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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a sniper 370 crossbow and found out today that the riser bolt is broken. Does anyone know the size and threads for a replacement? I emailed Centerpoint and after 1 hour on hold with support I gave up. I remembered this forum helped me out in the past. Thanks in advance.
 

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Try calling them first thing in the morning for best results. I bet they’ll send you one out free of charge.
 

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Excalibur Vortex 330, Centerpoint Sniper 370, Centerpoint Patriot 425
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17,172 Posts
I'd be guessing but I think 5/16ths standard thread socket head cap screw?!? If memory serves me correctly I believe it takes a 1/4" allen wrench. Get the correct size and length from CP and then head to Lowes.;):)
 

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That is an odd size thread. A 5/16" coarse thread nut will fit on that bolt but a bit loose.
A 5/16" coarse thread bolt will not screw in very far and it would jam if one went farther.

If one can not get the proper bolt, take a 5/16" coarse thread tap and run that in and it
will work to correct the thread size to SAE. In a bind, one can use a hex head bolt as
long as it is threaded enough.

A bolt supply store may have what is required.

Wishing you all the best.
Take care.
 

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Excalibur Exomax
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783 Posts
I’d want to know why it broke before I replaced it.
Bill
 
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In regards to why the riser bolt broke, here are the possibilities:

1)the riser bolt was cross threaded when it was installed or the
threads were not cleaned out after the hole was tapped causing
the bolt to cross thread or jam up. I have experienced this when
purchasing a crossbow set up on display. Who ever assembled
the riser to the rail-stock did not check why it was tough to install
the riser bolt.

2)when the riser bolt is installed, one turns the crossbow over
and inserts a small Allen screw which jams against the riser bolt
threads to keep the riser bolt from coming loose. This damages
the threads on the riser bolt which could have resulted in the
bolt being twisted off when trying to remove it. I will not install
the Allen screw for this very reason.

3)if the Allen screw was installed, then it was not removed
before attempting to remove the riser bolt.

Hopefully when the riser was removed, enough bolt was visible
so it could be removed.

Wishing you all the best.
Take care.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
"I’d want to know why it broke before I replaced it.
Bill "

Most likely when I tripped, fell, rolled down side of hill while walking out of my area. I imagine it was a humorous site, I wasn't too happy about it at the time. The bolt came out easily, there was plenty left to back it out of the stock and the threads look good.
 

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"I’d want to know why it broke before I replaced it.
Bill "

Most likely when I tripped, fell, rolled down side of hill while walking out of my area. I imagine it was a humorous site, I wasn't too happy about it at the time. The bolt came out easily, there was plenty left to back it out of the stock and the threads look good.
When you mention falling and that bolt breaking: between the rail stock and the riser is a plastic spacer
approximately 1/2" thick x 1 1/2" x 1 3/4". This may have got broken or lost. Also check the top front area
of the rail stalk for any damage. Being you fell, other parts of the riser may have received damage. Check
the limbs with a Q-tip. Any tiny splinters, the Q-tip will snag. Give the cams , bowstring and cables a good
inspection.
Here is a picture of the spacer block which is plastic.

Rectangle Circle Plastic Auto part Composite material
Rectangle Wood Font Circle Art

Wishing you all the best.
Take care.
 

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Excalibur Exomax
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783 Posts
"I’d want to know why it broke before I replaced it.
Bill "

Most likely when I tripped, fell, rolled down side of hill while walking out of my area. I imagine it was a humorous site, I wasn't too happy about it at the time. The bolt came out easily, there was plenty left to back it out of the stock and the threads look good.
Glad you are ok.
Bill
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
Thank you!!! 5/16-18X1.75 perfect fit. Centerpoint support still has not got back with me due to heavy volume to their support, but all is well. Thank you to each and everyone of you. I pray y'all get the BUCK of your dreams this year.
I used these as temporary fix until Centerpoint gets back to me. Overnight delivery, no missed hunting days. I blacked out the screw head with flat black marker. The McMaster Carr bolts where going to be several days, if not week and a half delivery.

 

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Centerpoint sniper 370
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26 Posts
In regards to why the riser bolt broke, here are the possibilities:

1)the riser bolt was cross threaded when it was installed or the
threads were not cleaned out after the hole was tapped causing
the bolt to cross thread or jam up. I have experienced this when
purchasing a crossbow set up on display. Who ever assembled
the riser to the rail-stock did not check why it was tough to install
the riser bolt.

2)when the riser bolt is installed, one turns the crossbow over
and inserts a small Allen screw which jams against the riser bolt
threads to keep the riser bolt from coming loose. This damages
the threads on the riser bolt which could have resulted in the
bolt being twisted off when trying to remove it. I will not install
the Allen screw for this very reason.

3)if the Allen screw was installed, then it was not removed
before attempting to remove the riser bolt.

Hopefully when the riser was removed, enough bolt was visible
so it could be removed.

Wishing you all the best.
Take care.
I noticed on my sniper 370 that the
small Allen screw which jams against the riser bolt threads to keep the riser bolt from coming loose, that you mentioned, is missing on my sniper. Would I be okay without this Allen screw and just use some loctite or would you happen to know the dimensions of the Allen screw so I could replace it? Thanks
 

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I noticed on my sniper 370 that the
small Allen screw which jams against the riser bolt threads to keep the riser bolt from coming loose, that you mentioned, is missing on my sniper. Would I be okay without this Allen screw and just use some loctite or would you happen to know the dimensions of the Allen screw so I could replace it? Thanks
Greetings:
I never have used the Allen screw as it will damage the threads of the riser bolt if one
either has to remove the riser bolt or forgets to remove the Allen screw when going to
remove the riser bolt.
I use a good size Allen wrench that fits the riser bolt and tighten it good. Mine have
never come loose.
I prefer not to use locktite for the reason I do a lot of target shooting and often remove
the riser to either fine tune or replace warn servings. My crossbows all use 1/2 moon
nocks so what I have been testing is Poly Grip approximately 6" wide in the arrow-latch
area covered by a 4" wide layer of BCY .030 serving. The Poly Grip bonds tight to both
the bowstring and to the upper layer of BCY .030 serving. Due to using 1/2 moon nocks,
I am not limited to serving diameter.

Wishing you all the best with what ever you decide.
Take care.
 

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Centerpoint sniper 370
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26 Posts
Greetings:
I never have used the Allen screw as it will damage the threads of the riser bolt if one
either has to remove the riser bolt or forgets to remove the Allen screw when going to
remove the riser bolt.
I use a good size Allen wrench that fits the riser bolt and tighten it good. Mine have
never come loose.
I prefer not to use locktite for the reason I do a lot of target shooting and often remove
the riser to either fine tune or replace warn servings. My crossbows all use 1/2 moon
nocks so what I have been testing is Poly Grip approximately 6" wide in the arrow-latch
area covered by a 4" wide layer of BCY .030 serving. The Poly Grip bonds tight to both
the bowstring and to the upper layer of BCY .030 serving. Due to using 1/2 moon nocks,
I am not limited to serving diameter.

Wishing you all the best with what ever you decide.
Take care.
Greetings:
I never have used the Allen screw as it will damage the threads of the riser bolt if one
either has to remove the riser bolt or forgets to remove the Allen screw when going to
remove the riser bolt.
I use a good size Allen wrench that fits the riser bolt and tighten it good. Mine have
never come loose.
I prefer not to use locktite for the reason I do a lot of target shooting and often remove
the riser to either fine tune or replace warn servings. My crossbows all use 1/2 moon
nocks so what I have been testing is Poly Grip approximately 6" wide in the arrow-latch
area covered by a 4" wide layer of BCY .030 serving. The Poly Grip bonds tight to both
the bowstring and to the upper layer of BCY .030 serving. Due to using 1/2 moon nocks,
I am not limited to serving diameter.

Wishing you all the best with what ever you decide.
Take care.
Thanks for the information man. So I will do what your doing. So you use polygrip for 6 inches. What diameter for the 6 inches. I'm new to all this so is polygrip a brand? What does bcy stand for, is it a brand? Do you remove original serving before putting the 6 inches of polygrip on? Thanks
 

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Thanks for the information man. So I will do what your doing. So you use polygrip for 6 inches. What diameter for the 6 inches. I'm new to all this so is polygrip a brand? What does bcy stand for, is it a brand? Do you remove original serving before putting the 6 inches of polygrip on? Thanks
I purchase the Poly Grip .025 and the BCY .030 from 60X Custom strings.
Both products come on spools. I purchased a serving tool from EBay.com
where the spool fits and one can add tension when doing the serving.
The names I give is what the serving is called on 60X website.
Poly Grip is $10.95 a spool. BCY .030 is $18.95 a spool and is available in
several colors. Click on "bowstring building" then "serving material".

Poly Grip bonds well to the bowstring and to the upper layer of the BCY .030.
I would not just use the Poly Grip by itself for serving in the arrow latch area
as it does not stand up to wear like the BCY .030. Some areas of the bowstring
that is not in the latch area, I have over lapped worn or separated serving areas
as a re enforcement.

60X also sells pre built bowstrings and or bowstring and cables sets. Click on
"Ready To Ship Crossbow" then select the brand of crossbow, then the series.
Select bowstring or string and cables. One has a few color choices or go custom
colors which will cost a bit more and takes time to build.

The serving tool is on sale for $13.94 on EBay and shows the 2 brass bars.
One gets the tool but the spool is just for demonstration. Pay attention how
the serving is installed on the tool. This helps create tension. One tightens
the wing nut on the spool bolt to increase tension.

Usually the original bowstring serving has separated as the bowstring was
not under enough tension before the serving was installed. If one does not
have the adapters for a press to install the bowstring to add tension, some
times I put a round screw driver up right in a vice. Put one end of the bowstring
on the screw driver and use a ratchet strap in the other bowstring loop and then
the other end of the strap is anchored to something solid. Using a ratchet strap,
one can adjust the tension.

I mark the bowstring with white out where I want to start and end the serving.
I do not do back serving like videos show. At the start, I make a loop around the
bowstring and pull it very tight, leaving a tag end about 2 or 3 inches long. To
hold this in place I use a pair of needle nose vise grips with rubber hose over
the points and clamp it onto the tag end as it lays along the bowstring. Install
the serving as one normally would. I start on the left side and go over the top
of the bowstring to the right.

When I am almost done the serving as I would go over the top, bring the serving
through the loop and pull it towards the served section. I roll this very tight using
needle nose pliers. I do two more loops like this pulling tight toward the preceeding
loop. I leave a small tag end. Go back to the start and install two more loops the same
way, pulling very tight toward what you have served. Trim the tag ends short but leave
a wee bit. To these small tag ends, I add a wee dab of Gorilla Glue and let it set up. I
go right around the end of the serving with a wee dab of Gorilla Glue. This is added
insurance against serving separation. All the serving ends get this wee dab of Gorilla
Glue whether my own servings or manufactures.

I have found too many bowstrings that were not under enough tension prior to adding
the serving. Due to this, the serving has separated.

I lightly lube the bowstring, cables, serving and a lite coat on the rail with Trident Silicone
Grease available on the internet. This is a high quality product that does not dry out or
gum up like wax but stays moist. A wee bit goes along way. Shooting 8 shots before
removing my arrows I may lube every 8 or 16 shots. A small paint brush works well to
get into small areas when applying the Trident.

Wishing you all the best.
Take care.
 

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Centerpoint sniper 370
Joined
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26 Posts
I purchase the Poly Grip .025 and the BCY .030 from 60X Custom strings.
Both products come on spools. I purchased a serving tool from EBay.com
where the spool fits and one can add tension when doing the serving.
The names I give is what the serving is called on 60X website.
Poly Grip is $10.95 a spool. BCY .030 is $18.95 a spool and is available in
several colors. Click on "bowstring building" then "serving material".

Poly Grip bonds well to the bowstring and to the upper layer of the BCY .030.
I would not just use the Poly Grip by itself for serving in the arrow latch area
as it does not stand up to wear like the BCY .030. Some areas of the bowstring
that is not in the latch area, I have over lapped worn or separated serving areas
as a re enforcement.

60X also sells pre built bowstrings and or bowstring and cables sets. Click on
"Ready To Ship Crossbow" then select the brand of crossbow, then the series.
Select bowstring or string and cables. One has a few color choices or go custom
colors which will cost a bit more and takes time to build.

The serving tool is on sale for $13.94 on EBay and shows the 2 brass bars.
One gets the tool but the spool is just for demonstration. Pay attention how
the serving is installed on the tool. This helps create tension. One tightens
the wing nut on the spool bolt to increase tension.

Usually the original bowstring serving has separated as the bowstring was
not under enough tension before the serving was installed. If one does not
have the adapters for a press to install the bowstring to add tension, some
times I put a round screw driver up right in a vice. Put one end of the bowstring
on the screw driver and use a ratchet strap in the other bowstring loop and then
the other end of the strap is anchored to something solid. Using a ratchet strap,
one can adjust the tension.

I mark the bowstring with white out where I want to start and end the serving.
I do not do back serving like videos show. At the start, I make a loop around the
bowstring and pull it very tight, leaving a tag end about 2 or 3 inches long. To
hold this in place I use a pair of needle nose vise grips with rubber hose over
the points and clamp it onto the tag end as it lays along the bowstring. Install
the serving as one normally would. I start on the left side and go over the top
of the bowstring to the right.

When I am almost done the serving as I would go over the top, bring the serving
through the loop and pull it towards the served section. I roll this very tight using
needle nose pliers. I do two more loops like this pulling tight toward the preceeding
loop. I leave a small tag end. Go back to the start and install two more loops the same
way, pulling very tight toward what you have served. Trim the tag ends short but leave
a wee bit. To these small tag ends, I add a wee dab of Gorilla Glue and let it set up. I
go right around the end of the serving with a wee dab of Gorilla Glue. This is added
insurance against serving separation. All the serving ends get this wee dab of Gorilla
Glue whether my own servings or manufactures.

I have found too many bowstrings that were not under enough tension prior to adding
the serving. Due to this, the serving has separated.

I lightly lube the bowstring, cables, serving and a lite coat on the rail with Trident Silicone
Grease available on the internet. This is a high quality product that does not dry out or
gum up like wax but stays moist. A wee bit goes along way. Shooting 8 shots before
removing my arrows I may lube every 8 or 16 shots. A small paint brush works well to
get into small areas when applying the Trident.

Wishing you all the best.
Take care.
That was very helpful thanks a lot. The latches that hold back my string on my sniper are pretty rough on the serving so I think this will be the way to go. Thanks and God bless
 
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