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Mission Sub-1
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is embarrassing however I have to know... With all the emotions of my wife losing her last sibling within weeks of her lung cancer diagnosis, we left town to make arrangements legal and other wise, then the services. Came back a week later to find I had left my Mission Sub-1 cocked the entire time...

I looked it over very close and don't see anything abnormal however I don't know what to do to be sure it is ok. This being my first xbow I'd appreciate any advice to know what to do at this point.

Thanks in advance!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Sorry for your loss.
As for the crossbow, you checked it all over and found nothing wrong. I would just shoot it like you normally do.

Wishing you all the best.
Thank you brother, no worry about limb weakening or the cables or string being stretched or whatever?
 

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Thank you brother, no worry about limb weakening or the cables or string being stretched or whatever?
If you happened to have shot the crossbow using a chronograph, one would have an idea if there was a difference.
As for string and or string and cable stretch a couple things this depends on: 1)if the crossbow was shot a fair bit before, then the string and cables would already have stretched. 2)If the string and cables were properly built, even if shooting before there should be little to no stretch.

If the string and cables have stretched, it is just a matter of retuning the crossbow. Your manual may give the axle to axle measurement but that is only a guide line. Changing string and or string and cables or tuning, this measurement can change.

Advancing cams to match the manufactures advertised speed or to increase speed in feet per second, taking into consideration using an over weight arrow-point combination, this measurement can change.

If the crossbow stayed in tune, and suppose the limbs did weaken a bit, the crossbow would shoot a bit slower. The limbs should have a safety factor built into them where they can actually go higher than normal shooting.

As an example: a crossbow with 185 pound draw weight limbs, one does not build a bow string with a tensile strength of 185 pound. One would build it 300 or higher for the fact when the crossbow is shot, until the bowstring stabilizes there is going to be a lot of vibration. If string stops are used with next to no gap, when the string hits, the limbs still carry forward motion until they come to rest. One would want a built in safety factor.

Using my Barnett Ghost 410 as an example, the manual suggests 20" axle to axle when the crossbow is uncocked. My Ghost is modified with higher quality parts etc. and tuned to shoot well over Barnett's advertised speed. The axle to axle measurement averages 19 3/8".

The manufacture advertised the Ghost to shoot a 20" Barnett Custom Head Hunter 400 grain arrow-point combination at 410 feet per second. The Ghost is shooting a 20" Carbon Express Pile Driver 450 grain arrow-point combination averaging 421 to 423 feet per second. This is the the equivalent of shooting the 400 grain arrow-point combination at 436 to 438 feet per second.

All the best.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
If you happened to have shot the crossbow using a chronograph, one would have an idea if there was a difference.
As for string and or string and cable stretch a couple things this depends on: 1)if the crossbow was shot a fair bit before, then the string and cables would already have stretched. 2)If the string and cables were properly built, even if shooting before there should be little to no stretch.

If the string and cables have stretched, it is just a matter of retuning the crossbow. Your manual may give the axle to axle measurement but that is only a guide line. Changing string and or string and cables or tuning, this measurement can change.

Advancing cams to match the manufactures advertised speed or to increase speed in feet per second, taking into consideration using an over weight arrow-point combination, this measurement can change.

If the crossbow stayed in tune, and suppose the limbs did weaken a bit, the crossbow would shoot a bit slower. The limbs should have a safety factor built into them where they can actually go higher than normal shooting.

As an example: a crossbow with 185 pound draw weight limbs, one does not build a bow string with a tensile strength of 185 pound. One would build it 300 or higher for the fact when the crossbow is shot, until the bowstring stabilizes there is going to be a lot of vibration. If string stops are used with next to no gap, when the string hits, the limbs still carry forward motion until they come to rest. One would want a built in safety factor.

Using my Barnett Ghost 410 as an example, the manual suggests 20" axle to axle when the crossbow is uncocked. My Ghost is modified with higher quality parts etc. and tuned to shoot well over Barnett's advertised speed. The axle to axle measurement averages 19 3/8".

The manufacture advertised the Ghost to shoot a 20" Barnett Custom Head Hunter 400 grain arrow-point combination at 410 feet per second. The Ghost is shooting a 20" Carbon Express Pile Driver 450 grain arrow-point combination averaging 421 to 423 feet per second. This is the the equivalent of shooting the 400 grain arrow-point combination at 436 to 438 feet per second.

All the best.
Thank you, even knowing very little about xbows at this point this makes sense. Much appreciated!
 

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Sound advice with the chronograph. If you lost some speed I bet minor. Just make the adjustment with the sight and shoot on.

I recently purchased a TS370 and the build date in the box was 6/20/2018. Although, not cocked, I measured the ATA and it was to OEM specs. So here I have a Xbow build date that was almost 17 months, out of the box shooting 400grain arrow 368-370fps.

Limbs are tough!!!
 

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Watch … your serving for a while. Might be indented from long term pressure against the trigger assembly. "Might" have a tendency to separate going forward.
 

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What Duke said, check the serving. I normally switch my strings end for end after every few sessions, say 50 shots to even up wear from the rail but it also changes the angles on the trigger finger so worth a shot.

I have intentionally left 2 of my recurves cocked for a solid week after limb and string replacement to build my confidence in the reliability. A year and many shots later they are fine and I am more confident than ever.
 
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