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Discussion Starter #1
Gents,

Do the Gen 7 cams on the current Aculeus model have any amount of let-off from start of cocking all the way back to trigger latch-up?

Or, will it gradually build-up in draw weight until it hits the 110 lbs. just before latch-up?

Not ever having cocked a Scorpyd of any kind yet (that will end early next week! :giggle: ), and coming from the world of vertical compound bows, the concept of zero let-off is somewhat foreign to me.....
 

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I don't have an Aculeus but my DS 420 sure as heck has no let-off at all. If using the long cocker just shorten the rope to where you have to pull the string back a few inches to get it on the notch and string and it will cock pretty easy. First time I tried to cock my DS 420 I couldn't do it so I removed 3 or 4 inches of the string and no more problems.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks very much, fella's....very helpful!! (y)

Robertyb, I watched a Borkholder Archery "Range Day" video where Nolan was doing the 60 yd. testing with either a Nemesis or Aculeus. He demonstrated the shortening-up of the long cocker by 2" on both ends (same 3"- 4" total you suggested). He also said it makes a world of difference on these 18 1/2" power-stroke Scorpyds!
 

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These are the Scorpyd cams WITH some letoff: The newer cams are a sweet Jesus moment at the top of the stroke.lol 110lb limbs should be like pulling your pants up though.
20151003_205516.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #9
These are the Scorpyd cams WITH some letoff: The newer cams are a sweet Jesus moment at the top of the stroke.lol 110lb limbs should be like pulling your pants up though. View attachment 184180
Haha! I hope it feels that easy! lol

Speaking of cams, I've noticed some recent discussion regarding the Scorpyd gen 6 cams vs. the latest/current gen 7 cams. Talked to Rex tonight and asked him what the differences were between the gen 6 and gen 7....and what their motivation was to modify the gen 6. (Make them a little faster, a little smoother, etc.)

His answer was interesting, as follows:

"The geometry and design is the same between the 6 and 7 cams. The only real difference is we left more material on the gen 7 cams. Less cut-outs, a little bit beefier to make them stronger and less likely to bend or twist when a guy accidently dry-fires his bow. Over last couple years, we had seen a noticeable increase in the number of dry-fires being reported and bows returned for repair work with bent cams becoming more common from getting slammed into the stoppers with no arrow on the string. To address that problem, we left more material on the cams during machining which made them stronger. It seems to be working well. The problem was guys were not getting the full-capture nock correctly seated onto the string. At the shot, the arrow would kick off the rail and the bow would dry-fire as if no arrow had even been placed on the rail."

Interesting! So with less material machined away...and left a little beefier (but with no other geometry or design/performance changes), it would stand to reason the gen 7 cams are likely slightly heavier than the gen 6. Might this have had a few fps affect on arrow speed? Anyone notice any chronograph changes from gen 6 to gen 7 cams (all other factors being equal)?
 

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Nope, no let off. All 110 pounds will lay on the latch claws.
This may be a very stupid question. Why if there's no let-off, have a cam at all? Why not a round wheel? I thought the idea behind a cam is to control the power curve and let off. Why then have a cam on a bow without assisting in let off. Let off will be beneficial to the center serving life.

Sent from my SM-A505F using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #11
This may be one area where the Mission Sub-1 really shines. Although it has a peak draw-weight of 200 lbs, with 80% let-off the latch claws are only holding back 40 lbs.....very little to no wear on the center serving with such light pressure. Also, the standard Sub-1 and Sub-1 Lite have a nearly perfectly circular cam. It is the "No-Cam" Mathews used on their TRG target bows I used to shoot. Really smooth draw and almost never gets out of tune.

Oh well, no worries....I take comfort in the fact that I regularly read here on CB of former Sub-1 owners that are now Scorpyd shooters! Something made them "see the light"! (y)
 

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This may be a very stupid question. Why if there's no let-off, have a cam at all? Why not a round wheel? I thought the idea behind a cam is to control the power curve and let off. Why then have a cam on a bow without assisting in let off. Let off will be beneficial to the center serving life.

Sent from my SM-A505F using Tapatalk
The cam allows for much more energy storage in the early to mid draw, compared to a simple wheel. A simple wheel would need recurve like draw weight to store a similar amount of energy.
 

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The cam allows for much more energy storage in the early to mid draw, compared to a simple wheel. A simple wheel would need recurve like draw weight to store a similar amount of energy.
Yes, but why no let off?

Sent from my SM-A505F using Tapatalk
 

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Yes, with the Scorpyd style cams, the speed really picks up in a hurry about mid power stroke.
 

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1. When cocking mine there is no noticeable let-off anywhere in the draw.

2. I’m using the long string cocker and I didn’t shorten the rope any (I’m 6’1”).

3. My string cocker works like a block & tackle, it cuts the draw weight in half.
Yours will be like you lifting 27.5 lbs in each hand.
 
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