows.

I think the video that started this thread makes a valid point about hooks being up, but not every crossbow is designed the same. Commonsense should also prevail.

I've read where some guys feel hooks up is safer. If a hook breaks, the broken hook is more inclined to shoot down. Then I have heard others who say the opposite of that.

I prefer up, because I can visually see the string firmly seated in the hooks, and I feel I can see what I doing better when carefully removing them. Many crossbows go to safety with cocking, but I would never rely on that without checking. Some like Excalibur need to be manually cocked after cocking, too.

The last thing I want is another mandate. So I vote against a hooks up or a hooks down mandate. We live in a free society, and I want to do whatever I feel is best for my situation. This doesn't have to an issue where some are right, or some are wrong. Just be safe, & enjoy your crossbow!
 

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Up or down, no matter to me as long as they're forged aluminum so they don't break.
 
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