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My question is this. When sighting-in your crossbow, lets say from a Lead Sled. Do you hold the front of the bow/muzzle or do you just let it recoil into your shoulder? Is there enough muzzle jump to be concerned?
 

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I hug it into my shoulder with my right hand but I don't hold the front with my left. Off hand shooting my left hand is more of a rest than a grip. Since the bow needs to be level anyway I find it easier to control without grasping it up front.
 

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Personally, I may use my off hand to provide very slight vertical pressure to get the crosshair/dot to settle perfectly on my target if needed, but that depends on my bench set up. Recently I have been using a BOG DeathGrip tripod, and that has worked out well for me. Muzzle jump is not a concern IMO. Then again, I am not shy to recoil and or muzzle jump. I'm the idiot that thought it was a good idea 25 years ago to pattern a then new 3.5" 12Ga. Ulti-Mag off a bench. Talk about muzzle flip and recoil...OUCH! I also regularly carry and shoot a hot 10mm load, have owned and loved shooting my Freedom Arms 454 Casull, 2" barreled 44 mags, snubbie 357 mags, and currently own and shoot a Winchester model 70 in 338 Win-mag. No wonder I had to have Carpel Tunnel surgery, I get migraine headaches, and I have a nervous flinch on the daily. LMAO! (Just kidding) :p Seriously though Gary, the best way to go about it, is what/how YOU are most comfortable and accurate with. Just don't neglect the safety aspect by getting your fingers to close to the rail. It takes time to develop your own effective, comfortable shooting style. Like any rifle, it should be tucked snug in to your shoulder, you should control your breathing, and the best shots seem to always be the ones that "Surprise" you when they break. Gently squeeze the trigger. Do not yank or jerk it. Enjoy the journey and the comradery here on CBN Gary. You WILL BE a better and more knowledgeable crossbow archer from interacting here and learning.
 

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Unless your bow is locked into a press IMO if you aren't slightly holding the forearm then what's holding the scope on the target as you pull the trigger (keeping in mind that some of these crossbows have a 7# pull trigger with a lot of creep)? Just find what works best for you being able to keep the center of the crosshair on center of the target until the arrow has left the riser.;):)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Unless your bow is locked into a press IMO if you aren't slightly holding the forearm then what's holding the scope on the target as you pull the trigger (keeping in mind that some of these crossbows have a 7# pull trigger with a lot of creep)? Just find what works best for you being able to keep the center of the crosshair on center of the target until the arrow has left the riser.;):)
Gabowman and Bulldoggboyz, do you guys think there is enough muzzle jump on a crossbow to affect arrow flight? I have read that some crossbows, maybe it was the reverse bow type that has different recoil, forward/backward.
 

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Gabowman and Bulldoggboyz, do you guys think there is enough muzzle jump on a crossbow to affect arrow flight? I have read that some crossbows, maybe it was the reverse bow type that has different recoil, forward/backward.
Negligible at best. I haven't shot a RD bow yet, so I cannot comment on that. But for the recoil/jump to affect the actual flight of the arrow all on it's own, without any shooter inference, would be counter productive to what bow manufacturers are trying to achieve these days. Once the shot is PROPERLY fired off, and your bow is working PROPERLY, you should not notice a negative impact on arrow flight. If your nocks are sliding a bit on the serving from being worn or defective, the string is riding above or below the nocks, cam timing is off, you have worn out components like cables/string, defective/worn nocks, delaminating or micro fractured limbs, etc. You should not have noticeable negatively impacted arrow flight. Now please remember there are a ton of variables involved here, but the premise remains the same in that the bow itself should not do anything upon proper firing, to negatively impact the flight of the arrow. How about you tell us EXACTLY what you are experiencing and why you feel this may be the case? Upon learning of your exact concerns/findings, folks here may be able to help you figure it out by process of elimination. Remember that key phrase..PROCESS OF ELIMINATION. This is very often your best friend and the most logical way to deal with uncertain issues regarding your equipment.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Negligible at best. I haven't shot a RD bow yet, so I cannot comment on that. But for the recoil/jump to affect the actual flight of the arrow all on it's own, without any shooter inference, would be counter productive to what bow manufacturers are trying to achieve these days. Once the shot is PROPERLY fired off, and your bow is working PROPERLY, you should not notice a negative impact on arrow flight. If your nocks are sliding a bit on the serving from being worn or defective, the string is riding above or below the nocks, cam timing is off, you have worn out components like cables/string, defective/worn nocks, delaminating or micro fractured limbs, etc. You should not have noticeable negatively impacted arrow flight. Now please remember there are a ton of variables involved here, but the premise remains the same in that the bow itself should not do anything upon proper firing, to negatively impact the flight of the arrow. How about you tell us EXACTLY what you are experiencing and why you feel this may be the case? Upon learning of your exact concerns/findings, folks here may be able to help you figure it out by process of elimination. Remember that key phrase..PROCESS OF ELIMINATION. This is very often your best friend and the most logical way to deal with uncertain issues regarding your equipment.
Thank you.
 

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Never gave it much thought but I could see where without holding down the front of the bow it could jump a tad before the arrow got completely off the riser. I don't shoot that way so I really don't know for sure though.
 
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In my experience it is best to hold the forearm with a light pressure while pulling the butt stock against the shoulder to anchor the crossbow.With my Ripper 415 the forearm fits snug into the sled rest so that is a plus. I use a Caldwell Lead Sled of a shooting bench and achieve some good results using this method. With my Ripper 415 the forearm fits snug into the sled rest so that is a plus.Using this method I have recently shot to 115 yards accurately. In my setup from one shot to the next requires very little adjustment to align the crossbow to the target.

 

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Thanks guys!
A look at my view from 115 yards.
 

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