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I understand that crossbow technology is changing quickly. That being said; What are the performance limits of recurve technology? How about maintenance of recurve crossbows vs. advanced technology?
Thanks for your answers. CN was highly recommended as a source for investigating the sport.
 

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Recurves … are grossly limited compared to compounds. They're inefficient. They need back-breaking limb stiffness to stay remotely close to the speeds easily available to compounds. On top of all that, the leading crossbow dealer probably in the nation once wrote that "he sees no difference in the number of warrantee returns between the new recurves and compounds. So the "recurves are bulletproof and super reliable" argument is at this juncture just an urban legend. About the only thing you can count on is they're light weight and accurate. Although, there are some 6lb-7lb compounds out there now too. And plenty of compounds shoot as least as accurately.
 

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Bill as you can read how Duke hates recurve bows and threw out a lot of personal vile instead of true facts! Recurves are just as accurate and will kill any animal in North America. Good luck!


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Recurves … are grossly limited compared to compounds. They're inefficient. They need back-breaking limb stiffness to stay remotely close to the speeds easily available to compounds. On top of all that, the leading crossbow dealer probably in the nation once wrote that "he sees no difference in the number of warrantee returns between the new recurves and compounds. So the "recurves are bulletproof and super reliable" argument is at this juncture just an urban legend. About the only thing you can count on is they're light weight and accurate. Although, there are some 6lb-7lb compounds out there now too. And plenty of compounds shoot as least as accurately.
Did Dave happen to say that several years ago when they were having limb problems with the Excaliburs which has since been rectified?
Duke does dislike recurves and Ravin crossbows!
 

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I guess this falls under performance.

For the first time ever, last year I hunted out of a pop-up ground blind and a Redneck blind (with the crossbow). My Wicked Ridge Invader is probably about average for limb width. But in those situations, average is too much. Just getting through tight woods with even average limb width, can be a chore. My next crossbow will be one of the narrow limb designs.

While I am an Excalibur fan, narrow is not one of their selling points. I'll probably never own another one.
 

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Don’t believe a word of Duke’s despicable description. Expect no more from a speed chaser. Wheel and cable crossbows in their never ending quest for more speed are already having reliability problems with newer faster models. In comparison, recurve crossbows are bulletproof, especially those that are in the lower 300 FPS range. If you are a speed chaser, recurves are not the answer. If you are a down to earth crossbow hunter that likes simple functionality and trouble free performance, recurves are definitely worth consideration.
182008
 

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Recurves are definitely limited in the chase for speed. That being said, as Moon stated, recurves, in the lower 300 FPS range are super reliable, accurate to a fault, light in weight and just plain fun to shoot. No cams or cables to mess with or "time". Of course, you may need to adjust the brace height on your recurve from time to time, but it's not often. I do own both, recurves and compound crossbows and likewise enjoy them both. However I'm not a speed freak and all the bows I currently own shoot below 400 FPS. I find, what I term, excess speed, to be touchy when put into application in my normal hunting scenarios. I also find super narrow bows to be easy to "cant" thus throwing off accuracy. To each their own. I'll generally stick with my "slow" 'curves in most if not all hunts, including in ground blinds. Not had an issue yet to date, just my experiences.
 

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Bill as you can read how Duke hates recurve bows and threw out a lot of personal vile instead of true facts! Recurves are just as accurate and will kill any animal in North America. Good luck!


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#1. Is anything I said not true? :unsure: :)
#2. He asked for recurve limits, NOT defensive opinions on recurves.;)
 
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I own three different excaliburs and two scorpyds, I shoot them all on a regular basis. The recurves are cheaper to buy and cheaper to own. They are complete tack drivers when you do your part. Other then resetting your brace height once or twice a year and waxing the string they are maintenance free. They will kill anything a compound model will. If the arrow gets to the mark sooner or later as long as it hits the mark you put food on the table. On the other hand, compounds are more expensive, compounds have cables and strings that need replacing, compounds have timing issues, arrow issues, latch issues, serving issues, compounds are faster, compounds are more quiet on release. In my experience, the compounds I have owned take three to four times the effort to get them to shoot the same quality groups as the recurves. The need for speed comes at a price and produces mediocrity. Remember, there is only one grade of dead, a faster arrow only buries itself deeper after it passes through the animal. Your mileage may vary.
 

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Recurve
Easy to maintain
Higher draw weights
Extremely accurate
Can be hard on servings
Easy to disassemble for air travel
Easy to fix with no bow press ever needed

Compound
Can be a pain to maintain timing
Lower draw weight
Accurate if timing is good
Easy on servings
Most can't be disassembled for air travel
Most need a bow press to maintain
 

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Recurves are not the best platform if you are looking for big speed. The current Bulldog 440 (not sure of actual speed vs arrow weight) is probably the fastest produced so far, but they are not up to top Scorpyd, Ten Point, or Ravin speeds. Draw weight is high. Independent testing showed the Assassin 420 had a draw weight of 374#. I personally don’t think the high draw weights are as difficult as some claim, as the full weight only hits when my back is fully extending, but my heaviest recurve draws 295#. Sounds like a lot, but I can do a good 50 shots at the range if I want to (unless my back is stiff from something else.) Not really interested in a faster recurve, the one I have will more than do what I need. The width is no problem for me in my stands, and if you have a bit of common sense, carrying them through the woods is no problem either. It seems like Excal has the limb durability thing in hand now. Time will tell, I suppose.
 

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So there … you have it. Recurves are wonderful if you want to lob arrows in at 300fps like a civil war mortar. Great if you need to change a string on top of Mt Kilimanjaro. (we all know how often THAT's a problem) Has ANYONE had to change a string in the field? In 17 years I never saw anyone or even heard of anyone needing to. They're great if you long for rifle season and love hearing your recurve go off sounding like your 7mm magnum. And of course if you have a hankering for 300lb limbs alongside your face when you squeeze off a shot. A 130lb limbed compound can do just about the same thing.
182016
 
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Something most people overlook. It costs me 37 cents or more every time I shoot my wheelie bow.
It costs me 8 cents or less every time I shoot my recurve.
 
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