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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok MISSION, we know you read this forum...

1. How long is it safe to keep a Mission crossbow cocked?

2. If the answer is a relatively short time (as in a dawn to dusk hunt) how long do limbs need to rest in between hunts?

3. Where is this advice in print from Matthews/Mission?

Thx!
 

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Crossbow Nut
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It may have happened, but I never heard of a warranty claim being denied because a crossbow was left cocked too long, causing damage to limbs.
Many states have what's called an "Implied warranty of merchantability". This simply means that a product offered for sale must be "fit for a particular purpose". Since crossbows are assumed to be used by people who will hunt with them all day long, it is reasonable that they must be cocked during the time they are in use, or they wouldn't be fit for the use they were sold for.
Unknown to many people, their state may not allow companies to set a warranty period, say for one year, when a product might reasonably be assumed to last longer.
Several years ago, i bought a 5/10 KW power inverter from an unnamed company based in CA. Had 2 or 3 that had to be replaced AFTER the warranty period, until the company stopped handling that particular model, which was an expensive POJ.
They sqawked, but they made good.
 
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Ok MISSION, we know you read this forum...

1. How long is it safe to keep a Mission crossbow cocked?

2. If the answer is a relatively short time (as in a dawn to dusk hunt) how long do limbs need to rest in between hunts?

3. Where is this advice in print from Matthews/Mission?

Thx!
You are absolutely fine for a all day hunt. By the end of your evening hunt hopefully you have shot a animal, if not simply push the decocking button on your bow and let the string down.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
It may have happened, but I never heard of a warranty claim being denied because a crossbow was left cocked too long, causing damage to limbs.
Many states have what's called an "Implied warranty of merchantability". This simply means that a product offered for sale must be "fit for a particular purpose". Since crossbows are assumed to be used by people who will hunt with them all day long, it is reasonable that they must be cocked during the time they are in use, or they wouldn't be fit for the use they were sold for.
Unknown to many people, their state may not allow companies to set a warranty period, say for one year, when a product might reasonably be assumed to last longer.
Several years ago, i bought a 5/10 KW power inverter from an unnamed company based in CA. Had 2 or 3 that had to be replaced AFTER the warranty period, until the company stopped handling that particular model, which was an expensive POJ.
They sqawked, but they made good.
It may have happened, but I never heard of a warranty claim being denied because a crossbow was left cocked too long, causing damage to limbs.
Many states have what's called an "Implied warranty of merchantability". This simply means that a product offered for sale must be "fit for a particular purpose". Since crossbows are assumed to be used by people who will hunt with them all day long, it is reasonable that they must be cocked during the time they are in use, or they wouldn't be fit for the use they were sold for.
Unknown to many people, their state may not allow companies to set a warranty period, say for one year, when a product might reasonably be assumed to last longer.
Several years ago, i bought a 5/10 KW power inverter from an unnamed company based in CA. Had 2 or 3 that had to be replaced AFTER the warranty period, until the company stopped handling that particular model, which was an expensive POJ.
They sqawked, but they made good.
Thx for hanging in on this with me JP. I have no less of an expectation than that especially from Matthews/Mission. However an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. I'd prefer to not go through all that if possible. I learned to take care of things growing up because we did not have much and it has served me well.
Cheers brother!
 
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