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I’m a novice crossbow shooter. My question is, if you are in a shooting position seated with both your elbows touching your knees (to help steady), will that “recoil” effect they shot? (I’m wondering if it’s similar to when a gun barrel is in direct contact with a rest it throws the shot). Thx for any shooting form do’s or dont’s
 

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No, I shoot the majority of times rested some way or another with no adverse impact. I've never heard of a rested rifle being thrown off target. I believe the cowboy is flinching prior to ignition.
 

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Just squeeze while looking at the center of the crosshair. Continue squeezing until the bow goes off. Concentrate on the center of that crosshair the entire time. After the bow goes off the arrow should hit where you were aiming. If not....re-zero.;)
 

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I shoot all my bows prior to season the exact same way as you described , as that is the way i hunt .
no problems here doing it !!!
 

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Gun barrels … vibrate and have specific vibration patterns. It's called "barrel harmonics." ANYTHING that changes those harmonics will change bullet point of impact. Resting the barrel, (not the forearm of the stock) against something dampens/changes the harmonics. I was working with NWCOA shooters down in Virginia a few years ago and one guy had a weapon light clamped to his barrel. He was spraying bullets all over his targets. Told him to take it off; the rifle settled right in to being a shooter. The Browning Ballistic Optimizing Shooting System (BOSS) threads a micrometer onto the end of the rifle barrel so those harmonics can be precisely matched to the ammunition.
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Crossbow "barrels" are actually just a 20" long arrow rest. They don't enclose the projectile, and there isn't much rail exposed to rest on something anyway.

It does trigger an interesting question though: "Does a Harris bipod attached to the "barrel" with a picatinny shoot to a different POI than a forearm resting on a sandbag?
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I’m a novice crossbow shooter. My question is, if you are in a shooting position seated with both your elbows touching your knees (to help steady), will that “recoil” effect they shot? (I’m wondering if it’s similar to when a gun barrel is in direct contact with a rest it throws the shot). Thx for any shooting form do’s or dont’s
All of the previous answers are no which is because they are looking at shooting a crossbow after years of practice. All of them have refined their shot process and its become second nature to them.

I believe when you have practiced something for a long time there are changes your brain makes to a persons shooting style we dont realize have been made. This is where the second nature aspect of syle development comes into play

But to answer your question with you coming in as a novice going into shoot crossbows for the first time im going to say yes it can

Everything you do effects the shot.

Some bows like a light touch, some are more accurate when held firmly.

You may find as with the answers above you do just fine as they have described.. but you may find another way works best for you.

Just go into learning with an open mind. Try various styles until you find what works best for you.
 

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Duke My MXB 400's have a Picatinny rail mounted under the barrel of the bow. I removed it on both bows and accuracy suffered. I replaced it and accuracy returned. To top that the factory spacer was plastic i cut a alum insert off and replaced it. And that improved accuracy over the plastic.

So Maybe IMO going off that experience the barrel of are bows like to be left alone.
 

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Just squeeze while looking at the center of the crosshair. Continue squeezing until the bow goes off. Concentrate on the center of that crosshair the entire time. After the bow goes off the arrow should hit where you were aiming. If not....re-zero.;)
Actually I’m sort of the opposite for scopes, the pins when I shot vertical bows, and even handguns - I prefer to focus on the target or the bullseye and pick up the center of the crosshair or pin over the target with my peripheral vision, especially if I’m shooting at a small dot.

I may be the only one doing that but it works for me.
 

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Actually I’m sort of the opposite for scopes, the pins when I shot vertical bows, and even handguns - I prefer to focus on the target or the bullseye and pick up the center of the crosshair or pin over the target with my peripheral vision, especially if I’m shooting at a small dot.

I may be the only one doing that but it works for me.
I believe we're thinking the same thing just writing it different.:) You definitely have to be looking at the tiny spot youre wanting to shoot while making sure the center of the crosshair (or pin) is dead on where it's supposed to be as youre pulling the trigger.
 
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br0adhead - in addition when using a tripod, you should put one leg directly out in front and the rear two legs set equally in back.

Theory is upon recoil, the tripod will “rock back” evenly and inline with the target, instead of the recoil pushing back against an uneven footprint support.
 

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Actually I’m sort of the opposite for scopes, the pins when I shot vertical bows, and even handguns - I prefer to focus on the target or the bullseye and pick up the center of the crosshair or pin over the target with my peripheral vision, especially if I’m shooting at a small dot.

I may be the only one doing that but it works for me.
I did that … for most of my life; like you quite successfully. What I discovered accidently while whacking vermin is that I concentrate so completely on the animal and it's body language that my pinpoint precision suffered. The crosshairs would be on the varmint and it would die, but I'd lose track of the crosshair. Shot placement wasn't as precise as I wanted. I worked hard to retrain myself to "see the crosshair." I'm still working hard at retraining myself so it becomes my default behavior when the crap is hitting the fan. Like yesterday, I had three deer wind me and start running around and going bananas trying to locate me. It was going to be a chaotic situation and likely only would have had a few seconds to shoot "IF" they would have come into range. "What's my default shot sequence?" Will I remember to see the crosshair? Will it be instinct now? :unsure::)
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I always pick a spot then put the crosshair on that spot. And i hold myself accountable if i miss. I was shooting with Dad one day. And he had a blank bag target and i said what's up with that. He said i like to just pick a spot and shoot at that. I said ok here pick any spot you want inside the bullseye i made and taped to his target. He learned that day is bow shooting was lacking.

You want your arrow to hit behind your aiming dot. Theres alot going on sometimes when the deer you want is there and you have to be mindful of other deer that are also around. One thing i do to train my mind to wait and when to shoot. Is i look at my trail camera pics going through each one. Thinking shoot or not shoot and where to hold. Also putting yourself in your mind or setting the camera up so your stand or blind is on the other side of the deer. Is a great mental exercise.

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Shoot or don't shoot.

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Now what great shot. But what about that doe. What if she reacts what if she is just in the way.

Pic/wait on the shot. Pick the spot then cover the spot up with the aiming point. All the while watching every deer. And do it really fast. It's called having a hunters eye :).
 

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After the bow goes off the arrow should hit where you were aiming. If not....re-zero.
Jim...If you are also a novice bow deer hunter, be aware that you may not hit the spot at which you are aiming on the deer through NO FAULT of your own. Some absolutely AWFUL shots result from deer movement after the launch. Don't re-zero your scope until you have read and reviewed posts and videos of deer "ducking the shot" or "jumping the string". Also carefully consider your shot placement in keeping with the deer's level of alertness and expected feeding movement. Of course, all these precautions are "out the window" when the rut rolls in. Put a couple of fat does in the freezer before you go after that "buck of a lifetime". It will help with "buck fever". 😁 Good luck. Looking forward to seeing you in the "Success Thread".
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thanks guys. Very useful info. I’ve got good years in with a compound, just haven’t shot crossbows long. Enjoying the group!
 

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br0adhead - in addition when using a tripod, you should put one leg directly out in front and the rear two legs set equally in back.

Theory is upon recoil, the tripod will “rock back” evenly and inline with the target, instead of the recoil pushing back against an uneven footprint support.
TP thank you, wasn't aware of that. Will apply that next time I go out.
 

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I did that … for most of my life; like you quite successfully. What I discovered accidently while whacking vermin is that I concentrate so completely on the animal and it's body language that my pinpoint precision suffered. The crosshairs would be on the varmint and it would die, but I'd lose track of the crosshair. Shot placement wasn't as precise as I wanted. I worked hard to retrain myself to "see the crosshair." I'm still working hard at retraining myself so it becomes my default behavior when the crap is hitting the fan. Like yesterday, I had three deer wind me and start running around and going bananas trying to locate me. It was going to be a chaotic situation and likely only would have had a few seconds to shoot "IF" they would have come into range. "What's my default shot sequence?" Will I remember to see the crosshair? Will it be instinct now? :unsure::)
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I have shot barebow recurve for over 50 years and in the day I was Dam* good

The reason i was good was I would lock onto to as small of a spot that I could see

We used to kid about shooting at a spot on a flys butt

If the crosshairs aren't in the center of the bull you won't hit the center
 

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I always pick a spot then put the crosshair on that spot.
Pic/wait on the shot. Pick the spot then cover the spot up with the aiming point. All the while watching every deer. And do it really fast. It's called having a hunters eye :).
I understand some of what you're saying but I don't get the context of when you are saying you "Pick the spot then cover the spot up with the aiming point" or "I always pick a spot then put the crosshair on that spot."

Are you saying, when you're out hunting, and you see a bunch of deer or whatever, you pick a spot on the deer you want to shoot and put the crosshair on that spot... or... something else? Sorry for the noob question, I am not very knowledgeable when it comes to this stuff so it's hard for me to fill in the blanks like the experienced guys here.
 
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