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I got a my first Excalibur (Micro 360 TD) and the original string came with it won't more than 2 weeks target shooting! I wax the center serving and lube the rail every 10-20 shots, but the center serving was destroyed within 100 shots (the serving frayed and not able to shoot anymore)... I was wondering if it's normal to everyone? if it is how excalibur eat string, any suggestion for string selection? Is the excalibur branded series or 1993x better than 1993? but it seems they are made from same material so I am quite confused... Or is it better to choose a third party string ?
 

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Boo makes some outstanding strings. So does Blacktail. Both are members here. Shoot 'em a PM.
 

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Lots of pressure on Jaws and serving best thing to do is learn how to reserve your strings if you want to shoot any brand of crossbow alot... Someday they will make smoother Jaws but it may be a while
 

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you will have to learn how to replace your center serving . I have made a jig to pull my string very tight while I put two layers of a very strong centre seving . I use .022 thou thick serving x 2 . you could just use a thick crossbow seving , but replacing your seving is part of crossbow shooting I would say .
 

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Check out Marty. He made a sturdy built string for my Excal.
 

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I got a my first Excalibur (Micro 360 TD) and the original string came with it won't more than 2 weeks target shooting! I wax the center serving and lube the rail every 10-20 shots, but the center serving was destroyed within 100 shots (the serving frayed and not able to shoot anymore)... I was wondering if it's normal to everyone? if it is how excalibur eat string, any suggestion for string selection? Is the excalibur branded series or 1993x better than 1993? but it seems they are made from same material so I am quite confused... Or is it better to choose a third party string ?
Installing a new string, or reserving your old string will be an exercise in futility until you deal with the source of the problem instead of treating the symptoms.
If you are only getting 100 shots on a serving, you string claws have microscopic pits in them that need to be sanded and polished out. There are videos and lots of opinion on how to fix this yourself BUT if you can stand one more opinion, this is a common, easily fixed, problem. But why, after paying what you paid for that bow, should you be expected to repair a factory defect yourself?
I would advise, since hunting season is a good way off, contact Excalibur or your dealer, and have them fix it.
 

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Either polish the trigger fork or send it back to Excalibur for a replacement. Then go to boocustomstrings.com and order the best string you will ever own for your Excalibur bow! Good luck!


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BigBowMan got it right. On a 360 TD, your single best option is contacting Excalibur.
 

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Thank you guys, all the info are very helpful! I polished the latches using Boo's method and see what's the difference on the serving life. Later will consider buying higher quality string and material to reserve myself.
I did the same but ended up sending the trigger into Danny Miller/Excal. Problem solved
 

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I did the same but ended up sending the trigger into Danny Miller/Excal. Problem solved
FYI, Danny will now only do warranties for walk-ins
 

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On my M405s and BD400, I believe that not only the smoothness of the claws is important; but also, the geometry of the claws themselves plays a part. I got this suggestion from Boo. Implementing this suggestion/recommendation, I virtually stopped serving wear on my Excaliburs. Good string care and rail lubrication are important also, sit secondary if the claws are not shaped well and smooth.
Hopefully , Boo will elaborate.
 

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On my M405s and BD400, I believe that not only the smoothness of the claws is important; but also, the geometry of the claws themselves plays a part. I got this suggestion from Boo. Implementing this suggestion/recommendation, I virtually stopped serving wear on my Excaliburs. Good string care and rail lubrication are important also, sit secondary if the claws are not shaped well and smooth.
Hopefully , Boo will elaborate.
You want strips 1/4" wide. Do not cheap out on the materials. I start with 15 micron (1,000 grit), then 5 micron (2,500 grit) and finish with .5 micron (9,000 grit). That will give you a mirror finish. You want to get the outside corners of the latch fingers smoothed out but not the inside corners. Going at the inside corners will make your latch fingers narrower and you want to preserve every bit of latch surface you can. Thread the strips in between the latch fingers and out the side. The outside end of the strip should point inline with the latch and the inside end you want to go out about 90 degrees to the trigger unit. See pictures.
This is the material I strongly suggest you use http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=1&p=33004&cat=1,43072
They are fine abrasives with grit that tends not to fly off and the grit is very homogeneous. So there will be no scratch marks left over. Do not go fast. The grit is glued onto a Mylar backing and if you go too hard, too fast, you will melt the glue.
The best way is to remove the latch. The second best way is to remove the trigger unit and doing it in the bow is for desperadoes. Using the most coarse, I usually use 3 strips per latch finger. I use 2 strips of the second finest and only one of the most fine abraisive.
Make sure you use some masking tape to prevent the debris from entering the trigger unit and point the trigger unit down. When you are done, use a small paint brush to get rid of any debris and then take off the masking tape.
Unless you have the latch out of the trigger unit this is all trial and error. When someone sends me a trigger unit I take the latch out and inspect with a good loupe or an electronic microscope before and after. So assuming you do this without opening the trigger unit expect that you might have to do this more than once depending on what results you get on the serving from shooting.
Keep in mind that once the trigger unit is opened up, there is no more trigger unit warranty. Also, don't think you're an Einstein and go at it with a dremel. You just cannot get a even surface with a rotary tool. I have replaced a few trigger units that were FUBARed with a dremel. Don't be an idiot.
 

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polishing the forks like Boo shows takes a little elbow grease and expense to order the abrasive material he recommends but mine turned out good on the excalibur with TT trigger, I wasn't quite satisfied after the first polishing so went after it again a few days later and I believe it's good now. order a couple sheets each of the abrasive material and you'll have enough for a long time. I never took my trigger out or apart.
 

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I used 1500 and 2500 grit polishing sandpaper from Walmart and it did a fine job on my rough latch. No more problems since.
 

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BOO, nuff said
 
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Has anybody tried just serving over the bad area where the trigger hits? Maybe just the center of the serving.
 
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