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HI folks , just purchased a new Ravin R20. Got tired of my SAS 390 aggressor blowing a limb ever other year so here I am. I've read though the entire sub-forum twice. Just looking for any tips to prolong the bow. I don't have a press yet and do understand that this is like owning a Ferrari (just cause you can afford the car dosent mean you can afford the maintenance ).I haven't shot it yet as I'm afraid I might mess something up or should have done something different. All input is absolutely welcomed. I'm still a newbie at crossbows and hunting in general so go easy. I do have a backup bow also but hopefully she can sit the next few seasons out. The R20 will be used quite a bit as our deer season runs from mid September to end of January and temp will range from 80 to -3. Thanks in advance.
 

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Welcome wjlizard! Your season sounds like the ones I had in Ohio 40 years ago. After I got married in 1977, I moved up there in '78. Then moved back down here in '81. Jan and Fed are a little to cold for me. 😄

You'll find lots of great folks here. And some excellent advice by some great people.
 

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Yah, that is almost parallel to where I was, in Ashland, OH. I rented a house on a centennial farm while there. Beautiful country. Big big deer!

That is also when I bought my first crossbow. It had metal limbs. And the bolts/arrows had glue on heads.
 

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Hi Wjlizard,
Welcome to the Nation and hope you enjoy that R20.
If it's Ravin info. you're looking for, this is the place.
Ravin fanboys are rampant on here and as Texas Grown has said, a lot of good folks as well.
 

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Buy a good target. I went to my supply store and picked up a xbow target that damaged my fletchings and needed the arrows to be pushed out from the back side, got myself a spyderweb a few days ago and the arrows are happier and so am I.

Don't be afraid to shoot it either. Ravins are designed well enough that arrows have to be nocked and safety off before it'll fire, I've pulled the trigger a few times without an arrow in my 29x and safety off and the bow didn't blow up, cant say that about every xbow. Just make sure your arrows are good and theres not a lot to mess up or do differently. You need experience to learn and you don't need to know much to start getting experience. Someone already said read the manual, gives you what you need to get started.

Decocking it's more important to just hang onto the handle and keep the lever in the back down, human arms don't move in circles like that naturally so as long as your hand is gripping the handle and the xbow is stable nothing short of the crank breaking will cause trouble. I cocked and decocked my bow probably 2 dozen times before launching an arrow with it, totally unnecessary but it made me feel better.

Also avoid making the handle slip when cocking it. I got in the bad habit of cranking mine until it slips which may cause it to slip more easily in cold weather.

I recently ordered some limb dampeners, didn't initially buy them because I wasn't convinced that a couple less db's would change games' reaction, but they help extend the life of the bow by absorbing some of the excess energy.

I'm also a recent Ravin-club joiner, finally legal in VT for everyone this year (previously only disabled people could use xbows) so all I've done is target practice and chimpmunk control and thus am one of the least experienced people on the forum. Maybe it's a summary of what you learned reading the forums like an encyclopedia, but I figured since we're in a similar boat I'd share what I can.

I ordered some of Mr. bigbird1's 3d printed accessories, I'll share my thoughts on them after I fiddle with them a bit.

Also, lube makes the best things in life better.
 

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Welcome to the forum.
There is loads of info here folks have shared.
Get real familiar with yours Manual and bow before you cock and eventually shoot. You’ll need a stout target too.
I had a R20 at one time. A real shooter too.
Congrats on your purchase.
I recommend you get a press.
And learn how to tune/adjust your bow.
A small video showing my R20 at 100 yards on paper.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for the replies. Should I lube the serving from the get go or nock and shoot a few before lubing? I have to be honest, the 100yd accuracy and narrow limbs sealed the deal over the Excel Bulldog. I hunt long open gas lines to tight vine infested woods.
Which limb damping device is recommended?
 

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Thanks for the replies. Should I lube the serving from the get go or nock and shoot a few before lubing? I have to be honest, the 100yd accuracy and narrow limbs sealed the deal over the Excel Bulldog. I hunt long open gas lines to tight vine infested woods.
Which limb damping device is recommended?
For best accuracy/consistency DO NOT put anything (Lube) in center serving area. I disagree with manual on this obviously. Remember Ravin has no fail groove to guide bolt. The nock being noxked on string guides bolt.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
That's great info, just the tips I'm looking for. Thank you. Keep them coming...
 

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I just ordered whatever the Ravin brand is, $30 seems to be the price and I'd lube it from the get go.
For best accuracy/consistency DO NOT put anything (Lube) in center serving area. I disagree with manual on this obviously. Remember Ravin has no fail groove to guide bolt. The nock being noxked on string guides bolt.
I don't follow why no lube where you nock?
 

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I just ordered whatever the Ravin brand is, $30 seems to be the price and I'd lube it from the get go.

I don't follow why no lube where you nock?
I would think that the last thing you want to do is make it easier for the nock to move left or right on the string.
 

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I would think that the last thing you want to do is make it easier for the nock to move left or right on the string.
How would it do that with the trigger mechanism the way it is and wouldn't you want your arrow to have the least resistance breaking itself off the string? I'm no physicist but I'm having a hard time picturing lateral movement when the knock clips on and is set at the farthest point from each of the cams. Since the only force applied is from the string, and the only resistance is from the arrow, doesn't this ensure the arrow sits at the back of a V, and that to move laterally either the bottom of the V has to flatten or itself move laterally, neither of which should happen on a tuned bow?

In my mind lubing the center extends the life of the string and allows the arrow to deliver more force, but I'm ready to be proven wrong.
 

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How would it do that with the trigger mechanism the way it is and wouldn't you want your arrow to have the least resistance breaking itself off the string? I'm no physicist but I'm having a hard time picturing lateral movement when the knock clips on and is set at the farthest point from each of the cams. Since the only force applied is from the string, and the only resistance is from the arrow, doesn't this ensure the arrow sits at the back of a V, and that to move laterally either the bottom of the V has to flatten or itself move laterally, neither of which should happen on a tuned bow?

In my mind lubing the center extends the life of the string and allows the arrow to deliver more force, but I'm ready to be proven wrong.
Go ahead and lube then. See how consistent your bow shoots. Separated serving will also cause nock slippage. And will cause inconsistent poi.
 

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How would it do that with the trigger mechanism the way it is and wouldn't you want your arrow to have the least resistance breaking itself off the string? I'm no physicist but I'm having a hard time picturing lateral movement when the knock clips on and is set at the farthest point from each of the cams. Since the only force applied is from the string, and the only resistance is from the arrow, doesn't this ensure the arrow sits at the back of a V, and that to move laterally either the bottom of the V has to flatten or itself move laterally, neither of which should happen on a tuned bow?

In my mind lubing the center extends the life of the string and allows the arrow to deliver more force, but I'm ready to be proven wrong.
The problem is even if your Ravin is so called 'Tuned' (IE cams in synch and timed when the bow is uncocked), that doesn't mean the nock won't slide laterally. Check your cam timing when the bow is cocked and in most cases, you'll find the cams won't be synched. Hence, when the bow is shot, there will be some lateral force applied to the nock. This is a result of slight differences in limb strength between the left and right side. The cam on the stiffer side will rotate more than the cam on the weaker side.
This is exactly why center serving lubricant is NOT a good idea. As you get more experienced with tuning your Ravin, you will learn there are ways to minimize lateral nock travel but I still don't recommend any lubricant. This is exactly why I made the nock centering tool.
 

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I am also noticing there is a bit of wiggle room in the trigger box when the arrow is fully nocked. Is it a good idea to push it all the way to one side? I checked my bow and there doesnt seem to be a difference I can see cocked and uncocked where the cables are in the guides. Is there a more precise way to measure this accurately?
 

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The problem is even if your Ravin is so called 'Tuned' (IE cams in synch and timed when the bow is uncocked), that doesn't mean the nock won't slide laterally. Check your cam timing when the bow is cocked and in most cases, you'll find the cams won't be synched. Hence, when the bow is shot, there will be some lateral force applied to the nock. This is a result of slight differences in limb strength between the left and right side. The cam on the stiffer side will rotate more than the cam on the weaker side.
This is exactly why center serving lubricant is NOT a good idea. As you get more experienced with tuning your Ravin, you will learn there are ways to minimize lateral nock travel but I still don't recommend any lubricant. This is exactly why I made the nock centering tool.

Bigbird1, are you refering to the difference "Limb Deflection" makes when at full draw compared to at rest? I used that concept when tuning dual cam vertical bows. The closer the deflection of each limb is to the other, the more accurate a vertical dual cam bow becomes. They tune easier. And helps with keeping them in sync when tuned (provided having a good string). I can see where such short limb bows as Ravin has, deflection would be critical in trying to keep everything in sync. And it wouldn't take much to get them out of time with all the stress factors for such short limbs.
 
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