Crossbow Nation banner

1 - 20 of 34 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am considering a Scorpyd DS. I have 3 excalibur's (which I love) a CAMX A4, and 2 Koda bows.
I'm interested in a reverse draw that is light weight and compact. Basically to have for specific hunting purposes such as confined blinds, treestands and turkey hunting.
Ok, so my buddy has one of the first DS bows that came out. I held it, shot it one time and it is light, compact and quiet. He likes it but always hunts with his excalibur micro 335. I ask him why and he said I like both of them but I can shoot most any broadhead with my excal and it's not as finicky. He said his DS is accurate but nocks have to be just right, the arrow weight is important (which I understand) and a few other things. Once it's dialed in, it is accurate he stated.
I have read other DS owners that seem to say they can be finicky but others love them.
I'm willing to find out for myself but I wanted to know what you folks that own them or have owned them think.
I love the design and the concept. The weight and the compactness is important also.
Thanks!
Matt
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,461 Posts
I don't think I've ever read a bad thing about a DS 420........I'd start right there!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
121 Posts
Finicky? No. Not at all as long you have the right scope , arrows and weigh. I have the first DS 380. Going up to 420 or the newest model that is coming out soon.
good luck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,095 Posts
My DS 380 was one of the originals and was a tad on the finicky side but as long as it was tuned correctly it shot pretty dang well. My DS 420 shoots about everything I have put in it dead on. I do greatly recommend that if you get one to change to Marty's string and cables when you wear out the factory ones. You will see a difference in quality and speed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,461 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
546 Posts
The DS420 I bought last winter almost made it to the garden as a tomato stake. First was the issues with arrows, no matter what I fletched up or changed ( spine, fletching, nocks, changed scopes three different times, you name it) I could only get about 5 keepers out of a dozen. ( this was with BEE's and Zombies) next was the latch issue, the bow ate the first serving up on the factory string in a VERY short time. I reserved and polished the latches to where the problem is minimal ( quality control is a wonderful thing just as long as someone who just shelled out a grand doesn't have to do it). After playing with this thing for untold amounts of time I finally came up with a set of arrows that worked very well. Easton aluminum 2219's with 90 grain inserts will center punch a quarter out to 50 yards. Total weight is 505 grain and over the chronograph I'm getting 355 fps. The bow overall is handy, light and quiet and one of the most aggravating pieces of equipment I have ever owned. I know there are countless numbers of others who swear by this bow, I swear at mine. This is my 2nd scorpyd, I highly doubt there will be a 3rd. As far as being trouble free or user friendly, I have three other excaliburs that you can feed just about any arrow you want and they will hammer the bull dead center perfect every time. Yeah they are noisy, and slow but you can count on them putting meat in the truck every time.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,067 Posts
I am considering a Scorpyd DS. I have 3 excalibur's (which I love) a CAMX A4, and 2 Koda bows.
I'm interested in a reverse draw that is light weight and compact. Basically to have for specific hunting purposes such as confined blinds, treestands and turkey hunting.
Ok, so my buddy has one of the first DS bows that came out. I held it, shot it one time and it is light, compact and quiet. He likes it but always hunts with his excalibur micro 335. I ask him why and he said I like both of them but I can shoot most any broadhead with my excal and it's not as finicky. He said his DS is accurate but nocks have to be just right, the arrow weight is important (which I understand) and a few other things. Once it's dialed in, it is accurate he stated.
I have read other DS owners that seem to say they can be finicky but others love them.
I'm willing to find out for myself but I wanted to know what you folks that own them or have owned them think.
I love the design and the concept. The weight and the compactness is important also.
Thanks!
Matt
OK, I just have to ask, why not consider a reverse draw TenPoint?
They are lightweight, up to 6" shorter and equal to or narrower than a DS420.
Plus the Siege RS410 has the AcuSlide Crank, excellent piece of work!

RDX 400: WickedRidge RDX400 Crossbow | Hunting Crossbow|Tenpoint

Siege RS410 (may get one with Havoc RS440 Limbs if you act fast): Quietest Compact Crossbow Ever | TenPoint Siege RS410 Crossbow
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Thanks for everyone's input. I love my excalibur's (Assassin 360, Assassin 420TD and my Micro 335) but I was hoping for a well balanced, light weight accurate bow without having to tweak and mess with a whole lot.
I know a few people with the same opinion as Runningbuck and others that love them. Seems most love them so far.
Thanks!
Matt
OK, I just have to ask, why not consider a reverse draw TenPoint?
They are lightweight, up to 6" shorter and equal to or narrower than a DS420.
Plus the Siege RS410 has the AcuSlide Crank, excellent piece of work!

RDX 400: WickedRidge RDX400 Crossbow | Hunting Crossbow|Tenpoint

Siege RS410 (may get one with Havoc RS440 Limbs if you act fast): Quietest Compact Crossbow Ever | TenPoint Siege RS410 Crossbow
Seems the 10 point is a pound heavier and about $700 more in price.
Thanks for your input though!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,095 Posts
I did have to polish one latch on my DS 420, took me about 15 min to do and it really helps if you know how to tune the string and cables correctly. I watched a video that Burky made when I installed Marty's string and cables and it was easy to tune and has not moved since. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Why does the consumer have to "polish" anything on a bow that cost $1200? Was it wearing out the serving prematurely? I have heard others say the same thing. Isn't that something that should be addressed before the bow is ready to be sold? Curious
None of my crossbows have never needed polished. I'm not saying you shouldn't have done it, just that it shouldn't have needed it.
Thx for your input!
Matt
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,067 Posts
Why does the consumer have to "polish" anything on a bow that cost $1200? Was it wearing out the serving prematurely? I have heard others say the same thing. Isn't that something that should be addressed before the bow is ready to be sold? Curious
None of my crossbows have never needed polished. I'm not saying you shouldn't have done it, just that it shouldn't have needed it.
Thx for your input!
Matt
You would think that would be the case.
I don't know, just kinda strange that the Manufacturers would let something like that slide.
I am sure most Manufacturers fix the issue in newer models, once they run out of inventory maybe?
 
  • Like
Reactions: Martymig

·
Registered
Ventilator 175 Extreme Horton Storm. Scorpyd Velocity 165
Joined
·
273 Posts
Why does the consumer have to "polish" anything on a bow that cost $1200? Was it wearing out the serving prematurely? I have heard others say the same thing. Isn't that something that should be addressed before the bow is ready to be sold? Curious
None of my crossbows have never needed polished. I'm not saying you shouldn't have done it, just that it shouldn't have needed it.
Thx for your input!
Matt
When I had my Excalibur Exomax, I spent a lot of time on their factory forum. There were countless threads regarding polishing latches to replacing triggers with TT's. So even the fabled tank of a bow like Excalibur have owners needing to tweak or repair their products. Most owners pay little to no attention to these things, and some don't even have a string wax and rail lube regimen. If you find the weapon that needs nothing done to it, cherish, is all I can say.
 

·
Member
Joined
·
3,419 Posts
Why does the consumer have to "polish" anything on a bow that cost $1200? Was it wearing out the serving prematurely? I have heard others say the same thing. Isn't that something that should be addressed before the bow is ready to be sold? Curious
None of my crossbows have never needed polished. I'm not saying you shouldn't have done it, just that it shouldn't have needed it.
Thx for your input!
Matt
I agree with you in that it shouldn’t be necessary, especially when the price tag exceeds $1000. That said, I have been doing my own maintenance on compound bows and crossbows since the early ‘90s. If I need to do something to improve one of my bows, I will do it. Every trigger I have has been worked and polished.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,095 Posts
Why does the consumer have to "polish" anything on a bow that cost $1200? Was it wearing out the serving prematurely? I have heard others say the same thing. Isn't that something that should be addressed before the bow is ready to be sold? Curious
None of my crossbows have never needed polished. I'm not saying you shouldn't have done it, just that it shouldn't have needed it.
Thx for your input!
Matt
While I agree that it should not happen it is a fact of life that it does happen and on some of the most expensive bows out there as often as the lower cost bows. How many times on these forums have you seen pics of strings with small frayed areas sticking up on the center servings? That is caused mostly by rough latches. Luckily it is an easy fix. I actually had one string fraying on a Scorpyd and couldn't find a rough place on the latch and then realized it was the sled that had the rough spot on it so out came the sandpaper and it was good to go a few minutes later.
The problem is really not from the manufacturer usually as they purchase the materials (latches.ect.) from subcontractors (Chinese probably) that make them by the thousands that are then installed in the bows. Quality control only goes so far to keep costs down and apparently checking latches is not a part of it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
546 Posts
While I agree that it should not happen it is a fact of life that it does happen and on some of the most expensive bows out there as often as the lower cost bows. How many times on these forums have you seen pics of strings with small frayed areas sticking up on the center servings? That is caused mostly by rough latches. Luckily it is an easy fix. I actually had one string fraying on a Scorpyd and couldn't find a rough place on the latch and then realized it was the sled that had the rough spot on it so out came the sandpaper and it was good to go a few minutes later.
The problem is really not from the manufacturer usually as they purchase the materials (latches.ect.) from subcontractors (Chinese probably) that make them by the thousands that are then installed in the bows. Quality control only goes so far to keep costs down and apparently checking latches is not a part of it.
In the case of the DS420 I believe the the trigger group and latches are MIM manufactured( metal injection moulding, which is state of the art production for everything from widgets to defense systems) depending on how many pieces are produced at a given time it can be easy to miss a run that is over filling the mould and producing sharp edges. Assembly work is usually piece work with time allotment on each assembly so, things can be missed there as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
What advantages would the Aculeus have over the DS. I'm considering it as well. I know it's much higher in price but are there $600 worth of advantages?
 
1 - 20 of 34 Posts
Top