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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
following the advice of fly I made this short video on xbow latches polish that I think someone may find interesting. anyone can do it as you only need some fine sandpaper and masking tape. the first goal is to reduce the string worn-out but it will also increase accuracy and consistency of the xbow:

 

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i used electric tape, and it didnt leave markings and i used it a lot, coverer pretty much evereything there, cos i was worried about the dust

had barrel facing me all times and only polished back sides of latches

also used wet paper to clean up and dry after, you really want to be sure its all well cleaned
 

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Great post and highly underrated what you shared. Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I'm glad you like it! when fly told me to do it I immeditely understood that it was a valuable advice and I would not even think about it.
 

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If it were me;
If the latches pivot from the bottom, I would put tape on the upper part of the string slot and orient the bow upside down to reduce the possibility of any grit falling into the mechanism and at no time would I move the bow around and have the bow right side up and I would always point down so that debris would fall way from the trigger mechanism.
Put the tape on very loosely as to not attach it to the bow, then close the latches on the tape and then firm the contact of the tape.
I like to use a paint brush to get debris out and then take off the tape.
Keep in mind that without removing the latch and using a jeweler's loupe or an electronic microscope, it is trial and error so you may have to do it more than once depending on how bad the latch is and how much it you remove. Do not remove too much and do not use a Dremel (even a polishing wheel) because if you do, you may go through the case hardening of the latch. Polishing latches works well but when you do so, you are taking risks. If you aren't 150% competetent or sure about what you're doing, don't do it. You could easily create an unsafe condition.
 

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I just remove mine to do them. Don’t have to worry about getting grit in the trigger box that way.
Not only that but it is the only way to know if you get the imperfections out because you can get a good look at the surface with a jeweler's loupe or electronic microscope that I prefer using. You should strive for an absolutely perfect surface. Having the latch out you can control the abrasive paper angle better so that you do not reduce the contact area so don't point the paper away from the latch but out to the sides.
 
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So, I have not polished latches before, but I do think I have a latch that is a little rough. Picture attached. I have a Shadow NXT with approximately 300 shots on the current serving. When I last changed the serving it had the same spot starting to come apart as in the current serving picture.

From other posts here, there are some risks involved if I polish the latches. I have pads from 3,000 to 10,000 grit.

I am pretty close to trying this out. If I have it upside down, taped and start with 5,000 grit and end with 10,000 and take it easy on how long I use each, how do I know if I have done enough? Do I just shoot afterwards and see if it gets worse.I don’t have a microscope and I don’t really want to take out the trigger box.

Or, am I better off just changing the serving every 300 or so shots so I don’t cause damage?300 shots will last me a couple years but it just bugs me to not correct.

thanks



718EB334-10CB-4016-91CD-244C87B3EF9A.jpeg
 

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So, I have not polished latches before, but I do think I have a latch that is a little rough. Picture attached. I have a Shadow NXT with approximately 300 shots on the current serving. When I last changed the serving it had the same spot starting to come apart as in the current serving picture.

From other posts here, there are some risks involved if I polish the latches. I have pads from 3,000 to 10,000 grit.

I am pretty close to trying this out. If I have it upside down, taped and start with 5,000 grit and end with 10,000 and take it easy on how long I use each, how do I know if I have done enough? Do I just shoot afterwards and see if it gets worse.I don’t have a microscope and I don’t really want to take out the trigger box.

Or, am I better off just changing the serving every 300 or so shots so I don’t cause damage?300 shots will last me a couple years but it just bugs me to not correct.

thanks
Which way your better off depends on your skill set and willingness to think about what you're doing to do it right. Personally, I'm with you, I want it right.

I would only use abrasive strips. Anything else could cause an uneven surface and because of the unevenness could cause going through the case hardening.
Because you can't see the latch surface up close it is a trial and error process. Polish it, shoot it and if it isn't good enough do it again.
 
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