Crossbow Nation banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Wondering if anyone has experience with the Hawke XB30 Pro scope on the Ravin R20. I've been to the range a couple of times, and have it sighted in at 20 yards. I then adjusted the scope speed so that it was within 1 inch at 30 yards, but then at 50 yards it was 3-4 inches off. I ran out of time to continue shooting, but I wondered if anyone has this scope on their R20 and if they've been happy with it/are the reticles accurate at each 10 yard increment?
Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
934 Posts
The XB30 Pro (or most any other) will be close but not precisely accurate for 10 yd increments. The XB30Pro scope is not designed for any one (read, Ravin proprietary arrow) particular arrow assembly ,but generally works well for many with a vast number of arrow components, i.e., shafts, vanes, inserts, nocks, etc. and drag coefficients.

Generally speaking, most will sight in at a close range, for example 20 yds, and then skip the next 10 yd increment (30 yd) and then use the speed dial to sight in the 3rd 10 yd range, in this example 40 yds. Now you would have 20 and 40 sighted in precisely with 30 yd being fairly accurate. How much? In some cases it could as close as + or - (high or low) of a 1/4" to maybe 3/4" or so. Remember the XB30Pro is not designed for any one specific arrow assembly. BTW, most scopes with a speed ring are that way unless specifically designed for a specific arrow and its components and flight characteristics, such as the Ravin scope with Ravin arrows.

For your R20, if you're shooting Ravin arrows I would recommend sighting in the scope at 30 yds and speed-dial at 50 yds. At 20,yds you'll only be 3/4 - 1" high, on at 30, very close at 40, and on at 50. Thats a big range! I'm shooting a R10 which is a little slower than your R20 and thats how I have mine set up.

On another note, and speaking of the speed ring, don't get hung up about the numbers on the ring. Sometimes when you get things set up, the numbers will be pretty close to your speed, and sometimes because of the wide range of arrows and components, not so close. So if you happen to have a bow thats supposed to be shooting 440 fps, for example, and after sighting in at 30 and 50 the speed dial reads 420, don'tworryaboutit! As long as its hitting where its supposed to, you're good to go.

Hope this helps. Good luck.

Sent from my SM-T860 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,429 Posts
The XB30 Pro (or most any other) will be close but not precisely accurate for 10 yd increments. The XB30Pro scope is not designed for any one (read, Ravin proprietary arrow) particular arrow assembly ,but generally works well for many with a vast number of arrow components, i.e., shafts, vanes, inserts, nocks, etc. and drag coefficients.

Generally speaking, most will sight in at a close range, for example 20 yds, and then skip the next 10 yd increment (30 yd) and then use the speed dial to sight in the 3rd 10 yd range, in this example 40 yds. Now you would have 20 and 40 sighted in precisely with 30 yd being fairly accurate. How much? In some cases it could as close as + or - (high or low) of a 1/4" to maybe 3/4" or so. Remember the XB30Pro is not designed for any one specific arrow assembly. BTW, most scopes with a speed ring are that way unless specifically designed for a specific arrow and its components and flight characteristics, such as the Ravin scope with Ravin arrows.

For your R20, if you're shooting Ravin arrows I would recommend sighting in the scope at 30 yds and speed-dial at 50 yds. At 20,yds you'll only be 3/4 - 1" high, on at 30, very close at 40, and on at 50. Thats a big range! I'm shooting a R10 which is a little slower than your R20 and thats how I have mine set up.

On another note, and speaking of the speed ring, don't get hung up about the numbers on the ring. Sometimes when you get things set up, the numbers will be pretty close to your speed, and sometimes because of the wide range of arrows and components, not so close. So if you happen to have a bow thats supposed to be shooting 440 fps, for example, and after sighting in at 30 and 50 the speed dial reads 420, don'tworryaboutit! As long as its hitting where its supposed to, you're good to go.

Hope this helps. Good luck.

Sent from my SM-T860 using Tapatalk
Excellent post SamT. You nailed it based on my experience. Those small crosshairs on the XB30 Pro make it a darn effective hunting scope in my opinion.
The other thing I like about that scope is that only the 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60 yd. reticles are illuminated when you turn the dial on. This leads to less confusion for my old brain when it's time to make the shot.
There's also another nice feature of the Hawke XB30 Pro that is often not mentioned. The objective lens is actually very small in diameter because of the longer 30mm tube. Of course, this means the standard flip-up cover is also very small. Hence, when an animal looks up at you from relatively close range, he's less likely to pick you out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
The XB30 Pro (or most any other) will be close but not precisely accurate for 10 yd increments. The XB30Pro scope is not designed for any one (read, Ravin proprietary arrow) particular arrow assembly ,but generally works well for many with a vast number of arrow components, i.e., shafts, vanes, inserts, nocks, etc. and drag coefficients.

Generally speaking, most will sight in at a close range, for example 20 yds, and then skip the next 10 yd increment (30 yd) and then use the speed dial to sight in the 3rd 10 yd range, in this example 40 yds. Now you would have 20 and 40 sighted in precisely with 30 yd being fairly accurate. How much? In some cases it could as close as + or - (high or low) of a 1/4" to maybe 3/4" or so. Remember the XB30Pro is not designed for any one specific arrow assembly. BTW, most scopes with a speed ring are that way unless specifically designed for a specific arrow and its components and flight characteristics, such as the Ravin scope with Ravin arrows.

For your R20, if you're shooting Ravin arrows I would recommend sighting in the scope at 30 yds and speed-dial at 50 yds. At 20,yds you'll only be 3/4 - 1" high, on at 30, very close at 40, and on at 50. Thats a big range! I'm shooting a R10 which is a little slower than your R20 and thats how I have mine set up.

On another note, and speaking of the speed ring, don't get hung up about the numbers on the ring. Sometimes when you get things set up, the numbers will be pretty close to your speed, and sometimes because of the wide range of arrows and components, not so close. So if you happen to have a bow thats supposed to be shooting 440 fps, for example, and after sighting in at 30 and 50 the speed dial reads 420, don'tworryaboutit! As long as its hitting where its supposed to, you're good to go.

Hope this helps. Good luck.

Sent from my SM-T860 using Tapatalk

Great post.

Wyvern Creations has a tutorial on how to sight in the XB 30.

@samt how do you think WC's advise compares to yours?

I'm waiting for my R29X and XB30 to arrive in the mail and I'll be sighting it in soon. I appreciate the help!

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
934 Posts
Great post.

Wyvern Creations has a tutorial on how to sight in the XB 30.

@samt how do you think WC's advise compares to yours?

I'm waiting for my R29X and XB30 to arrive in the mail and I'll be sighting it in soon. I appreciate the help!

It has been awhile since I saw his video, maybe a couple of years. But without watching it again, the info of mine and WC's would probably be cumulative, or the sum of both. Some things that people say can be better understood by others when it's said a different way. Dave is very knowledgeable about crossbows. Take the info and let it guide you. Often there is more than one way to accomplish a task. Eventually you'll figure out what works for you, then you can post it on CBN!

Good luck.

Sent from my SM-G975U using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,541 Posts
Excellent info Samt and BB, to add to BB post about those lenses, the covers also are the most secure and the only ones you will never have to worry about slipping off once correctly secured. The smaller objective and less visibility is enhanced by the exclusive Hawke lens covers as they are integral to the scope, and fold all the way back for a lay flat position, I stead of standing straight up like plastic ones that slip over and are prone to slip off and get lost.

I highly recommend SamT advice for initial sighting in at 30 yards with any bow over 350 fps. This will allow a lower power (speed setting) and 50 yards works for setting the speed, but 60 will assure dead on at the furthest distance and make less difference the closer you get with the other aiming points, *- yard adjustments only affect 50 yards 1/2 as much, but 40 yards will affect 80 yards twice as much,,, MOA is what your working with. And like SamT explained, all projectiles will show minor difference from one to the other in flight trajectory.
 
  • Like
Reactions: samt

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Excellent info Samt and BB, to add to BB post about those lenses, the covers also are the most secure and the only ones you will never have to worry about slipping off once correctly secured. The smaller objective and less visibility is enhanced by the exclusive Hawke lens covers as they are integral to the scope, and fold all the way back for a lay flat position, I stead of standing straight up like plastic ones that slip over and are prone to slip off and get lost.

I highly recommend SamT advice for initial sighting in at 30 yards with any bow over 350 fps. This will allow a lower power (speed setting) and 50 yards works for setting the speed, but 60 will assure dead on at the furthest distance and make less difference the closer you get with the other aiming points, *- yard adjustments only affect 50 yards 1/2 as much, but 40 yards will affect 80 yards twice as much,,, MOA is what your working with. And like SamT explained, all projectiles will show minor difference from one to the other in flight trajectory.
Can you explain "will allow a lower power (speed setting) ". Is this a good thing?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,541 Posts
It is good if you want more field of view hunting inside 40 yards, even 50, big game at closer range will nearly totally fill the view in your scope if higher power and closest distance is encountered.

I realize I don't need more 2 or power hunting inside 50 yards, even 100 yards for that matter on big game. Higher power which reduces field of view for me is a turn off. Besides 30 yards not only allows a lower power setting as the arrows are slowing more the farther out you shoot, this allows for a slower scope setting to coincide with the speed and faster drop! Plus you now have one aiming point that will work from zero yards to over 35 yards with a dead on hold when aiming center of the boiler room, my preferred and only shot I wait for!

It is just more forgiving for hunting,,, were not shooting spots for score, were looking for 100% kill results and nothing more.I'll take anything that makes it easier, and more fool proof, for me this just that.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top