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Manufacturers often state an estimated string life in "number of shots". But is that really what matters? If I go hunting 50 times in a season, each time cocking my bow, leaving it cocked for hours and the uncocking....doesnt that count at least as one shot or even more? (In terms of stress on strings and cables)
 

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I believe the answers to both of your questions is "Yes". In my experience, the equation for aging ones equipment needs to consider more than cocking and shots. Arrow weight being well above manufacturers minimum, proper maintenance and tuning on your bow and inspections after any event such as dropping etc. I have a 2017 model bow with well over 2000 shots (one string and cable change and getting another after the 2020 season) that performs like when it was new.
 

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I believe the answers to both of your questions is "Yes". In my experience, the equation for aging ones equipment needs to consider more than cocking and shots. Arrow weight being well above manufacturers minimum, proper maintenance and tuning on your bow and inspections after any event such as dropping etc. I have a 2017 model bow with well over 2000 shots (one string and cable change and getting another after the 2020 season) that performs like when it was new.
Are you saying heavier arrows are more or less stress?
 

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Are you saying heavier arrows are more or less stress?
Heavy arrows are less stressful on bows.

I'd say shot count would go a lot further to destroying a string than time cocked. Time cocked will wear limbs, theoretically, but the snap, stress and physical friction of the limbs and riser on the string will be more damaging.

I'm new to crossbows, but would stand by that on a vertical bow as well. Fewer things are different than a lot would have you believe, I think.

All of this could be wrong, but there it is FWIW.
 
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Are you saying heavier arrows are more or less stress?
Less. The lighter the arrow the more the shot creates a close to dry fire situation. Vibration is an equipment killer.

If you want/desire/choose to chase maximum arrow fps with the manufacturers recommended minimum arrow weight, you will be replacing components much sooner than those who increase their arrow weight by 10 to 15% over minimums and loose ~10 fps arrow speed.

Good Luck, have fun, and most importantly be safe.
 

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Are you saying heavier arrows are more or less stress?
Your equipment is designed to transfer energy created into the projectile. If the projectile does not absorb a significant amount of the energy created, that excess energy will be absorbed by your bow. Just trying to explain the simulated dry fire situation.
 

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Who … has had to replace parts because of arrow weight? Nobody I know. I shot ten thousand light arrows out of my verticals and never had to replace a thing. In my opinion, if a manufacturer has a minimum arrow weight, that arrow weight will keep that bow running indefinitely. All of this is conjecture, speculation, theory, and opinion. Some here have an engineering background and make compelling arguments. But archery manufacturers have engineers too. Archery being their specialty. They have accountants, insurance companies and lawyers as well. Those professionals are not going to let a manufacturer send out bows that will blow up from light arrows, or bows that will require untold warrantee service impacting profits.

So like "penetration" arguments, we have to be realistic. Sure a heavy arrow penetrates better, but when even a light arrow has 7 times the required energy to pass through a deer, so what??? Heavier arrows may or may not be "easier" on crossbow components from a technical perspective, but manufacturer's arrow weight requirements aren't going to ruin your crossbow either. Heavier might make your crossbow last three decades instead of 28 years??? ;)
 
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Is it # of shots or amount of time cocked?


"So like "penetration" arguments, we have to be realistic. Sure a heavy arrow penetrates better, but when even a light arrow has 7 times the required energy to pass through a deer, so what???"


Well I think 7 times more is a stretch. Let's say 60 lb KE and the average crossbow shoots double that these days. At typical ranges that deer are harvested, a "heavier" arrow poses NO downside. It's a win/win. Heavier arrow better on equipment and quieter. A little more KE. No downside to me. You can also say that the extra FPS is wasted also. It's how you look at it.
 

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Both put stress on the string and cables. I say both will have an impact on string life regardless of what the manufacturer recomends.

Do crossbow companies actually give you a string life shot count? I never really paid attention. I can see the vertical bows having a shot count string life.
 

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Well, THE DUKE has spoken....his opinion, should be my opinion, in his opinion. My experience in vibration analysis tells me less vibration is better. You shoot yours and I'll shoot mine and it really doesn't matter which way is correct as long as we're satisfied. I am.
 
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In discussions several years ago with Tenpoint about string life, their recommendation was to change out strings and cables about every three to four years, regardless if they had limited shooting and looked new yet. The reasons being string stretch occurring from constant stress. They also did not recommend relaxing the crossbow during off times, but leaving it strung. Simple way to check string stretch is to measure axle to axle.
 
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