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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had my Raven show up yesterday from the man. Great service.
Put it on the bow this am CP whisper revenge 390.

I had to clean the boat up today and do a bunch of maintenance from sitting.

Took about 5 minutes to shoot the bow in just now. zero at 20 and 390 stated. Arrows were 5" low at 50.

My chrony is at the farm and I am out Tuesday if the grandbaby shows.

For the experts what is about the right speed for this bow me to set on the Ravenspeed dial??
 

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I had my Raven show up yesterday from the man. Great service.
Put it on the bow this am CP whisper revenge 390.

I had to clean the boat up today and do a bunch of maintenance from sitting.

Took about 5 minutes to shoot the bow in just now. zero at 20 and 390 stated. Arrows were 5" low at 50.

My chrony is at the farm and I am out Tuesday if the grandbaby shows.

For the experts what is about the right speed for this bow me to set on the Ravenspeed dial??
Probably not Jim. What arrow weight are you shooting?

The CP arrows supplied are 400 gn for the Dagger but the "up to" 390 fps speed the bow is spec'ed at are done with light arrows. Typically 370 gn. Back your speed dial down 15 fps to 375 and check it at 50 yards. Your 20 yard zero should still be fine. That should get you close unless you are shooting different weight arrows.
 

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Ravin scopes are a little different that most scopes on the market. On a Ravin scope, the 50 yard crosshair is in the center of the scope with 40, 30, and 20 yard crosshairs above center. Which means, you use the turret adjustments to sight the scope in at 50 yards and then use the speed dial to sight in the 40 thru 20 crosshairs.

Most *other* scopes on the market has the center crosshair for the close yardages, such as 20 yds or 30 yds, and the longer crosshairs such as 40, 50, 60, are sighted in using the speed dial.

I suggest going to Ravin's website and watching their tutorial videos on sighting in and adjusting their scope.

Good luck.
 

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I had my Raven show up yesterday from the man. Great service.
Put it on the bow this am CP whisper revenge 390.

I had to clean the boat up today and do a bunch of maintenance from sitting.

Took about 5 minutes to shoot the bow in just now. zero at 20 and 390 stated. Arrows were 5" low at 50.

My chrony is at the farm and I am out Tuesday if the grandbaby shows.

For the experts what is about the right speed for this bow me to set on the Ravenspeed dial??
Now that the 20 is sighted in sight it in at at 50 with the turret. Then go back and shoot the 20.If its high turn speed dial up and if low turn speed dial down. when 20 is dead on recheck 50 . It should be dead on 20 to 100.
 

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Samt has it right. You center a scope at its crosshairs, which is 50 yards on a ravin scope. Then adjust 20 yards to hit with the speed dial. Don't get too caught up on the speed dial number as long as the bow is hitting true. I've taken 3 does this season with mine. Best upgrade I've done for my bow.

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Norther was ripping here today. Little trouble trying to shoot in at 50 with the gusting.
So what you are saying if I get the 50 mark in you go back and shoot the 20 with the 20 pin and mine was about
2" high with 100 and about even with the 125 pt

I tried an old muzzy 125 and it was about a ft low at 20and the cheap 100 were all over.

SAM "Which means, you use the turret adjustments to sight the scope in at 50 yards and then use the speed dial to sight in the 40 thru 20 crosshairs."
I am not sure what you are saying in my cross bow ignorance. Do you shoot the dot at 20 then the 50 dot at 50 then come back to the 20 and I am lost. SO Basicly what they are saying is adjust the speed dial and keep shooting till the vertical point of aim is at the same as the scope for the 20 yard dot? Say I was 2" high at 20 and shot the bow in at 375 I would go to 350 and shoot again till it was matcing?


I thought the Ravin utube sucked because the guy shot 4 arrows and did not show you any corrections and did not show a nubie how to really do something. I can go to the rifle range and have touching or 1/2 inch 3 shot groups but it does not show you much other than I can shoot and my gun was well bedded. Just cannot do sh-- with the new cross bow. ;)

If I cannot get it fixed in the am then I have to leave it home and I wanted to shoot some does where I am going in the Hill country.

Where on the site is good information on setting up broad heads correctly and shooting them in? Thanks, Jim
 

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Set the speed ring to the speed rating of your bow and dial in 20 yards with the turrets. This will get you close so you won't be too far off at 50 yards. Next shoot at 50 yards and zero in with the turrets. Then shoot again at 20 yards and adjust the speed ring only to get 20 dialed in (you will either hit high or low and adjusting the speed ring will get your elevation at 20 right).

You're supposed to be dialed in at this point with that scope.

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...So what you are saying, if I get the 50 mark [sighted] in, you go back and shoot the 20 [yds] with the 20 pin. ...and mine was about 2" high with 100 [gr fieldtip] and about even with the 125 [gr] pt.

Yes. ...Note: if you look through your scope, you will notice that the 50 yd crosshair is in the middle, or center, of the viewing area. This means that if you sight in the scope at 50 yds using the turret adjustments, you *could* move the speed dial from one extreme to the other and your 50 yd sight-in would not change. What changes is all the other crosshair's points-of-impacts as the image in the scope is zoomed in or out. ...here's another quick way to sight in the 20 yd crosshair AFTER you've sighted in the 50 yd crosshair. At 20 yds distance, shoot at a dot with your 50 yd crosshair. As expected, your arrow will impact high above your 50 yd crosshair. While holding your 50 yd crosshair on the dot you aimed at, turn the speed dial until the 20 yd crosshair aligns with your arrow you just shot.



JimD said:
...I tried an old muzzy 125 and it was about a ft low at 20and the cheap 100 were all over.
This could be a whole other issue. The quality of the arrows and whether they have been spine indexed, can have a major impact on their accuracy, as well as affecting broadhead accuracy.

JimD said:
SAM "Which means, you use the turret adjustments to sight the scope in at 50 yards and then use the speed dial to sight in the 40 thru 20 crosshairs." ...SO Basicly what they are saying is adjust the speed dial and keep shooting till the vertical point of aim is at the same as the scope for the 20 yard dot?
Yes

JimD said:
Say I was 2" high at 20 and shot the bow in at 375 I would go to 350 ?
... I think that if you're high, you increase the speed of the speed dial. If low, you slow it down.


JimD said:
Where on the site is good information on setting up broad heads correctly and shooting them in? Thanks, Jim
Most folks either sight in their fieldpoints first, then shoot their broadheads and then make adjustments to the scope for the new broadhead group. OR, they just shoot their broadheads only and sight it with them.

This is where I'm beginning to wonder if you're having accuacy issues too with your broadheads. A whole separate issue than sighting in a Ravin scope!


Good luck.



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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I think I finally get it. ;) Not very clear on the Ravin print out either and the Utube ;) Thanks

Yes I think the arrows are not stiff enough is part of the problem. The shoot ok with field points but take off with broads.

I have some old Barnett 22 inch arrows. Is there an way to cut them down or just use them with the extra weight? Is there a post on fine tuning your broad heads with the fletching for better results on stiffer bolts?
 

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It may also be the broadheads. Many fixed blade broadheads are not compatible with xbows. The surface area of the broadhead is so large it causes them to steer at the speeds these xbows generate. Look at the Ravin section and find some known flyers that fly like fieldpoints. I can vouch for Grim Reaper's XBow rated Razortips which are 3 blade, 1.5" cut mechanicals. They have a low flight profile so their is no need to index them to the vanes. Now these are one and done broadheads but they fly right and do a good job on deer, hogs, varmints and bears.

Stick with good quality arrows that are 20". There are lots of options out there. The best store bought arrows I can recommend are the TenPoint EVO-X CenterPunch or their Pro Elites.
 

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I think I finally get it. ;) Not very clear on the Ravin print out either and the Utube ;) Thanks

Yes I think the arrows are not stiff enough is part of the problem. The shoot ok with field points but take off with broads.

I have some old Barnett 22 inch arrows. Is there an way to cut them down or just use them with the extra weight? Is there a post on fine tuning your broad heads with the fletching for better results on stiffer bolts?
You need to use the same weight field point to sight it in at all yardages. If you are in a hurry to hunt with it get some mechanical heads the same weight as the field point and sight it in with the turrets and broadheads at forty yards and it should be good at all yardages if it was sighted in correctly with field points. They will fly real close to field points.Depending on how it is tuned some of the fixed blade heads will give you problems grouping. Stick with Ravin arrows for now. If you change the weight of arrows, field points or broadheads you have to sight in again. You have to use the Ravin nocks. Hope this helps.
 

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You need to use the same weight field point to sight it in at all yardages. If you are in a hurry to hunt with it get some mechanical heads the same weight as the field point and sight it in with the turrets and broadheads at forty yards and it should be good at all yardages if it was sighted in correctly with field points. They will fly real close to field points.Depending on how it is tuned some of the fixed blade heads will give you problems grouping. Stick with Ravin arrows for now. If you change the weight of arrows, field points or broadheads you have to sight in again. You have to use the Ravin nocks. Hope this helps.
HB - His bow is a CenterPoint Dagger or Mercenary 390 with a Ravin scope so the arrows in this case can be any 20" with half moons or similar nocks. I miss-read it the first time through as well and thought Ravin bow as well.
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Well I finally got it all set up only to find.
My old Barnett 22" bolts shoot a lot better than the APrime ones with all the flex. Hits 20 and 50 dead on.

What I need now are the correct broad heads. The old fixed that I have tend to not hold a pattern well.

I need to find the ideal 20" stiff bolts and a good broadhead that will hold a group.

I will take it with me and see what I can do. (if anything with this set up.) ;) :)

Suggestions?

Guys thanks for everything.
 

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JimD,

Moving on to arrows, have you checked to make sure that the vanes are clearing the rail OK? Any little interference will be magnified with broadheads.

I know nothing about the arrow brands you have and they may be decent arrows. It's possible that they can be stripped down and rebuilt with care by measuring the spine to make sure that they are all generally close together as a group; spine indexing to insure that each arrow leaves the bow with the stiff side in the same position and flexes in the same direction; that each end of the arrow is squared so that the insert and nock are square to the shaft to prevent any nock or broadhead wiggle; and that the type of vane and fletching position, ie offset, helical, or spin-tab, have plenty of rail clearance.

If you're not into building youself, quality arrows from Wyvern Creations or Tapp-Nation will get you there quickly.

As far as broadheads go, there are many fixed and mechanicals that will do the job IF the arrow is capable of doing its job.

Good luck.

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Iron Will broadheads are expensive but hands down the most accurate, sharpest and devastating broadhead out there. They also are extremely durable. They have a lifetime warranty as well, but do cost 35 to 40 each, but why skimp on the most significant part of killing an animal? If you spend hundreds on the trip, the bow and accessories, why not use the best broadhead? And I find they are very close to field point accuracy. I don't use mechanicals although they can also be accurate and create significant damage, but I just don't want the uncertainty of a possible failure when I release that arrow at a big game animal. Just my opinion.
 
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