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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
....what can expect from fixed two-blade BHs?

The arrows are Koda’s 338 Magnums and fly at 300fps of so.
 

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Blade width has the most to do with it on the whole but not a rule of thumb.
Best fixed blades (I have found in hundreds tested) were the magus stinger 85 grain, the wasp boss bullet 100 grain and the shuttle T lock 100 grain, Barrie rocky mountain blitz (re-introduced as the muzzy trocar) 100 grain and the NAP Nightmare 100 grain. Since back then, I have seen a hand full that are as good as the ones listed but for overall, these are the best I have seen.
And yes.. Hundreds. 5 years at over 50 a year in testing.
 

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You have other issues. All of those heads mentioned above should have no problems flying.
I have long been shooting big 150 grain Rothhar Snuffers at 304 Fps from a Parker Hornet Extreme, with no issues.
I hope you are not chasing that same zero with field points and broadheads . Just re-zero with good heads and move on. Go put that time in the woods instead of fiddling with equipment.

The problem exists when you cannot group with broadheads.
I would not attempt an actual group anyhow. But one broadhead tipped arrow on target, go pull it, repeat, go pull it, should all hit intended zero.
 

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And i wouldn't shoot Stingers. I did that a number of years. From vertical bow and xbow. I broke quite a few ferrules on bone, plus they are a pain to sharpen. If you have bleeders, you must remove the screw and main blade to get the correct sharpening angle, because the bleeders are in the way of the sharpening stone.

And touching up to get that biting edge is required with any blade.
 

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Montecs shouldn’t be too difficult to get shooting well, especially at 300 FPS. Check the spin on them. I’ve seen others say they sometimes don’t spin well. Mine always have. The Koda 338s are Gold Tips. Not sure if they are Ballistics or Swift’s. Ballistics would be better. As far as another head flying better? Maybe Ramcats or a small two blade. I agree, at 300 FPS, I don’t see the broadhead as being difficult to get shooting well. What direction (from field points) are the heads shooting? How much does the group open up?
 

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You have other issues. All of those heads mentioned above should have no problems flying.
I have long been shooting big 150 grain Rothhar Snuffers at 304 Fps from a Parker Hornet Extreme, with no issues.
I hope you are not chasing that same zero with field points and broadheads . Just re-zero with good heads and move on. Go put that time in the woods instead of fiddling with equipment.

The problem exists when you cannot group with broadheads.
I would not attempt an actual group anyhow. But one broadhead tipped arrow on target, go pull it, repeat, go pull it, should all hit intended zero.
I could not disagree more. While there are few that have field point accuracy, there are some (that I listed) that do. If the head does not fly to point of aim (found with the field point) then it's not aerodynamic.
Adjusting the scope is the poor mans/lazy mans way of going about it.

Adjusting the scope is just hoping everything works out...which it wont, from head to head.
They dont perfectly screw up 3 heads in a row every time, on the assembly line or at the drafting table.
It's either good at your speed or it is not, provided the bows tune is in order.
 

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....what can expect from fixed two-blade BHs?

The arrows are Koda’s 338 Magnums and fly at 300fps of so.
The less blades the better in general. That said..
I have seen perfectly awful 2 blade heads compared to great 3&4 blade heads.
It is the head and not the number of blades that determines the end result.
 

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I could not disagree more. While there are few that have field point accuracy, there are some (that I listed) that do. If the head does not fly to point of aim (found with the field point) then it's not aerodynamic.
Adjusting the scope is the poor mans/lazy mans way of going about it.

Adjusting the scope is just hoping everything works out...which it wont, from head to head.
They dont perfectly screw up 3 heads in a row every time, on the assembly line or at the drafting table.
It's either good at your speed or it is not, provided the bows tune is in order.
Thats what we say about city folk who tinkers non stop with the bow. He knows nothing about interpreting rub lines, knowing how deer use his area. Always tinkering. We'll be at the taxidermist shop, u still be chasing field points.
 

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Thats what we say about city folk who tinkers non stop with the bow. He knows nothing about interpreting rub lines, knowing how deer use his area. Always tinkering. We'll be at the taxidermist shop, u still be chasing field points.
Well.. You sure dont describe me and I do a lot of tinkering on top of a lot of hunting.
Redneckerson is always makeing excuses for being poor and lazy and trying to justify his ways by saying a bunch of dumb things like... I always kill 'em and so on and so forth.

He wasn't asking for hillrod advice on tuning the scope to the head or finding short cuts, as I remember.
But you go ahead and try to convince him that shooting crap is good nuff Boz man.

LOL!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
So I have had a go with the two-blades. Same as the Montecs: erratic trajectory.
Moderately "aimable" at 10 yards but already not grouping at 20.

Re-zeroing the scope is not the problem, provided the have the same POI for a given POA, but they don't.

Although I make my own arrows based on the Gold Tip Lazer Pro IIs and Swifts that get the same FoC as my .338s, the Koda originals do still fly that bit better. Not masses, though.

With Killzone mechanicals I get the same accuracy and POI as FTs. In principle, though, I prefer fixed blade for their durability and cheaper.

I don't know what it is I can do to the arrows to make they perform with fixed heads.

With the Montecs, at least, I had chosen arrows where the thread orientation allowed the blades to line up with the vanes.

The less blades the better in general. That said..
I have seen perfectly awful 2 blade heads compared to great 3&4 blade heads.
It is the head and not the number of blades that determines the end result.
I'm not going to lie: these are no-frills steel heads. Not some big brand.

The problem is that living here, anything I order has to come in from abroad: so that is EU prices, plus EU postal rates and now (given that the UK has left the EU), duty charges and local VAT on anything from my UK supplier who's got the best selection of BHs that I have found.

Ordering from the US: forgedaboudid... the duty charges are stratospheric...
 

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So I have had a go with the two-blades. Same as the Montecs: erratic trajectory.
Moderately "aimable" at 10 yards but already not grouping at 20.

Re-zeroing the scope is not the problem, provided the have the same POI for a given POA, but they don't.

Although I make my own arrows based on the Gold Tip Lazer Pro IIs and Swifts that get the same FoC as my .338s, the Koda originals do still fly that bit better. Not masses, though.
It's really hard to tell whats up with so little information and not having an eye/hands on the bow BUT it sounds as if it is the bow (to me) at this point. Possibly.
The only thing that might debunk questioning the bow is that you are saying one arrow type seems to fly better, if only marginally so. So, it is either the arrow helping the bows ills or it is that it is the arrows which are questionable. If you were able to check the spine on all arrows, as well as run out and nock location (in regard to high side) then perhaps that could tell you something in that regard. That said, I would look at the bow (which I am sure that you have) first.
If the tune and arrows are not proper, then no fixed blade can fix those ills and all will have poor results. Some less so but still poor in relation to field points/expandables.

I understand that you have already (I assume) spent too much money chasing the problem but if it were me (based on what you have said so far) I would buy the stiffest arrow available to me (Zombie slayer) and run one through the bow and see what happens. A stiff arrow (the stiffer the better) can solve issues that you are seeing in many cases.

Good luck :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
It's really hard to tell whats up with so little information and not having an eye/hands on the bow BUT it sounds as if it is the bow (to me) at this point. Possibly.
The only thing that might debunk questioning the bow is that you are saying one arrow type seems to fly better, if only marginally so. So, it is either the arrow helping the bows ills or it is that it is the arrows which are questionable. If you were able to check the spine on all arrows, as well as run out and nock location (in regard to high side) then perhaps that could tell you something in that regard. That said, I would look at the bow (which I am sure that you have) first.
If the tune and arrows are not proper, then no fixed blade can fix those ills and all will have poor results. Some less so but still poor in relation to field points/expandables.

I understand that you have already (I assume) spent too much money chasing the problem but if it were me (based on what you have said so far) I would buy the stiffest arrow available to me (Zombie slayer) and run one through the bow and see what happens. A stiff arrow (the stiffer the better) can solve issues that you are seeing in many cases.

Good luck :)
With the .338s, I can get arrows to virtually touch at 10-30yds. After that my group may open up but that is also my aim and living in a place rarely has still air!

I can well imagine that my fletching technique, or insert glue application is not as even and consistent as more practiced so it comes as no surprise that my arrows are not as precise as the factory's. With mechanicals Killzones, the POI is the same as the standard FTs on the .338 Magnums

Re stiffer arrows: I can certainly investigate.

I first picked the Lazer Pro II's and then the Swifts based on spine, straightness and price too. There were more expensive shafts but those Gold Tip offerings were affordable to me.
 
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With the .338s, I can get arrows to virtually touch at 10-30yds. After that my group may open up but that is also my aim and living in a place rarely has still air!

I can well imagine that my fletching technique, or insert glue application is not as even and consistent as more practiced so it comes as no surprise that my arrows are not as precise as the factory's. With mechanicals Killzones, the POI is the same as the standard FTs on the .338 Magnums

Re stiffer arrows: I can certainly investigate.

I first picked the Lazer Pro II's and then the Swifts based on spine, straightness and price too. There were more expensive shafts but those Gold Tip offerings were affordable to me.
I would suggest PMing Jerry and consulting him as to whats what for what you have. He may not have the skinny on everything you have available and you may not have access to everything he can tell you about but between the two..
He would be a great resource for you. He is a great man IMO. I believe he could direct you in the best direction from where you are.

Good Luck!
 
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