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Armed Citizen
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Not quite a radar (((NC))) but an opportunity.

State's hunters may see changes
Mike Zlotnicki, Staff WriterComment on this story
RALEIGH - Tar Heel hunters may be able to hunt longer, with more types of weapons -- and in some cases -- on Sundays if several proposals announced at Wednesday's wildlife commissioners meeting are approved.
The sweeping changes in regulations -- particularly for deer hunting -- would affect hundreds of thousands of hunters in the state.
David W. Hoyle Jr., chairman of the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission's Big Game Committee, announced several proposals during the meeting at the commission's headquarters on N.C. State's Centennial Campus.
Among the proposals:
* Create a single deer season for the state. Now, there are four main regional seasons. The new season would be the same as the current Eastern Deer Season, which this year runs Sept. 13 to Jan. 1.
* Allow bow hunting and falconry on Sundays on private land.
* Allow hunters to choose any weapon (bow, muzzleloader or center-fire rifle) from the start of the hunting season when on private land.
* Move the opening of turkey season to the first Saturday of April statewide, which would extend the season by about a week.
* Ask the legislature for the authority to regulate deer hunting with dogs, and possibly fine dog owners when hounds trespass on private land.
* Allow the hunting of coyotes at night with the use of artificial lights.
Hoyle, who is from Dallas, N.C., said the issues were part of the public input process used to consider rule changes. Seven meetings are held each year, usually in Raleigh, but also in Corolla and Pisgah Forest. The proposals will be made final in committees and presented at public hearings throughout the state. The commissioners will vote to accept or reject the proposals in the spring. The earliest any changes could take effect is July 1, 2009, Hoyle said.
The deer-season changes are based on two factors: deer population and hunter retention.
"Sunday hunting is a tool to put more people in the field," Hoyle said. "If we want to sell more licenses, we have to offer them more opportunity."
Commission chairman Wes Seegars of Goldsboro also cited car accidents and farming issues.
"All of this [deer regulation proposals] is an attempt at two things: one, hunter retention, and two, to bring the deer population down," Seegars said. "From the insurance agency, we know that we've got more car/deer strikes [collisions], and also some of the farming organizations have asked us to look at a way to bring down the deer population."
Most of the proposals sound good to Chad Morgan. When the 39-year-old Raleigh resident isn't working as branch manager for a wire cable distributor, he can be found hunting or fishing.
"If it's got fur or feathers, I'll chase it," he said.
One proposal Morgan disagrees with is the elimination of separate weapon seasons for deer hunting.
"I think we still need to have distinction between seasons," he said. "From a deer-hunting perspective, that would be too much pressure [on deer]. It would inhibit your chance to harvest a trophy buck with a bow."
Morgan said he favors the Sunday hunting proposal.
"Part of it is selfish," he said. "It would give me an extra day in the woods with my daughter. Saturdays are filled up with soccer and other stuff."
All proposals will be open for public input after committees make recommendations about which proposals to take to the annual public hearings. The public can also comment now at [email protected].
The commission did vote to make a changes in dove hunting regulations. The daily bag limit would be 15 (up from 12), and only on opening day would shooting start at noon. The rest of the opening week, shooting would be allowed a half-hour before sunrise.
The 18 members of the wildlife commission are political appointees who help to create and maintain laws and regulations governing hunting, fishing and boating activities in the state.
It would seem that extending the archery season a few weeks and adding the crossbow to it would get the results they need. Instead they want to extend the gun season.
 

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Senior Member
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Dan,

You have to realize that NC has five different deer seasons with different lengths (Eastern, Western, Northwestern, Central and an extended season just for Rutherford and Cleveland Counties) not to mention different seasons for federal lands.

Crossbows are only legal for disabled people.

Where I hunt the gun season is three weeks long.
 

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Obsessed Huntress
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One of my past hunters was here in July to go bow fishing and he said there's a BIG stink over hunting deer with dogs there. He explained that that's the way it's been done for generations, so it's going to be hard to control or change it, but alot of bow hunters especially, are the ones that want it changed as it messes up their hunting when a group of hounds run deer past their stands.
So tradition is on the line, and I can see where it's going to be a hot topic with heated debates.

Here in Texas, we can't do that at all. We can use a dog to track a wounded deer, but it has to be leashed at all times so that there is no problem with loose hounds trespassing. You have a dog or dogs unattended trespassing, you're liable to have a dead dog or dogs when a hunter or landowner shoots it, and does so legally.
 

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Banned
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We got the big stink here over deer with dogs too. State is spending $250,000 on a survey by Virginia Tech. One of the guys on the committee they have is the president of a past hunt club I was in. I have emails where he admits to illegally training his dogs out of season during bow & ML on deer for the last 10 years. He doesn't like me anymore. Right after I sent them to the whole committee and staff and made it public I fell from grace.:rolleyes:


Those that haven't had to deal with the dog hunter mindset should consider themselves lucky.
 

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Obsessed Huntress
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Imagine that? LMAO.
Theres' something I tell all youngsters who think they want to be somebody someday. "Watch what you say". Especially in writing, because it will never go away.;)
 

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Senior Member
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Dog hunting for deer is only legal in part of the state and it is not legal during the archery season.

If archery hunters during the gun season are complaining about deer dogs lawfully running by their bow stand, then I say tough.

But if the dogs are being run illegally, then those 'doggers' need to be prosecuted.
 

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Senior Member
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Eastern shore Maryland landowners used to make a pretty penny off of
leases from me. Dogs running deer is the landowner's problem.

Just because someone's great great grandfather hunted that way doesn't
mean that that same someone should be allowed to force me into hunting that way.

Want to run deer with dogs?....have a blast...but do it on private property where you have permission.

Just because someone's dog might have run onto my lease doesn't give the dog owner the right to come onto that lease.

Good luck Virginians.

Maryland regulations...

"Dogs
Dogs cannot be used to hunt deer except trained tracking dogs
may be used to find dead, wounded or injured deer. The dog
handler must maintain physical control of the tracking dog at all
times and only the hunter and dog handler may carry a firearm or
bow while tracking the deer. Prior to tracking the deer, the hunter
must notify by telephone or in person the local regional Natural
Resources Police office. See page 12. If the nearest regional office is
unavailable, the hunter must notify the DNR Communication Center.
See page 12 for Assistance phone number. The hunter may dispatch
the deer only during legal shooting hours and by means legal for the
current hunting season."

There's a rich history of running dogs on the eastern shore which is shared by Delaware, Maryland, and Viriginia. I remember sitting around the living room after every thanksgiving dinner listening to my uncles in law talking about deer hunting on the eastern shore. You could understand maybe 1 out of 5 words because they had about 1 out of 5 teeth left.

Dogs were tools and they used them. They wouldn't think twice about shooting a dog caught running a cold rabbit trail, because it might teach a younger dog a bad habit. Young dogs that didn't progress fast enough were dispatched when it was apparent they wouldn't earn their keep.

God help you if one of 'em found out you shot one of their prized deer running dogs.
 
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