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Sometime ago somebody posted up an excellent detailed step by step process and the procedures to polish the Nemesis latches. It included everything including what specific grit papers to purchase, taping the barrel to not get scratches and how to disengage the latches for polishing and may have even had some pics. If anybody has it or there are several detailed posts please re-post here. Thanks Much!!
 

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Found this on AT,hope it helps!
Repair of Rough Latches That Eat Servings
The serving on your bow should easily last over on hundred shots and up to a few hundred shots if everything is perfect. Sometimes the serving gets damaged or worn early and here are some things that can cause it.
The first one is damage to the serving that you'll see that coincides with the edges of the rail or deck. It is caused by the operator "over cocking" or pulling past the point of the bow being cocked. It can be prevented by not cocking too far and minimized by breaking the sharp edge of the end of the string slot. Using a small knife blade you can slowly carve off the sharp edge.
The other way the string can be damaged is by rough latches. This damage obviously coincides with where the latches grab the serving and is more prominent on the right side. Very little roughness is needed to damage servings and the higher poundage bows suffer more. Anything less than a perfectly smooth surface on the latches will accelerate serving wear dramatically! For those who shoot a couple of arrows to verify the point of impact and then a couple more when hunting you may not notice it. If you are an arrow junkie like me and shoot several hundred shots a year you may see it in as many as 50 shots and have to replace the serving within 100 shots. This is not necessary and can be prevented by following the instructions below. But my first recommendation is to contact the shop where you bought the bow to have it repaired by the factory or factory warranty depot.

Tools needed;
One quarter inch wide strips of "sandpaper" in 3 grades.
15 micron (1,000 grit)
5 micron (2,500 grit)
.5 micron (9,000 grit).
The backing on these abrasives are suitably tough to do the job and can be ordered from Lee Valley Tools. Do not buy the adhesive backed sheets (PSA).
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.a...04&cat=1,43072
One and a half inch wide masking tape about 6" long.How To Do It
Place the tape all the way back into the string slot as shown in the picture above to prevent anything from dropping into the trigger unit below. If anything drops into the trigger unit you can have an unsafe condition so pay attention when you are working on the bow and keep the bow pointed down so nothing can roll back and drop into the trigger unit.
Use an arrow to engage the latches as if the bow is cocked.
Starting with the most coarse grade of abrasive wrap around one of the latch fingers and start polishing for about 20 strokes and look at the rear surface of the latch. If you see a perfectly smooth surface then proceed to do the same thing with the next finer grade of abrasive. If it isn't perfect then cut another strip and go at it again. Do this as many times as necessary. You will need some kind of bright light to see the surface and you do one latch at a time. You want a perfectly smooth surface before continuing. Once the surface is perfectly smooth and without imperfections continue with the rest of the abrasives. You will end up with a mirrored surface and a serving that will last a few hundred shots. Do not forget to clean everything up with a Q-Tip and some paper towels.
I want to stress that if you are not 100% comfortable with this and or do not understand the procedure then send the bow back and have it done by someone authorized by the factory or the factory itself. If you are in the US contact Danny Miller at Horizontal Archery in Sardis, Ohio @740-483-2312. In Canada call Excalibur @1-800-463-1817
If you choose to do it yourself you are of course responsible for your actions good or bad.
The material I describe and suggest you use are very fine abrasives and if used properly cannot remove any real amount of material. Do not be afraid to do what I suggest but you must understand what is being done and what your target i
 

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Scorpyd should just go to the old tac 15 tac 10 pse sled with string loop type setup.. Kill two birds with one stone.. So much pressure on the claws getting narrowed and poundages going through the roof trying to get to 500
 

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The first one is damage to the serving that you'll see that coincides with the edges of the rail or deck. It is caused by the operator "over cocking" or pulling past the point of the bow being cocked. It can be prevented by not cocking too far and minimized by breaking the sharp edge of the end of the string slot.
Can’t find it now but I saw a similar thread about the serving wear due to over cocking and I sort of poo-pooed that notion.

But reading Tnmtns post about the string slot - I think he’s talking about the trigger housing. Now that makes sense.

The serving on my Dagger is frayed on the left side but I’ll have to look at the TT housing and see if there’s an issue. I’m not sure how the Scorpyd sled does versus the hooks, but I know when cocking either the DS or the Vent - I’m pulling like crazy because the limbs are rather stiff and the serving could be getting frayed from the cocking process as I’m still pulling hard when it cocks.

Thanks Tnmtns.
 

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Can’t find it now but I saw a similar thread about the serving wear due to over cocking and I sort of poo-pooed that notion.

But reading Tnmtns post about the string slot - I think he’s talking about the trigger housing. Now that makes sense.

The serving on my Dagger is frayed on the left side but I’ll have to look at the TT housing and see if there’s an issue. I’m not sure how the Scorpyd sled does versus the hooks, but I know when cocking either the DS or the Vent - I’m pulling like crazy because the limbs are rather stiff and the serving could be getting frayed from the cocking process as I’m still pulling hard when it cocks.

Thanks Tnmtns.
Check your cam timing on that dagger. Left side wear was typical on that model when thing were a little off.
 

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Check your cam timing on that dagger. Left side wear was typical on that model when thing were a little off.
I dragged it out and I looked down from the top and aligned the upper and lower strings of the yoke - and I’m dead nuts in sync with both timing dots ( I was impressed ). :confused:

I finagled my calipers around the latch and I think they’re about .630” wide, the trigger housing is about .851”.

The fraying on the left side is about a fat 7/16” to 1/2” from the center of the rail. I’m starting to believe that the fraying on the Dagger is more from the trigger housing’s string slot than the claws on this crossbow.

Even though the cams roll over near the end of the cocking stroke, I’m still reefing the hell out of it getting it cocked and this could be where my fraying is coming from - good call Tnmnts.

And when I cock the DS or Ventilator, I’ve had some issues with them not catching when I eased up near the end so I pull like crazy now until it does catch. I still have some mole skin so I’ll see if I can wrap a piece around the end of the trigger slots on all of my crossbows.

My Ventilator cams are pretty much still in sync yet with the Rogue string and cables I got last summer.

However, the Deathstalker looks like a fat 1/32” or skinny 1/16” out of sync to the center of the timing holes.

I’m sure when I get my new Marty Mig’s World Class string and cable set, the DS will be dead nuts in sync as well.:D
.
 
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I just tried cocking the Dagger with a cord (not the bowstring). The “backstop” behind the latch is narrower than the latch. So when the bowstring hits the back stop from continuing the cocking stroke, and with the hooks on the outside of the rail, it would naturally want to wrap the string into and around the outside of the string slots on the trigger housing.

Be nice to see if this is happening on other crossbows as well.
.
 

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Hate doing a triple gobble but . . . I looked at the string slots to see if I could wedge a short piece of hard tubing at the back of the slot. When I looked at the right side I had to laugh.

There was a gob of Black Lighting (little egg shape at a 45º) in the back of the slot! The left side was fairly clean, maybe it fell off. So I’m confident I’m pulling the string into the string slots.

I thought being right handed, I wondered if I pull harder with my right hand and possibly I’m torquing the string sideways at the end of the stroke? The left side would drag against the outside edge of the string slot, the right side would drag against the inside of the housing which has a wider smoother looking section on the inside of the string slot.

I’m not sure I could keep some moleskin in there even if I cleaned it with alcohol. I bought a new scope rail/hold down spring so I might take it apart this winter and have a look. I replaced the TT trigger myself from the recall and even had the old one apart so I’ll see if there’s any way epoxy some nylon/teflon into place to protect the serving when cocking. I could try rounding the outside edge with a Dremyl but that’s a bit scary!

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I did mine on my Scorpyd, but I removed the latches from the trigger box.
Polished to a mirror finish and no more problems with premature serving wear.
IMO this is the only way to do it , doing it in the bow only gets the side's and back .
NOT THE TIPS where IMO is where the problem is !!!

Think about the string rolling off the latch !!! A Aha moment will happen !!!
 

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IMO this is the only way to do it , doing it in the bow only gets the side's and back .
NOT THE TIPS where IMO is where the problem is !!!

Think about the string rolling off the latch !!! A Aha moment will happen !!!

Yup.

Tool
 

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What is the procedure for removing the trigger latch?
It is a fairly easy thing to do , but it will void your warranty , that is the big problem with taking the trigger box apart .
You could call Scorpyd and request they do it for you !!
 

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What is the procedure for removing the trigger latch?
Actually, my original reason was to solve the noisy safety and it took disassembling the trigger to find the root cause. Once the scope rail and stock were removed (don’t forget the nylon washer for the trigger linkage), I believe there are 2 screws underneath that secures the trigger housing to the rail.

I think there’s only 2 screws that holds the 2 trigger housing halves together, plus 2 locator pins. Nothing flies apart when the halves are separated. My Ventilator was out of warranty anyway and the solving the noisy safety was paramount for me - it’s super quiet now. I can’t remember all the steps but removing and then reinstalling the springs was easier than it looks. The latch just slipped off the pivot pin I think.

I’ve never been afraid to take things apart but I usually take numerous pics during the process. (I just replaced the walking belt on my wife’s treadmill yesterday - that was easier than it looked as well). :confused:


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IMO this is the only way to do it , doing it in the bow only gets the side's and back .
NOT THE TIPS where IMO is where the problem is !!!

Think about the string rolling off the latch !!! A Aha moment will happen !!!
I agree and disagree. It depends... When I did my Scorpyd on the bow I had no more fraying at all thus I got what what causing the problem without having to tear down my bow and pull the latches. Had I not been able to get the burr off the latches then I would have pulled the latches out and done them again. I followed the procedure outlined by Don Katsumi (Boo) and it worked just fine. I would think that Don has done more latch polishing than all the rest of us combined.
 

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I agree and disagree. It depends... When I did my Scorpyd on the bow I had no more fraying at all thus I got what what causing the problem without having to tear down my bow and pull the latches. Had I not been able to get the burr off the latches then I would have pulled the latches out and done them again. I followed the procedure outlined by Don Katsumi (Boo) and it worked just fine. I would think that Don has done more latch polishing than all the rest of us combined.
You may be right , case by case i guess !!
i was referring to some of the guys polishing and still having problems .
 
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