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Discussion Starter #1
My friend took a pic of this deer in his backyard feeding and the one in the back you can see the shoulder blade really covering a lot of the deers vitals. What are your thoughts on this shot? Is it better to take a shot on a deer when they aren’t feeding as opposed to feeding like this where to my eye looks like less of the vitals are exposed.
181921


181922
 

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One in the back looks wired. I wouldnt. That said and to speak to the question...
If you are shooting a crossbow with 60 M.O. + .... There isnt a bone on a deer that will stop that arrow... Unless it sports a foolish head.
That deer is VERY unlikely to be where it was, when the trigger was pulled.
Also...
The shoulder blade doesnt cover a real percentage of vitals in this position and certainly none when upright. Guns aim for shoulders for shock value. Something that is irrelevant in archery.
This is the reason almost all shoulder shot deer (bow) are lost. There is nothing but a sliver of spine behind the scapula, unless you are talking quartering to and then it's still marginal.
 

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I'd shoot either in a heartbeat! Double lungs is a dead deer. Worry about hitting the heart and you might hit bone.;)
 

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Discussion Starter #4
One in the back looks wired. I wouldnt. That said and to speak to the question...
If you are shooting a crossbow with 60 M.O. + .... There isnt a bone on a deer that will stop that arrow... Unless it sports a foolish head.
That deer is VERY unlikely to be where it was, when the trigger was pulled.
Also...
The shoulder blade doesnt cover a real percentage of vitals in this position and certainly none when upright. Guns aim for shoulders for shock value. Something that is irrelevant in archery.
This is the reason almost all shoulder shot deer (bow) are lost. There is nothing but a sliver of spine behind the scapula, unless you are talking quartering to and then it's still marginal.
Good info here thanks lever. Question for you as I know you’re an experienced crossbow hunter, what’s your aim point on a broadside deer with bow? Would it be up the crease that forms right behind the front leg on the lower 1/3 of the deer? Included pic below for easy reference

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What are your thoughts on this shot?
Swamp... I wouldn't waste a shot on either of those skinny gals. Fatten them up for Thanksgiving. OTOH, I'd wait for that plump deer on the left to come out from behind the bush.

If your trigger finger has an insatiable "itch", go for the 2nd one and shoot the heart. Any drop will put you in the "pocket" behind the shoulder joint and take out both lung and major arteries.
 

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Plenty of lung there to shoot, but tell your buddy to feed those damn deer. They look like they are starving to death! Pretty sure either one would only make a sammich worth of meat. HA!HA!
 

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I would be aiming between 8 & 10 seeing that intersection being a diagonal line connecting the 8 & 10 dots.
I have the vertical line of the scope running up the back of the leg and the horizontal line at 1/3 (ground level) and 1/2 from an elevated stand of 15'+, with the deer out 15/20 yards.



Good info here thanks lever. Question for you as I know you’re an experienced crossbow hunter, what’s your aim point on a broadside deer with bow? Would it be up the crease that forms right behind the front leg on the lower 1/3 of the deer? Included pic below for easy reference

View attachment 181945
 

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I wouldn’t hesitate taking a double-lung shot on either of those deer. Of course they look like they’re working pretty hard to scratch out a living.
 
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