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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I know this is not a new idea, and most of you already know this.

Having said that, I've purchased about 10 used hunting items including bows, scopes, binos, etc. from various hunting forums and places like Ebay, and I've been amazed that the majority of the items arrive smelling heavily of fragrances. Very strong smells of mostly what seems to be laundry detergents and/or fabric softeners, that take months to fade away.

A recent example: I bought a crossbow for my wife on Ebay, the bow itself is in great shape but it smells so strongly of fabric softener my whole house reeks of it.

Because this keeps happening it suggests to me that the majority of hunters may, like everyone else in the world, be using heavily scented products in the home (or car) and be unaware the impact this could have when hunting season arrives.

I'm just putting this out there in hopes that it might help some people. You may think you don't have a problem, but after years of using these products, people's noses become acclimated and they can no longer smell them. I'm talking about things like Downy Fabric Softener, Tide Detergent, Dryer Sheets, Fabreze, any car/home/bathroom fresheners, your favorite cologne/aftershave, home cleaning products, shampoos, soaps, the list is endless.

I'm just imagining a lot of hunters being very careful about applying scent control products on the day of their hunt, not realizing that body odor is the least of their problems.

Deer can also easily smell the fabric softener / laundry detergent / whatever other fragrance that permeates and covers everything they own, their arrows, bow, rangefinder, scope, and there's no easy solution once you're in this situation. These fragrances can take 6+ months to go away once you get them on your equipment.
 

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I had a spill of gold fish and minnows in my truck (had to give CPR to someone in a wreck and stopped to fast) a few weeks ago so i cleaned up and got me some smell good for the vents.... then i was heading out one day now with deer season in mind and went "what a dumbass........".....
 

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Discussion Starter #5
So, I guess my Old Spice scented after shave is a no-go! LOL... Just kidding.
You joke but I actually have an expensive scope I purchased about 5 months ago that still smells like the cologne of the original owner. It's a rather nice scent actually. On anything else, I wouldn't mind.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
I had a spill of gold fish and minnows in my truck (had to give CPR to someone in a wreck and stopped to fast) a few weeks ago so i cleaned up and got me some smell good for the vents.... then i was heading out one day now with deer season in mind and went "what a dumbass........".....
183676


You talking about this stuff? That's a great example of what I'm talking about. Hunters need to avoid products like this. When you get into nature, body odor may even be less of a giveaway than fragrances.
 

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We have seatbelt laws so about 3 months before season I stop using cologne. I always use free and clear laundry detergent . A month before season I wash inside my truck with scent free soap and water . Pull seatbelts out all the way and hot them good. I do this weekly untill the temp. goes to freezing .
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
We have seatbelt laws so about 3 months before season I stop using cologne. I always use free and clear laundry detergent . A month before season I wash inside my truck with scent free soap and water . Pull seatbelts out all the way and hot them good. I do this weekly untill the temp. goes to freezing .
The real test is to get someone who's not used to those scents to smell and see if the fragrance is still there. It's like a car that's owned by a smoker. To the smoker, it may not be noticable. But for a non-smoker, it's obvious and it's pretty hard to get rid of that odor.

Many of these fragrances just don't seem to go away no matter how hard you wash and scrub. Many fragrances chemically bind to things like plastics, rubber, polyester, and once that happens you aren't washing it away. And some things you can't easily wash, like your bow, binos, scope and rangefinder.
 

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I do use scent free soap for my clothes but mainly for the non-brightners but hang them outside to dry.

I pay more attention to the wind - wrong direction and I don’t hunt. I think trying to fool a deer’s nose is rather futile.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I do use scent free soap for my clothes but mainly for the non-brightners but hang them outside to dry.
I pay more attention to the wind - wrong direction and I don’t hunt. I think trying to fool a deer’s nose is rather futile.
Hi TP, sure ultimately that's key.

But I think there are hunters who use scent control products.

I'm just pointing out that the fragrances you use in your home/bathroom/car are another factor to consider. It's not just your body and your clothes, your gear could stink because they've been sitting around your ultra fragrant home.
 

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I’ve always thought it’s the breath you exhale is what alarms deer more than anything else.

I read an article long ago where eating meat gives you “predator breath” which deer detect as a threat. Deer will interact with other animals but once they smell a coyote they go on full alert.

The article went on to say that not eating meat for 2 weeks priors to the hunting season would purge the body of these orders and I’ve done that twice - it is a bit difficult.

And I’ve had deer down wind turn and come towards me being more curious than nervous.
 

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I was on a very strict vegan diet for health reasons last hunting season but I still did not have any big bucks come sniffin’ around.
I totally agree with the OP about scented products in the home. I use unscented soaps and deodorant year around. My wife gave up perfumes years ago because of my very sensitive sense of smell.
Even though I take many measures to eliminate as much of my scent as possible, playing the wind is still the number one method of avoiding being detected by animals.
 
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I really don't care what I smell like as I always play the wind. I am asked quite often where I am going to hunt the next day and I always say I have no idea until I get there and see what the wind is actually doing. I am never even sure which side of the mountain I will be sitting on until I check the wind. I just bathe using Ivory soap and wash my clothes in scent free no brightener added detergents and I always wear 17" high rubber boots when hunting with my pants legs tucked in. I use no scent killer sprays or deer attractant scents while hunting any more. I found out years ago that it mostly only works to take the $$$ out of your pockets. Do I ever get busted? Sure I do just like everyone else but it is usually because I got caught moving by a deer I had not noticed and not because I got smelled.
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
This year if my wife and I manage to get out there, deer will only suspect they're being stalked by a bottle of Ultra Downy® April Fresh™. :rolleyes:

Anyone have any ideas for how to get these smells off of hunting gear?
 

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Ozonators bring an interesting thing into the game though......When they're set just right, deer really do seem to not pick up my scent, even directly downwind!
 

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From Information Unlimited, it's ajustable from 100-500mg/hr. Run'n full bore can put out a whack of ozone!! But that spooks critters!!! Gotta have it set just right, which only come from trial and error....
 

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The trend for several years has been to put more scent into detergent, and the like. UV brighteners make you look like a neon sign, or so they say.
I've seen deer when hunting with a friend, and standing 20 or so feet apart, zero in on him like a radar. after riding with him, we smell somewhat the same, but the difference is the laundry soap. I can't go into his house and come home. LostWife makes me strip in the garage and head straight to the shower. Odd thing is, he never has much problems with getting a deer.
Oh well, I agree. If you want to smell as close to nothing then keep the smell out of the house. Changing habits a few weeks prior to the season isn't going to help a whole lot.
 
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I’d be concerned about breathing in that stuff.
 
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