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Discussion Starter #1
Sorry if this is an old horse that has been beat to death - new to the forum and Ten Point, but not crossbows.
Anyway, have had a crossbow that specified flat nocks, one that specified half moon and now the Invader with the Omni. So is the whole idea behind the Omni nock to protect the bow from the string jumping the bolt in case you load the bolt wrong with a half moon nock or just because with the flat?

Of course I like my warranty, but the Omni Nocks get pretty poor reviews on the Ten Point website. Putting some bolts together and don't want to get a bunch of nocks that aren't going to work well for me. I have been shooting bows long enough to trust myself loading arrows correctly.

And as far as the sting jumping the nock, I would think the string would be less likely to come out of the half moon than the Omni, provided the half moon was loaded right.
 

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Crossbow Nut
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Omni nocks are a supposed "improvement" over flat nocks, in bows that can shoot them if they are installed correctly, but are also an improvement over the moon nock. Arrows with moon nocks can be mis-loaded in the dark or the excitement of the hunt. If the moon nock is 120 degrees off, a dry fire will likely result. Flat nocks can't be mis-loaded. In a crossbow that has manufactured precision that will enable the use of a flat nock, it simply doesn't matter how the arrow is loaded, it can be 120 degrees off and will shoot just fine in those bows. The Omni, when installed properly, can also be mis-loaded with the resulting dry fire. The small notches also act in a small way, like a moon nock, and tend to engage the string. This is also another attempt by a manufacturer to keep you using their product to "protect your warranty". I personally dislike being owned by my equipment, so I don't buy equipment that requires use of their stuff to protect the warranty. Follow the money trail IMO.
 

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Crossbow Nut
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Instead of saying " The Omni, when installed properly, can also be mis-loaded with the resulting dry fire. I should have said:
The Omni, when installed properly, can also be mis-loaded withOUT the resulting dry fire.
Darn site doesn't give much time to make corrections:)
 
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Crossbow Nut
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Glad you fixed that cause I was about to call you on it. :)
That would have been OK Robert, Mrs. Pine says I need constant snoopervision:D
 
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Sorry if this is an old horse that has been beat to death - new to the forum and Ten Point, but not crossbows.
Anyway, have had a crossbow that specified flat nocks, one that specified half moon and now the Invader with the Omni. So is the whole idea behind the Omni nock to protect the bow from the string jumping the bolt in case you load the bolt wrong with a half moon nock or just because with the flat?

Of course I like my warranty, but the Omni Nocks get pretty poor reviews on the Ten Point website. Putting some bolts together and don't want to get a bunch of nocks that aren't going to work well for me. I have been shooting bows long enough to trust myself loading arrows correctly.

And as far as the sting jumping the nock, I would think the string would be less likely to come out of the half moon than the Omni, provided the half moon was loaded right.
I've used the Omni nock in TenPoint, Horton and Wicked Ridge crossbows and have never had a problem with them.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the replies. So basically the Ten Point/Wicked Ridge Crossbows were designed to be used with Flat nocks, many people used moon nocks improperly, which led to high warranty costs. Solution to both - new proprietary nock.

My first thought on many matters too, is follow the money. But then I try to look past that to see if there is any actual value in idea/product. So Omni nock has value (to consumers) for misloads & nothing else - while of course quite valuable to Ten Point.
 

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Just me personally but I like the omni's work great in my ten point worked great in my mission 320,360 and several excalibers. In my opinion they are a good nock. I totally understand to each his own. Strictly speaking for myselfand happy shooting with what you use.
 

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Thanks for the replies. So basically the Ten Point/Wicked Ridge Crossbows were designed to be used with Flat nocks, many people used moon nocks improperly, which led to high warranty costs. Solution to both - new proprietary nock.

My first thought on many matters too, is follow the money. But then I try to look past that to see if there is any actual value in idea/product. So Omni nock has value (to consumers) for misloads & nothing else - while of course quite valuable to Ten Point.
A few years ago, most if not all Ten Point crossbows used arrows with flat nocks. Pretty sure they moved to Omnis when they started producing designs with the narrow front end and longer draws. The string angle became too sharp for the flat nocks to work on all of their bows anymore. Their Omni was a design that kept the bow from partial dryfires (as Jack Pine stated) no matter how the arrow was loaded.
 

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Joe PA is correct on the narrower string angles. If you use anything other than an Omni-Nock on the extremely narrow TenPoint or Horton bows, it is likely to be a "one shot & done" for the string. We have also found through slow motion video that the Omni-Nock out performs the other types of nocks on arrow flight down the flight rail.
 
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