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Discussion Starter #1
I have been thinking about deer hunting MD for a few years since I have family there now that I could stay with.

I was wondering if anyone could give me basic information like how far from a home or building do you have to be to hunt & what is the law on retrieving a deer that runs on or across someone else's property. What types of land is deer hunting allowed? Any info that could help me would be appreciated.
 

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Here in Ohio cant hunt within 400 feet of a road, trail or building structure or shoot across a road on any state land. Different for private land. Must have landowner permission to get deer that strayed onto private land. I use HuntStand app and it has a feature that shows private land and gives landowner info so I can call them if needed. Just google Maryland Dnr and research their laws. Good luck
 

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In Maryland the distancing from homes varies by county. Where I live it is 150 yds, though some of the counties in Maryland are only 50 yds. Distance from roads is 50 yds, and I think that is standard across the state but not positive. What area are you looking at?
 

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From the DNR website:

  • Safety Zones: It is illegal to hunt, shoot or trap wildlife within 150 yards of any building or camp occupied by human beings without permission of the owner or occupant. For archery hunters this distance is 100 yards in Anne Arundel County and 50 yards in Calvert, Carroll, Cecil, Frederick, Harford, Montgomery, St. Mary’s, and Washington counties. In Harford, archers must use a tree stand when hunting between 50 and 100 yards of any building or camp occupied by human beings. In Montgomery and Washington counties, archers must be in an elevated position when hunting between 50 and 100 yards of any building or camp occupied by human beings.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
In Maryland the distancing from homes varies by county. Where I live it is 150 yds, though some of the counties in Maryland are only 50 yds. Distance from roads is 50 yds, and I think that is standard across the state but not positive. What area are you looking at?
They live in Anne Arundel County. With the safety distance I won't be able to hunt their place for sure but I probably wouldn't have anyway because they only have a little over an acre. I just thought I better find out in case a neighbor or two is willing to let me hunt. I doubt it though. From what I understand it's next to impossible to get permission to hunt in MD.

I thought about trying that app. I figured I would put download it if I get a place to hunt, but maybe I should try it sooner.


From the DNR website:

  • Safety Zones: It is illegal to hunt, shoot or trap wildlife within 150 yards of any building or camp occupied by human beings without permission of the owner or occupant. For archery hunters this distance is 100 yards in Anne Arundel County and 50 yards in Calvert, Carroll, Cecil, Frederick, Harford, Montgomery, St. Mary’s, and Washington counties. In Harford, archers must use a tree stand when hunting between 50 and 100 yards of any building or camp occupied by human beings. In Montgomery and Washington counties, archers must be in an elevated position when hunting between 50 and 100 yards of any building or camp occupied by human beings.
Thanks. I looked on their website, but obviously I didn't look good enough. Their website is so different from Michigan's that I seem to be having some trouble finding what I'm looking for.
 

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It is generally difficult to find private land to hunt in Anne Arundel County. I live on the edge of Anne Arundel.
 

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I primarily hunt federal properties, Ft. Meade and USDA. These are public, but restricted as you have to get an additional permit beyond your hunting license. There are also a lot of WMA to hunt in nearby counties (PG, Baltimore, Calvert).
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I primarily hunt federal properties, Ft. Meade and USDA. These are public, but restricted as you have to get an additional permit beyond your hunting license. There are also a lot of WMA to hunt in nearby counties (PG, Baltimore, Calvert).
I would assume that public land is pretty crowded & & doesn't have many big bucks. Would you agree? Just like everybody else I would like to find some mature bucks. I don't like to shoot anything less than 4.5+ year old bucks & won't shoot less than a 3.5

I heard of Patuxent but don't know enough about it yet.
 

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It is challenging to get a mature buck on public land in Maryland but can be done. I shot a 7 yr old buck in the North Tract of Patuxent (Meade) five years ago. My buddy has gotten some good bucks as well in the same location the past few years
 

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That's Awesome. Not many people can say they got a 7 year old buck. Do they let you go wherever you want to hunt out there or do you have to draw for different area's?
 

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My dentures are much too brittle to eat antlers, so I stick with the does. Many Maryland counties are over run with WTs, Montgomery among them. Over the last six years I've taken near two dozen in my neighborhood within 2-4 minutes from my house in backyards of 1/2 acre lots. My herd control has been so effective that I'm down to shooting yearling does (2). Talk about a tender backstrap! Some farmers and landscape nurseries have Crop Damage Permits and would welcome removal of excess animals. I got started when the local homeowners association complained about garden and ornamental destruction. One owner wrote on my permission slip, "Come to my house first, Please". The next summer she counted 22 WT in her back yard. In parts of Montgomery County there are estimates of 200 deer/ square mile. I would reccommend a careful reading of the DNR rule book. With permission of the landowner/resident things can get a lot less restrictive, particularly when there are cases of Lyme Disease in the neighborhood, expensive ornamentals are being stripped, and droppings are so thick that kids can't play outside without having to wash their shoes. But, like I said, "I can't eat antlers".;)
 
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