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I'm not trying to goad anyone here or light anyone else's short fuse. From time to time we read discussions on Crossbow Nation concerning the optics quality of traditional scopes vs scopes with built in range finders and aiming systems. Often times these discussions are started by new shooters who are concerned with making the correct choice in scoping their new crossbow. I think what is most important is to ask yourself first, "What do i want to do with this new crossbow set up?" I have yet to see any crossbow aiming system that has the optical quality of my Zeiss or Swarovski rifle scopes. I don't need that level of optical quality at short ranges. I have used traditional scopes on my crossbows for years. As long as the model you choose has decent optics that will work with the speed range of your crossbow, and you shoot at reasonable ranges, you are good to go.

I presently own two Burris Oracle X scopes. I use mine to hunt deer from close up to maybe 40/50 yards max range. The Oracle X has has all the light gathering and clarity that I need for the ranges I hunt. When someone says "The glass quality of a scope like the Oracle X is no where near that of XYZ brand that I use", I understand what you are saying and why. When I look at a target 40 yards away with my Zeiss rifle scope and my Oracle X, I don't feel any disadvantage in using the Oracle X. If someone writes that the Oracle X is not as bright as some other scope, don't think for a second that the Oracle X is not much better than sighting through a muddy window. I can clearly track a deer and get a sharply focused aiming point 20 minutes before and after legal shooting hours. Would my Swarovski be a bit more clear? Well, yes, but so what? I bought the Oracle X for it's other features. These have been described here in many other posts. The Oracle X is optically just fine for how I want to use it. Could the Oracle X be improved? Of course it could. Would it be better if it were shorter, lighter, better level? Well, that would depend on your personal choices. If Burris improved the Oracle X would I be interested in a new version. For sure!

If you are into long range shooting at smaller aiming points, then maybe the Oracle X or any of the other electronic sights are not for you. I would recommend to any new shooter, or one thinking about making the switch to electronic sights, to go look through one first before deciding what to buy. Just because someone says one scope is not as bright as another, doesn't mean it is inferior in every way. I like the advantage of just track, range, and shoot that the Oracle X gives me. I have no problem with the optics it provides at the ranges and times I hunt. If something like an Oracle X is not for you and how you like to hunt or shoot, good for you. Buy what you like. I would suggest to a new shooter, or someone considering trying a new aiming system, go look through them first and decide for yourself. Don't automatically swallow what I have written here or what anyone else says. Take pro/con comments with a grain of salt. The only shooter I feel sorry for is the one who lives far away from a good pro shop or sporting goods store. It is hard to "see for yourself" when travel time and distance becomes a problem. I'm betting many shooters here, who have what you want to see, would travel 50 miles to help a fellow shooter. Just ask and see if someone lives nearby. Optics shouldn't be that complicated.
 

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I'm not trying to goad anyone here or light anyone else's short fuse. From time to time we read discussions on Crossbow Nation concerning the optics quality of traditional scopes vs scopes with built in range finders and aiming systems. Often times these discussions are started by new shooters who are concerned with making the correct choice in scoping their new crossbow. I think what is most important is to ask yourself first, "What do i want to do with this new crossbow set up?" I have yet to see any crossbow aiming system that has the optical quality of my Zeiss or Swarovski rifle scopes. I don't need that level of optical quality at short ranges. I have used traditional scopes on my crossbows for years. As long as the model you choose has decent optics that will work with the speed range of your crossbow, and you shoot at reasonable ranges, you are good to go.

I presently own two Burris Oracle X scopes. I use mine to hunt deer from close up to maybe 40/50 yards max range. The Oracle X has has all the light gathering and clarity that I need for the ranges I hunt. When someone says "The glass quality of a scope like the Oracle X is no where near that of XYZ brand that I use", I understand what you are saying and why. When I look at a target 40 yards away with my Zeiss rifle scope and my Oracle X, I don't feel any disadvantage in using the Oracle X. If someone writes that the Oracle X is not as bright as some other scope, don't think for a second that the Oracle X is not much better than sighting through a muddy window. I can clearly track a deer and get a sharply focused aiming point 20 minutes before and after legal shooting hours. Would my Swarovski be a bit more clear? Well, yes, but so what? I bought the Oracle X for it's other features. These have been described here in many other posts. The Oracle X is optically just fine for how I want to use it. Could the Oracle X be improved? Of course it could. Would it be better if it were shorter, lighter, better level? Well, that would depend on your personal choices. If Burris improved the Oracle X would I be interested in a new version. For sure!

If you are into long range shooting at smaller aiming points, then maybe the Oracle X or any of the other electronic sights are not for you. I would recommend to any new shooter, or one thinking about making the switch to electronic sights, to go look through one first before deciding what to buy. Just because someone says one scope is not as bright as another, doesn't mean it is inferior in every way. I like the advantage of just track, range, and shoot that the Oracle X gives me. I have no problem with the optics it provides at the ranges and times I hunt. If something like an Oracle X is not for you and how you like to hunt or shoot, good for you. Buy what you like. I would suggest to a new shooter, or someone considering trying a new aiming system, go look through them first and decide for yourself. Don't automatically swallow what I have written here or what anyone else says. Take pro/con comments with a grain of salt. The only shooter I feel sorry for is the one who lives far away from a good pro shop or sporting goods store. It is hard to "see for yourself" when travel time and distance becomes a problem. I'm betting many shooters here, who have what you want to see, would travel 50 miles to help a fellow shooter. Just ask and see if someone lives nearby. Optics shouldn't be that complicated.
Good points.
My 2 cents: don't rely on a scope's speed dial ring to adjust your POI in a hunting situation. Sight your optics and set your speed ring with the field points or broadheads you intend to shoot with then leave it alone. I doubt most of today's scopes have the resolution or repeatability, in the speed ring, to accurately adjust for different arrow/tip combos in the field. Then again, I have only tried the Ravin and Excalibur speed dial scopes so what do I know.
 

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It's all good use what you like and suits your needs. You know if it works for you or not, your the one out there hunting with it. You and i see what we see. Deer on the ground is the judge.

As to that trophy club that was 100% against vertical compounds. Who cares what they think. I have probably killed 15 Pope and Young bucks i never paid to put my name in there little book. Heck i didn't even get them all mounted.
 

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Good points.
My 2 cents: don't rely on a scope's speed dial ring to adjust your POI in a hunting situation. Sight your optics and set your speed ring with the field points or broadheads you intend to shoot with then leave it alone. I doubt most of today's scopes have the resolution or repeatability, in the speed ring, to accurately adjust for different arrow/tip combos in the field. Then again, I have only tried the Ravin and Excalibur speed dial scopes so what do I know.
Your right they wouldn't be ideal for that in the Field...u still have to split aim poins too!
 

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It's somewhat like cars. Some people drive a Prius, and some drive a Lexus. Both get you from point A to point B. Maybe more so, some can afford the Lexus, some cannot. ;)
To a degree. In my mind (scary place), it’s more like some people want any of the new cars that pretty much drive themselves. Others don’t.
 

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Boone & Crockett ... and Pope & Young are a pox on hunting. It's like MLB not recognizing that Pete Rose has the most hits record because he "gambled" on baseball. Which is pretty funny because MLB and all these leagues turned into gambling whores now...lol
 

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like all forums....there is the best money can buy and waht folks are willing to pay for.

In the end it all depends on what's important to you.
If cars are your thing and your very serous about them you might not care about a Prius regardless of price.
 
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Know what’s funny. Some people want to push there ethics on other hunters until. Someone says we need to stop killing young bucks. Then all of a sudden it’s hey buddy it’s my hunt I’ll kill anything I want to.
I just keep it within the laws of where ever I am hunting. Thats all the ethics your required to follow. If you have personal codes that exceed that then more power to you.
 

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