Crossbow Nation banner

1 - 20 of 34 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
119 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have never shot a mechanical broadhead before so i know nothing about them.That beind said what are the advantages and disadvantages of mechanicals? Do you prefer fixed or mechanical also.I will be shooting a Scorpyd extreme 175,so any tips and help is greatly appreciated. Thank you
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,794 Posts
The advantage of a mechanical BH is the ability to get a large cutting diameter. You can't get a fixed head that's 2+ inches wide to fly right out of a fast crossbow. The advantage to a good quality fixed head is durability. The blades (because they are not as big) will not break as easily. If you are hunting deer sized game you can use both efficiently. I have killed deer just as fast with a small diameter fixed head as large expanding heads. Bottom line it is the right shot that kills. Use what flies best. I use large diameter mechanicals to slow my arrows down as they pass through deer and beyond. People will advocate for both.
 
  • Like
Reactions: TomOnTheRun

·
Registered
Joined
·
501 Posts
As with a lot of equipment that hunters use, some have a passion for one thing over another. This is based MOSTLY on experience rather then all the facts. Experience is great and it helps build confidence. I used to ONLY shoot fixed blade broad heads and with much success. Now that the mechanical broad heads have been out for a while and most are VERY effective, I shoot those. The fact that they mimic the flight of my field points and have a devastating entry/exit wound has me sold! I have only once had one fail and that was one given to me by a friend. I shot a doe with it which I did kill but blades didn't open. That is one out of hundreds (literally). Most deer I shoot using Shwackers and I watch them fall over within eyesight. Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
119 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thank you guys for the lessons.I never really looked at it this way.Can you point out some favored fixed and mechanical choices of each? There is sooo many out there it gets tiresome looking through them all.I do like the look of the Muzzy fixed heads though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,794 Posts
Thank you guys for the lessons.I never really looked at it this way.Can you point out some favored fixed and mechanical choices of each? There is sooo many out there it gets tiresome looking through them all.I do like the look of the Muzzy fixed heads though.
I'm not trying to pull the wool over your eyes but I have a thread: "Great Broadhead Sale" in the Market Place.
These are top quality heads (not Chinese knockoffs) selling on the net for as much as twice the price. I am selling these because I am now using only 125 gr heads on my new setup. At these prices you can chose a few different ones and not break the bank. I have more fixed heads too if you are interested.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,477 Posts
The bow is nearly irrelevant.
The question of broadhead type is.

15 years ago, I tested more broadheads than all the factories and independents combined. I was part of manufacturing and testing for manufacturers and the public.
There are the credits.

Now...

15 years ago, I would have stood behind a number of expandables (few though) and not many more for the fixed market.
Today? I dont know of an expandable who's blades could withstand my tests (maybe Wasp) but the fixed market has exploded. 3X (easily) more excellent fixed than 15 years ago. All credit goes to the American market.
Try the tooth of the arrow heads. Google them.
Many many more excellent fixed, if you want a list.


I have never shot a mechanical broadhead before so i know nothing about them.That said, what are the advantages and disadvantages of mechanical? Do you prefer fixed or mechanical also.I will be shooting a Scorpyd extreme 175,so any tips and help is greatly appreciated. Thank you
 
  • Like
Reactions: whitetailzombie

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,242 Posts
I shot fixed until they made mechs. I switched and have never looked back. And that was back in the 80's or 90's.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
I will say first....I am no expert with no such achievements as many others that have, or could comment. However, I have spent a fair amount of $$ this off season testing accuracy of the fixed vs mechanicals on the market today. disclaimer I have no need or want to shoot farther than 40 yards. As I have no need or want to take a shot at a live animal farther than 35-40 yards. So all of my test shots were inside of 40 yards. And I have not had one Broadhead, fixed or mechanical shoot more than an inch different than my field points. With most shooting the exact same. Again, I have not tested every head out there. Nor is this coming from years of research and backed by science. Just me, in my back yard, shooting at an average block target. So take it for what it’s worth. I say all of this meaning with today’s Broadheads, in my opinion you will achieve relatively good accuracy from most that you choose. So it’s just a matter of opinion, which you prefer. Like choosing a vehicle honestly.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
377 Posts
As has been stated, it's mostly about preference. The advantages to mechanicals are they are supposed to fly just like your field points, (But they don't always) and utilize a much bigger cutting surface. Now a days many are rebuildable with set screws and replaceable blades, while many fixed heads were blade replaceable a long time ago. Once the ferrule (main body of the head) gets bent or twisted, it's trash. That's true of both type broadheads. It's all really just a matter of preference though. Any broadhead will kill if it's placed properly. Pretty sure people were killing game with stone and bone arrow heads for thousands of years. Use what shoots the most accurate for you. This will ensure you will be successful regardless.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
119 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
I do thank you guys for the help.Im new to all this fancy equipment so im in the low area of the learning curve here.I see alot of the mechanical heads are only two blade,is that the main style used? I know i am going to buy both and shoot them to see what i like best and what the bow seems to like.I guess im just trying to narrow down some of the better or more preferred ones.Thanks again for all the help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
377 Posts
I do thank you guys for the help.Im new to all this fancy equipment so im in the low area of the learning curve here.I see alot of the mechanical heads are only two blade,is that the main style used? I know i am going to buy both and shoot them to see what i like best and what the bow seems to like.I guess im just trying to narrow down some of the better or more preferred ones.Thanks again for all the help.
I recently went through this dilemma, and I'm not quite sure I have it solved yet either. I bought a pack of the NAP Spitfire heads and the practice heads to go with them. A lot of people on here like the Spitfire, so I figured I would check them out. My criteria was that I didn't want to have to use/rely on/replace rubber-bands, Shock collars, or O-rings every time I took a shot. So that eliminated most of the Rage heads except for a few No Collar models they now offer. Spitfires, Grim Reapers, Dead Ringer X Nasty, TruGlo titaniums, Sevr, Thorn, and a few others are not dependent on collars or O-rings. Next criteria was if practice heads are available or do they "lock" the blades for practice purposes. Either one is fine by me. One must also decide on front or rear deployment of the blades. It seems that rear deployment is more likely to work without fail, as most rear deploying heads are already well in to the flesh before the blades are triggered open. This helps assure a path for the head so that the blades are in fact triggered. Front deploying heads can fail to open sometimes or prematurely open in flight from excessive speeds. They also slow down upon impact because they deploy using forward friction. Eh...Either will work if you hit the right spot, as will fixed heads if you can get them to be accurate. So far I have the Spitfires and the X-Nasty's, both of which are front deploying. I am also going to try the Sevr heads and perhaps the TruGlo's, albeit the latter does not have an available practice head or lock out system to my knowledge, but come very highly rated from many people.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
119 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Thanks for the info,i have been hearing alot about the grim reapers,i went and checked them out then got lost in all the other brands and styles. lol I cant believe how many there is out there now.Looks like a few hundred dollars of trial and error headed my way soon.Thanks again for all your help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Thanks for the info,i have been hearing alot about the grim reapers,i went and checked them out then got lost in all the other brands and styles. lol I cant believe how many there is out there now.Looks like a few hundred dollars of trial and error headed my way soon.Thanks again for all your help.
You can spend as much money, or as little money as you want on the accuracy testing. It is my opinion that unless you are looking to shoot over 40 yards. One pack of whichever style you choose will shoot accurately enough out of your bow. Obviously as long as it is tuned and put together right. Again, in my opinion if I was going to throw out a few names of heads and put my name on them. Ones that I have shot for accuracy only, not all I have killed with. But have shot them and deem them “field point” accurate. Which in my opinion is within an inch of field points, for all purposes. Not all will agree, but that’s ok. If within an inch of my field points it takes a few clicks of the scope and boom....we are killing. I would say Swhacker 3 blade, crossbow, and the green. Rage NC (no collar), NAP spitfires and spitfire maxx, and grim reaper. For the fixed blade I’d say Magnus stingers and buzzcut, magnus black hornet and ser razors. Ramcats, muzzy trocar, QAD exodus (full blade),and slick trick. If I was not looking to spend all the money that many have on testing. I would either choose a style, and then 2 heads in that style. It will cost you from $55-$75 depending on brand and where you buy. If they both shoot great, then you have 2 heads to kill with! Or you can choose 1 head from each category. (1 mechanical, 1 fixed) and shoot each for accuracy.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
119 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Well i think as for mechanicals im going to try Bloodsport Nitefall,and the NAP spitfire. I like the look of the Gravediggers too.As for some fixed heads i have no clue. I like the look of the Muzzy but it seems kind of small for a fixed broadhead. Spanky-T, Thanks for all the great information.I kinda like the way you put it too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
145 Posts
The bow is nearly irrelevant.
The question of broadhead type is.

15 years ago, I tested more broadheads than all the factories and independents combined. I was part of manufacturing and testing for manufacturers and the public.
There are the credits.

Now...

15 years ago, I would have stood behind a number of expandables (few though) and not many more for the fixed market.
Today? I dont know of an expandable who's blades could withstand my tests (maybe Wasp) but the fixed market has exploded. 3X (easily) more excellent fixed than 15 years ago. All credit goes to the American market.
Try the tooth of the arrow heads. Google them.
Many many more excellent fixed, if you want a list.
Might have to try out those tooth of the arrow heads, those look pretty sweet. Nice that you can buy a sharpener made just for them too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
224 Posts
Tooth of the arrow offers a sample of their broadheads. Cost about $6. I tried the 1 3/16" 100 grain. Excellent flight and easy to sharpen. I love the one piece design.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,739 Posts
I have only shot NAP Spitfires 100 gr 2 blades for 20 years. They work for me and they fly like my same grains size target tipped arrows. The Spitfire is an expandable that doesn't use a rubber band. I stopped practicing with them years ago so I don't tear them up. Sometimes I get lucky and take more than one deer with one.
Here is an example of the doe kill I last December. Shot was from 24' up in a white oak at 20 yards from behind the deer.

Entry wound photo:
20191226_093107.jpg


Exit wound photo:
20191226_091544.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
145 Posts
I have only shot NAP Spitfires 100 gr 2 blades for 20 years. They work for me and they fly like my same grains size target tipped arrows. The Spitfire is an expandable that doesn't use a rubber band. I stopped practicing with them years ago so I don't tear them up. Sometimes I get lucky and take more than one deer with one.
Here is an example of the doe kill I last December. Shot was from 24' up in a white oak at 20 yards from behind the deer.

Entry wound photo:
I've heard great things about these broadheads and that's one impressive entry/exit wound. I never knew they don't use a rubber band. Looks like its some sort of spring action that expands them, are they a 1 and done broadhead? Honestly, I bought some swhackers this year to maybe try but I'm just scared to depend on any type of rubber band so I've decided to try out some magnus black hornet ser razor heads.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,739 Posts
They are reusable broadheads provided you recover them and don't damage then such as striking rocks which bend them. Sometimes it is necessary to sharpen or replace a blade or two. It depends on the terrain one is hunting. I have taken as many as 3 deer with one. My bow shoots so fast it will bury an arrow after passing thru sometimes.
As far as the the mechanics of the arrow. The blades are folding back and lock in place by using a small spring retainer that lies next to each blade. When the arrow's exposed tips strike the skin they will deployed to expose the razor sharp edges as shown below. That is why no rubber band is needed. And that is why they fly like a target tipped arrow. This same design as worked for me for 20 years. My nephew tipped me off on them.

181677
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
377 Posts
Yes Sir....I bought myself some of these to try out. They DO make a practice head for the Spitfire line. I paid $7.00 each for 3 practice heads. I would think as long as the ferrule doesn't get bent, you can just replace the blades and go hunt again with them. For $19.99 you can buy a set of new blades for 3 heads. Personally, I'm not wasting time trying to sharpen stainless blades. I also got some X-Nasty heads. They come with a practice head in each pack.
 
1 - 20 of 34 Posts
Top